Mary Black - Song for Ireland (German translation)

German translation

Lied für Irland

Ging den ganzen Tag neben hohen Türmen entlang
Wo Falken ihre Nester bauen
Auf silbernen Schwingen fliegen sie
Sie kennen den Ruf der Freiheit in ihren Brüsten
Sah Black Head sich gegen den Himmel abzeichnen
Mit seinen zerklüfteten Felsen, welche sich bis zum Meer erstrecken
Während ich an deiner westlichen Küste lebte
Sah ich sommerliche Sonnenuntergänge und bekam nicht genug davon
Ich stand am Atlantik
Und sang ein Lied für Irland
 
Redete den ganzen Tag mit wahren Freunden
Die einem zum Bleiben verleiten wollen
Erzählten uns Witze und Neuigkeiten
Sangen Lieder bis spät in die Nacht
Beobachtete die Galway-Lachse dahinflitzen
Die in der Sonne wie Silber glänzten
Während ich an deiner westlichen Küste lebte
Sah ich sommerliche Sonnenuntergänge und bekam nicht genug davon
Ich stand am Atlantik
Und sang ein Lied für Irland
 
Trank den ganzen Tag in alteingesessenen Pubs
In welchen oft Geigenspielern aufspielen
Jemand strich den Bogen
Er spielte einen irischen Volkstanz, wie großartig und lustig das doch war
Stand bei Dingle am Strand und
Im wildschäumenden Atlantik entdeckten wir Seebarsche
Während ich an deiner westlichen Küste lebte
Sah ich sommerliche Sonnenuntergänge und bekam nicht genug davon
Ich stand am Atlantik
Und sang ein Lied für Irland
 
Träumte in der Nacht
Dass ich ein Land gesehen hatte, in welchem kein Mensch kämpfen musste
Als ich in deinem Morgengrauen erwachte
Sah ich dich weinend im Morgenlicht
Dort liegend, wo die Falken fliegen
Während ich an deiner westlichen Küste lebte
Sah ich sommerliche Sonnenuntergänge und bekam nicht genug davon
Ich stand am Atlantik
Und sang ein Lied für Irland
 
Urheberrechtlich geschützt nach §2 UrhG.
Diese Übersetzung darf nur mit Genehmigung des Urhebers wiedergegeben werden.
Submitted by Flopsi on Wed, 15/03/2017 - 18:49
Last edited by Flopsi on Sat, 16/12/2017 - 09:02
English

Song for Ireland

More translations of "Song for Ireland"
GermanFlopsi
Idioms from "Song for Ireland"
See also
Comments
celalkabadayi    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 16:55

What do you think about the beginnings of Stanzas like this:

Walking......... Gehend
Talking ...........Redend
Living..........Lebend
Drinking.........Trinkend
Dreaming.........Träumend

The part in paranthesis is past tense and the beginning is past too.

Living on your western shore (saw summer sunsets, asked for more
I stood by your Atlantic sea, and sang a song for Ireland)

Ich lebe an deiner westlichen Küste, (sah sommerliche Sonnenuntergänge, wollte mehr
Ich stand am Atlantik und sang ein Lied für Irland)

Flopsi    Thu, 14/12/2017 - 17:40

You got me. I never understood anything about grammar, not in German, not in English. But what I do know is that though "gehend, redend, lebend" does exist nobody hardly ever uses them talking and so I don't use them either.

celalkabadayi    Thu, 14/12/2017 - 17:53

OK. Then you can consider this part again:

Living on your western shore, saw summer sunsets asked for more
I stood by your Atlantic sea, and I sang a song for Ireland

Here you can think "living" as " while I was living" then your translation can be better....

Freundliche Grüsse von mir aus der Türkei...

Flopsi    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 14:02

Thank you for trying to help me.
I'm not sure about the "living". I thought this is short for "I'm living", but "as I'm living" or "while I'm linving" sounds also good to me.
Maybe some native speaker can help me with this part?

petit élève    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 14:06

I'm no native, but I rather understand it as "since I lived near the shore, I could dream of the West...".
It is quite open to interpretation though. If I had to translate it into French I would pick the most general equivalent.

Gavin    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 16:01

It's really just something that occured at the same time - the whole takes place in the past.
(I was) Living on your western shore, (I) saw summer sunsets, (and I) asked for more.

The lyrics are correct now except for:
Someone touched the bow, he played a reel, it seemed so fine and gay => so grand and gay
Lying where the Falcons fly, they twist and turn all in you ever blue sky => your ever blue sky
...and in fact she sings "e'er" rather than "ever" - but that of course does mean the same thing.

Saw (Not soar) Black Head against the sky. Black Head is a place: https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Attraction_Review-g1185942-d10778357-Revie...
https://goo.gl/maps/DZDUANnS2du

Regular smile

sandring    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 14:24

Flopsi, let me edit the text, first. She sings "by you, Atlantic sea" Regular smile

Burghold    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 14:28

Auf der Mary-Black-Webseite wird: "Saw Black Head against the sky, with twisted rocks that run down to the sea"
angezeigt - wenn das stimmt ...

sandring    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 14:29

Yeah, correct. Which twisted rocks

sandring    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 14:47

Strange, she sings differently each time. I think it's dialectal, I'm not well aware of the Irish accent. So I corrected only the rocks.

As for your German translation, Flopsi, you may translate those "ings" as a sentence in the past and make peace with it.

Walking all the day = I walked all day

Drinking all the day in old pubs = I drank all day

Living on your western shore, saw summer sunsets asked for more = I lived on your western shore, saw summer sunsets and asked for more etc. Don't worry, that will be correct Regular smile

Flopsi    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 20:02

Yes, I know that Black Head is a place, but somehow while translating the song I thought she's singing about the lighthouse.

Thanks to you all for your great help. You've all been so kind. I really do appreciate this. I'll go through the lyrics once more and will edit the translation soon.

Gavin    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 20:12

Oh yes, she may well mean the lighthouse. But that's why it's definitely "saw" not "soar". Regular smile

Burghold    Fri, 15/12/2017 - 20:19

Und bitte auch noch verbessern:
"Lying where the falcons fly, they twist and turn all in your e'er blue sky"

sandring    Sat, 16/12/2017 - 06:26

The lyrics edited. I'd like to thank each of you for an impressive teamwork. Dear Flopsi, now you can edit your translation and good luck! Regular smile

Gavin    Sat, 16/12/2017 - 11:44

Good stuff!
I'm not convinced by "which twisted rocks", it makes no grammatical sense - although I grant it does sound a bit like it. I'm sure it should be "with". I suspect she actually sings "wi' twisted rocks" and the collision between the words creates a "tch" sound.
Of course, you can find anything on the net but on this occasion 'genius' agrees. https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/genius.com/amp/Mary-black-song-for-irelan...
Regular smile

sandring    Sat, 16/12/2017 - 13:31

Yeah, that was a stumbling rock. But, in fact, she might have meant something like the lighthouse that changed the rocky skyline? But the rules are that the lyrics should match a particular video, I couldn't muffle up my ears to her "which". It stood out. Anyway, singers never sing their lyrics precisely. Let's forgive them Devil smile

Gavin    Sat, 16/12/2017 - 15:35

Fair does - it certainly does sound that way. Possibly it's some quirk of the Irish accent I've not encountered. Nonetheless I think translators would be best to treat it as "with" to allow themselves to make sense of the line. Regular smile

sandring    Mon, 18/12/2017 - 09:04

I've changed "which" into "with". I've been listening to another song for transcription and, you know what? The Irish singer pronounces "which" where only "with" can unambiguously be. You are right, Gavier, common sense is better than ears. Regular smile

Gavin    Mon, 18/12/2017 - 10:01

Ah It must be the accent after all - of course there's plenty of variation within Irish accents themselves so even being fairly familiar with it it can still throw up surprises. Regular smile