Jana and the Turk - Ljumbi Jana Tursheto

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Could some one transcribe the lyrics of this Bulgarian song?

Jana and the Turk / Ljumbi Jana Tursheto - Bilja Krstic

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Do you have a custom there, in Macedonia, called something like Martenitsa - at spring break?

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Yes, we do have the Martenica. The origin of the Macedonian names of the months, basically, is related with the natural cycles and agricultural works which happen during the corresponding month. So, the month March, which in Macedonian is mart/CUTar (‘cut/цут’ means ‘bloom’) is the month of the blooming.
Letnik (‘leto’ is summer) is a national Macedonian holiday which is celebrated on the 1-st of March and it’s related with the return of the migratory birds from the south, the blooming of the trees and the start of the agricultural work.
From what I have read in one Macedonian newsletter, the 1-st of March was celebrated also by our ancestors, or the Ancient Macedonian, as the holiday of light, called Ksantika, which was also connected with the day getting bigger, blooming trees etc. According to the legend, Ksantija was the goddess of all the flowers that bloomed in the gardens, the fields and mountains and the god Macedon fell in love with her. After the bad forces of the pantheon gods turned Ksantija into a flower, the god Macedon searched for his first love every year through the meadows and fields, so, to honor this great love, the Ancient Macedonian called the first month in spring Ksant, and the first holiday – Ksantika.
It’s the holiday of light, love and beauty, just like in ancient times. According to the custom, everyone should put a martinka/мартинка, red and white thread, a symbol of happiness, joy and love.
Unfortunately, people do this custom less and less these day, which is for shame. It’s 100 times better than the dull holiday St. Valentine, they seem to appreciate more.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Martenitsa-hand-made.jpg

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Hey, Ivan you've managed to steel even this from Bulgaria? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martenitsa Have you read the article or you've just invented another macedonian tale? Hunza!

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Да украдам? Хахаха! Laughing out loud
Извини, ама немав никаква нaмeра да украдам било што, туку одговорив на прашањето дека да, и во Македонија имаме таков обичај. Ништо не сум измислил, само го пренесов она што ги имам прочитано во дневен весник, за да напоменам дека и претходно кај нас се празнувал некој сличен празник со одредени обичаи. А и во самава статија на Википедија, вели дека: „Similar tradition is also held by thοse in the Republic of Macedonia“. Под ова се подразбира дека не измислувам лаги, ниту пак народни легенди, за нешто што гледам дека се случува и негува сѐ уште и кај нас. А тоа дека обичаите се малку поразлични, исто, не го прави погоре напишаноно лага.
Поздрав!

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"The origin of the Macedonian names of the months, basically, is related with the natural cycles and agricultural works which happen during the corresponding month." От това се подразбира, че празникът е измислен в Македония. Все едно, ясно е, че се празнува на балканите. По времето, когато е въведен обичая сме били една държава. Поздрав.

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Well, guy, no one will never know who invented that custom.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C4%83r%C5%A3i%C5%9For
So we could just enjoy our shared customs. The video above is submitted on Bilja Krstic's youtube channel, it's also on the map on her website
http://www.bilja.rs/regions.php
as located in Bulgaria. If you, Ivan, feel offended, you should know that on that map, there's a Gyspy song in Romanian language. But that doesn't offend me. I would have preferred a traditional Romanian song, but it's fine.
Even if us Romanians, we don't have a Slavonic language like you, guys, Macedonians, Bulgarians, Serbs, we are in a sort of continuum region and we share many things whether we like it or not.
So, I understand political disagreement, but let's not fight over cultural issues.
I honestly believe that Macedonians have many more things in common than differences with both Bulgarians and Serbs. So let's focus on that.

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The YouTube video I found said that it was a Macedonian song, but since the official web-page says the song is from Bulgaria, I stand corrected. I shall change the language. Sorry for the confusion I made. :biggrin: