Abschied nehmen mit Gewalt (Bedeutung)

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In the Volkslied (c. 1800) "Morgen will mein Schatz verreisen" there's the line "Abschied nehmen mit Gewalt". I can't find any similar use of "mit Gewalt", and I'm not quite sure exactly what it means. Does it mean he's compelled to leave (i.e. it's his military duty), or he's got to go off armed, ready to use force, or that he's got force himself to leave, tear himself away?

The lyrics are here:

http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/Lieder/morgenwi.html

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It means he has to force himself to leave*; tear himself away; (or force himself to let her go*)

*(I.e., in the lyrics, (if they are all sung by the same person?) it says "Tomorrow my darling is leaving"; not: "Tomorrow, I have to leave my darling behind (and myself depart)", even though in the rest of the song, it sounds more like he's the one setting out for the New World, or stopping in port as a seaman in Hamburg, or whatever...)

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Yes, obviously there's a force acting on him to go, it's going to take mental strength on his part to force himself to leave, and it's all in a military setting with all its orders and so on. I just wonder if the literal meaning of the wording can be taken to apply to any one of them in particular.

German is probably quite particular, meticulous, about stating that something applies to oneself, so I would sort of expect some sort of reflexive construction if he's talking about tearing himself away.

Mm, I think he's worried the Hamburg girls might be prettier than his beloved – but they're not his chaste girl back home. But maybe I'm also not so sure about the last line – whom might his song of departure "verdrießen"?

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Here Gewalt means Force majeure - circumstances beyond one's control (they may be anything - military duty etc) There's an English verb which very precisely describes such a situation - to compel i.e. to bring about some action due to unexpected circumstances. I'd translate the first two lines (sticking to the historic period style) like this

Tomorrow my precious is leaving
Compelled to bid a farewell
Smile

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The term "mit Gewalt" in German is sometimes used in the sense of "unbedingt".
So it's like "er will unbedingt verreisen". -> he wants to leave, no matter what.

To me there is no sign in the lyrics showing he is going to the military, it seems more that, being from a small town, he wants to see the world and become a sailor.

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I repeat (because still no one else has addressed it!) the CHANGE OF VOICE which occurs between the first strophe, where the singer (the girl?) laments that tomorrow my darling is leaving - "departing on a journey"(i.e., the singer is being left behind!), and verses 4 and 5., where the singer - presumably a male -- talks about the girls in Hamburg, and (v.5) speaks of his love using the feminine pronoun - "SHE is the most beautiful one"
--Perhaps the song was originaly conceived of as a duet, with alternate verses being sung back and forth by the two lovers to each other?

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Tongue P.S. In order to transform it into a more contemporary phrase, namely a slogan for the Pacifist movement, all we need to do is switch out the preposition in the phrase, replacing "mit" with "von", viz:
-- "Abschied nehmen von Gewalt!"

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Looks like the lyrics at the link I posted above are the result of some sort of combination of folk songs (taken up by the military):

http://www.volksliederarchiv.de/morgen-will-mein-schatz-verreisen/
http://www.volksliederarchiv.de/hamburg-ist-ein-schoenes-staedtchen/

Of course, the military version is "Morgen *muss* mein Schatz verreisen"

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maluca wrote:
The term "mit Gewalt" in German is sometimes used in the sense of "unbedingt".
So it's like "er will unbedingt verreisen". -> he wants to leave, no matter what.

That's exactly what it means here.

"Mit Gewalt" can also mean "against all reason" ("er will das mit Gewalt nicht einsehen" = "he refuses to accept it against all reason" or "he stubbornly refuses to accept it ", often implying "against his own better judgment").
It's getting a bit out of fashion nowadays; my parents often used the phrase in that meaning.