Paula Fernandes - Debaixo do cacho (English translation)

English translation

Under the tree

Let's shake a leg, everybody!
 
Under the tree, beautiful morena1
The drum, the rattle, they sing to the little girl
Under the tree, I call for an encore
The drum plays around the country
 
It's wonderful, it's good to be happy
It's so easy to play, my sweet, tell me
Your swing, your taste, your tone
My heart races
 
Under the tree, beautiful morena
The drum, the rattle, they sing to the little girl
Under the tree, I call for an encore
The drum plays around the country
 
The song draws in those who hear it
A talent hunter in each song
The song is for everybody, including the Dancer God
Young person, old person turning into boys
 
Under the tree, beautiful morena
The drum, the rattle, they sing to the little girl
Under the tree, I call for an encore
The drum plays around the country
 
Swing, girl
 
Naughty!
 
  • 1. Morena: it refers, in an affectionate way, to those women with a darker skin.
Submitted by dowlenon1 on Sat, 01/09/2012 - 13:39
Added in reply to request by mitlenatch
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Portuguese

Debaixo do cacho

More translations of "Debaixo do cacho"
Portuguese → English - dowlenon1
5
Comments
Vimto12    Sat, 01/09/2012 - 17:41

Nice translation Regular smile
Some suggestions:
Verse 3, line 4: there's a typo 'races'
Verse 4, line 2: 'the rattle singS...'
Verse 5, line 1: perhaps 'envolver' could be translated by 'draws in/envelopes/absorbs...
Also what do you mean by 'talent hunter'?
Verse 5, line 5: 'young person/people, old person/people' maybe would sound smoother...

dowlenon1    Sat, 01/09/2012 - 18:42

Thank you for your nice suggestions Regular smile This song was really hard to be translated because there are a lot of regionalism. To tell the truth I don't know what she meant with 'talent hunter', it was literally translated. And I wrote 'sing' instead 'sings' because I meant 'the drum' and 'the rattle' SING (both of two) to the girl, so in this case wouldn't it be 'sing'?

Vimto12    Sat, 01/09/2012 - 18:50

Ahh yes then it would be 'sing', sorry I must've misread the line...
Also on the 'young person, old person' line would it be better to translate the second half of the line with 'turning into boys' to match the plurality of the first half?

dowlenon1    Sat, 01/09/2012 - 18:53

Ooops, of course... I changed the 'person' for 'people' and forgot changing the agreement (-s) Biggrin

Vimto12    Sat, 01/09/2012 - 18:57

And also get rid of the 'a' before 'boys' Wink smile

Vimto12    Sun, 02/09/2012 - 15:23

I just re-read this bit and I think to make it clearer you could maybe put 'the drum, the rattle, they sing...'
Also, I don't think you need the 'available' in 'the song is available for everybody' -it makes sense without it Regular smile

dowlenon1    Sun, 02/09/2012 - 20:46

Great, done Regular smile

Thanks again for you so nice suggestions and for your careful re-reading.

Vimto12    Sun, 02/09/2012 - 21:46

You're welcome Regular smile
I've realised it's much easier helping with already-done translations than working on your own Wink smile

mitlenatch    Tue, 04/09/2012 - 15:56

dowlenon1, thank you for translating this song!

There is one phrase that still confuses me, an english-only speaker: "arrastar a chinela". The translation to "drag on the ground our slipper" sounds funny in english. Is it a colloquial expression, sort of like the english expressions "shuffle your feet" or "shake a leg"? Do people say it when they want to dance?

Thanks again Regular smile

dowlenon1    Tue, 04/09/2012 - 23:39

Hi Mitlenatch,

I also thought it could sound a bit odd, but unfortunately I had not found any better translation. And yes, 'arrastar a chinela' is usually said by people who lives in rural areas and, in this case, invite others to dance. So, 'arrastar a chinela' alludes to the act of inviting to dance.

I still didn't know this expression: 'shake a leg', but I've just googled it and it nicely fits in the meaning. Thank you for your nice suggestion, if you've got other suggestions, please just tell me Regular smile

mitlenatch    Fri, 07/09/2012 - 17:31

Hi Lenon,

I guess 'arrastar a chinela' is just one of those regional expressions which doesn't translate well when taken word-for-word. However, you're explanation above makes it very clear. Thanks again for expanding my musical (and lyrical) universe! 8)

dowlenon1    Mon, 10/09/2012 - 13:16

Yes, that's right. You're welcome, but thanks to Nisah too, who helps with the corrections Regular smile