Maná - El verdadero amor perdona ( Αγγλικά μετάφραση)

Αγγλικά μετάφραση

True Love Forgives

Versions: #1#2#3#4#5
You have all of space
Drowned in your absence
Drowned in your silence
There are no words, no forgiveness
 
You have me as one forgotten
You don't answer my calls
Don't throw dirt on my words
You are condemning me like nothing
Don't bury me without forgiving me
 
Look, my love, at what deception is
It reverses itself and causes damage
It bursts in the air
Like soap bubbles
 
How could I have been capable of hurting you?
Tricking and offending you?
Soul mate, I can’t forget you
Even if it rips my heart apart
 
Oh! The resentment that poisons us
That causes us damage
Even if you don’t return, my love
You should still forgive me
 
True love forgives
It doesn't abandon, it doesn't break
It doesn't imprison, it doesn't burst
Like soap bubbles
 
A mistake is something human
I am not justifying the betrayal
True lovers
Understand each other, love each other
And forget any resentments
 
The night begins to mutiny against me
With shattered dreams and pain
And I toss and turn in bed
Desperately holding on to nothing
Imploring your forgiveness
 
Look, my love, how much I miss you
Days pass, years pass
And my live bursts
Like soap bubbles
 
How could I have been capable of hurting you?
Tricking and offending you?
Soul mate, I can’t forget you
Even if it rips my heart apart
 
Oh! The resentment that poisons us
That causes us damage
Even if you don’t return, my love
You should still forgive me
 
True love forgives
It doesn't abandon, it doesn't break
It doesn't imprison, it doesn't burst
Like soap bubbles
 
True love forgives
True love forgives
If a love is true
It doesn't break, it doesn't abandon
If a love is true
It doesn't break, it doesn't abandon
 
Υποβλήθηκε από elizabeth.hayes08 στις Τετ, 04/02/2015 - 23:56
Σχόλια συντάκτη:

Using this for my class, to teach -AR verbs. Love this song!
-Professor, linguist, translator, interpreter

Ισπανικά

El verdadero amor perdona

Σχόλια
Grampa Wild Willy    Πέμ, 05/02/2015 - 13:28

You know my Spanish is just this side of non-existent, but my English is alright. So I'm going to point out some things in the English that don't quite sound natural to me & let's see if maybe there is a better way of translating some of this.

The first verse doesn't make a lot of sense to me the way it is now. I am going to propose something that makes sense to me & you tell me if it captures the sense of the lyrics.
All the spaces you used to fill are now
Drowned in your absence
Drowned in your silence
There are no words, no forgiveness

Tú me tienes olvidado > You act like you've forgotten me?

You are condemning me like nothing > Do you mean "You are condemning me like I am nothing" or "You are condemning me to oblivion."

Se revierte > Is the idea here that deception hurts the deceiver?

Tricking and offending you? > You translated "engañar" in the preceding verse as "deceive." Why not here as well?

Nos hace daño > Hurts us?

No abandona > It doesn't give up?

And my live bursts > That would be "life" I think.

Have you ever clicked on the link that gets generated by what you put in the "Translation source:" box? You really should just leave that blank. That box is meant to refer to a translation done by someone else and you're just copying it here. The base assumption on this site is that unless stated otherwise, the person posting the translation is the one who created it. So there's no need to fill in that box and every reason to leave it blank.

And please put in some punctuation. At least periods to mark where the sentences end. I'm guessing the original Spanish could do with some periods as well.

elizabeth.hayes08    Παρ, 06/02/2015 - 00:47

Maná is very over-the-top in their romanticism, so I was trying to preserve the original intent of the choppiness and poetic dramatization of the original. If you would prefer a run-of-the-mill translation with commonplace thought-for-thought, I can do that. It is a difference in translation theory, but if that is what you would like I can redo it.

Grampa Wild Willy    Δευ, 09/02/2015 - 10:21

I don't think I'm looking to obscure any, as you put it, over-the-top romanticism. I'm looking at some turns of phrase that are awkward to the point of obscuring meaning. If the meaning isn't coming through, then you're not accomplishing your goal of letting English speaking people understand a song in a language they don't understand. In addition, adding a little punctuation wouldn't affect its "over-the-top-ness" would it?

Let's take the first line for example.

You have all of space

It may be over-the-top romantic, choppy, and poetic, but it also doesn't mean anything. With my rudimentary understanding of Spanish, it looks like you have pretty literally translated that line word for word. But I suspect there is another meaning to it that is carried in the Spanish and that is what I am looking to find in the translatiion. I don't think that has anything to do with a theory of translation. It's just a desire to capture the meaning in the other language. If my attempt at trying to make sense of it has fallen flat, OK, I'm not surprised. I make no claims to any level of expertise in Spanish. But I should think you could come up with something that does make a little more sense, while preserving all the poetry of the original. Are making sense and being poetic mutually exclusive alternatives?

elizabeth.hayes08    Πέμ, 12/02/2015 - 17:23

"You have all of space" as in all space, the space between all objects, outer space, all of space, space used as an all-encompassing word.

The thing with translation theory is that, as the Italians put it "traductore, traditore." [translator, traitor.] Anytime you go from one language to another, the nuances of sociolinguistics and even the idiosyncrasies of the speaker must go with it.

There are many ways to translate, as can be seen in the endless bible translations on the market.

Two popular methodologies are:
• thought-for-thought, where the words are completely different but the intent is paraphrased.
• word-for-word, where you try to match up the syntax and word origin wherever possible.

The latter is helpful for didactic purposes because a [second language grammar] student can see the "why" of the wording in the target language.

If that is not a concern in the least, then thought-for-thought is usually more accurate, but only if the translator has a thorough grasp of the slang, idioms, and expressions in both languages.

I usually opt for the former for students, and the latter for instantaneous interpretation in the courtroom. The issue is that the translation becomes a paraphrase of the original, and its meaning will be determined by how well the interpreter / translator knows both languages.

In this particular instance, I intentionally left the ambiguity and "open meanings" to allow for interpretation of why those words were chosen by Maná.

It takes all the fun out of poetry when there is added punctuation and when there are explanations, but that's just me being a college professor ☺

Thanks for letting me talk linguistics (my love and passion)! Hope that bit of information helps.
♥ENH

Grampa Wild Willy    Πέμ, 12/02/2015 - 18:50

Translations in the courtroom? That takes guts!

And talk linguistics all you want. I'm sure I (and anyone lucky/smart enough to come here and absorb it) will learn something to apply to translations here.

And I actually know the word "traditore" from Aida, Act 4, scene 1. A high point in the show.

In my own stumbling way, I have been trying to capture ideas in my translations while keeping as many of the original words as I can. Not slavishly, but as much as I can. Would you consider that a hybrid of your two approaches? That all just came from intuition, not any formal education on the subject of translation. I don't see translation as creating a new work. It's putting somebody else's work into another language using words the original creator would have used had he or she known the target language. Sometimes it's a translation of the words, because that happens to capture the idea. But not always.

Still, I should think that any translation, whether literal or conceptual, would result in language that is idiomatic and vernacular. That's the way folks use the target language and after all, our intent is to make it possible for people to understand in their own language what's being sung in a language they might not know. Plus I daresay the language of the original song is in idiomatic, vernacular language (Spanish in the case under discussion here). Maná are using idiomatic, vernacular Spanish that an ordinary citizen on the streets of Barcelona or Mexico City might use, aren't they? The issues I raised in my earlier comments were all related to this subject. It wasn't about being more literal. It was about expressing things in a more natural way in the target language (English, in this case) to make it easier to understand. Not explain it all and take away the romance of the experience. Just make it language that allows for the possibility of the English reader to come up with his or her own interpretation. You can't do that if you can't figure out what the words are trying to say because the sentences don't seem "native."

As for punctuation, I encourage you to go argue with this guy. Something tells me you're not going to win that one.

Please revisit my original suggested revisions. Actually, they are more questions than suggestions. But they are questions on words I believe need revising.