The German language - questions, grammar, etc.

197 posts / 0 new
Novice
Joined: 04.07.2015

Servus, ich sitze gerade an einer Übersetzung und komme mit dem Satz

"I could never bare you to try an ease away" nicht so wirklich weiter. Wäre schön wenn mir da einer helfen könnte.

Moderator and guesslator
Joined: 25.02.2012

Könnte das möglicherweise "I could never bear you to try an easy way" sein?
"Ich könnte das nie ertragen, dass du einen leichten Weg/eine leichte Art und Weise ausprobieren/versuchen würdest." Oder "I could never bear you to try and ease away"? "Ich könnte das nie ertragen, dass du versuchen würdest, dich allmählich von mir zu distanzieren."

Novice
Joined: 04.07.2015

Möglich ist es sicherlich, aber im Text stand es so, und wenn ich die Lyrics auf anderen Seiten durchlese, steht dort auch "bare you"

Inhaltlich würde das zweite aber Sinn machen, also denke ich mal, dass das ursprünglich vielleicht einer falsch gehört hat, und andere das "bare" nur übernommen haben.

Auf jeden Fall danke für die Hilfe.

Editor
Joined: 28.01.2015

Und? Hast du es dir angehört? Und wenn ja: was wird deiner Meinung nach gesungen?

Novice
Joined: 04.07.2015

Für mich klingts auch nach "bare you" - allerdings würde ich mich bei sowas auch nicht unbedingt auf mich verlassen. Wenn ich dann allerdings sehe, das es überall als "bare" geschrieben wird... Wüsste nur nicht, was das dann bedeuten sollte.

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

bear und bare sind Homophone, zumindest in meiner Dialekt von amerikanishem Englisch.

Ich habe den Text gefunden und das Lied mir angehoert. Ich glaub es heisst: "I could never bear you to try and ease away." "ease away" heisst "leave quietly, slowly, or inconspicuously."

In dem Text steht auch noch was Falsches, naemlich: "loose" soll "lose" sein.

Ich habe den Songtext korrigiert.

Editor
Joined: 28.01.2015

Du glaubst nicht, wievielte fehlerhafte Songtexte im Internet kursieren, wieder und wieder mit denselben Fehlern kopiert... Da kann man dann froh sein, wenn es Muttersprachler gibt, die sich den Song anhören und ihn korrigieren!

Novice
Joined: 04.07.2015
Coopysnoopy wrote:

Du glaubst nicht, wievielte fehlerhafte Songtexte im Internet kursieren, wieder und wieder mit denselben Fehlern kopiert... Da kann man dann froh sein, wenn es Muttersprachler gibt, die sich den Song anhören und ihn korrigieren!

Na, in der hinsicht habe ich das zweifelhafte Talent auch in meiner Muttersprache mal was falsch zu verstehen ^^. Geht gerade bei ähnlichen Wörtern schnell und wenn mans dann einmal gehört hat, dann versteht man meist beim zweiten hören eh wieder das gleiche (weil das Gedächtnis sich das vom ersten mal gemerkt hat.

Jedenfalls, Danke euch beiden.

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

Okay, hier bin verwirrt. Es gibt so ein Lied, das "Verdammt guter Tag" heisst.

Die erste Zeile geht so: Was fuer'n verdammt guter Tag."

Also, Ich habe meine Deklinationtabelle gecheckt und ich kann's nicht verstehen, wie das sein kann. Es muss "was fuer'n verdammt gutEN Tag" heissen....oder? Das Nomen muss Akkusativ mit "fuer" sein, stimmt? Aber kann es sein, dass die Saenger einfach falsch ausgesprochen haben? Ich glaube sie sind Deutscher.

Lied: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjZhrTgwKjc

Editor - Sculptor of Language
Joined: 11.06.2015

"Was für ein verdammt guter Tag" =
What a damned good day
(meaning: Oh, such a damned good day)

What is the problem to understand this?

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011

I think the issue here is that "für" is not really used as a preposition in that sentence. "was für ein" is a grammaticalized phrase meaning "what a" - I don't know how it came to be that.
The case then is determined by the whole phrase. For example in "was für einen schönen Tag wir heute doch haben" ("what nice a day it is today"), it is accusative case since it's the direct object of "haben".

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

Thanks, that clears it up....that's confusing though. I know what it means but i would think whether it's really functioning as a preposition or not the normal preposition-case rules would apply.

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015
Sciera wrote:

The case then is determined by the whole phrase. For example in "was für einen schönen Tag wir heute doch haben" ("what nice a day it is today"), it is accusative case since it's the direct object of "haben".

Which means that the verb determines it:

"Was für einem Mann bist du gefolgt?" ("What (kind of) man did you follow?") - jemandeM folgen
"Was für einen Mann hast du gesehen?" ("What (kind of) man did you see?") - jemandeN sehen
"Was für ein Mann!" ("What a man!")

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

So, I'm thinking about translating this song: http://lyricstranslate.com/en/weird-al-yankovic-trapped-drive-thru-lyric...

And a lot of lines in this song have this kind of construction in them:

'm like, "No, I said 'delivered.'"
She's like, "I heard you say 'liver!'"
I'm like, "I should know what I said..."
She's like, "Whatever, I just don't want any liver!"

"I'm like" in this context means exactly the same thing as "I said". It's a very colloquial, spoken way of saying that, usually when telling a story. I think that usually the person is enunciating what is being said to mimic the mood/tone of what was said when that form is used.

I was wondering if there is a German equivalent? I really don't think so, but I figured I'd ask. Maybe not so much a one-to-one literal equivalent, but a way of speaking in the past tense like that.

Moderator of the Oceanic Realms
Joined: 22.04.2011

non-native here. But I would think "ich sag[t]e" would be an approximate translation for "I'm/[I was] like".

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015
Questionfinder wrote:

And a lot of lines in this song have this kind of construction in them:

'm like, "No, I said 'delivered.'"
She's like, "I heard you say 'liver!'"
I'm like, "I should know what I said..."
She's like, "Whatever, I just don't want any liver!"

[...]

I was wondering if there is a German equivalent?

Yes, that would be "ich so". Your example would be translated as:

"Ich so: '...' und sie so: '...'"

If this is in a dialogue, you can also alternate between "so" and "dann" ("then") or "wieder" ("again"):

"Ich so: '...' und sie dann: '...' und ich wieder: '..."

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

great! That's basically an exact equivalent...surprising!

Editor - Sculptor of Language
Joined: 11.06.2015

Sometimes, in rare occasions, you do find surprising similarities between german and english colloquial talk.
To translate a lyric that contains puns though is very seldomly possible, without losing the joke that's in it.
It almost always has the unsatisfactory effect like telling a joke starting with the punch. (so to say, telling it from the end)
That's mostly a sad story, and therefore I hate to have to do it...
:puzzled:

Moderator and guesslator
Joined: 25.02.2012

Is there a technical term for nouns that are made by just capitalizing adjectives, like Industrieller or Krimineller? I was trying to find a section on them in Duden Grammatik and I couldn't find it.

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011

I'd call that a "Substantivierung" or "Nominalisierung".

Super Member
Joined: 02.01.2013

May be you are looking for "substantivierte Adjektive"; you can find
a lot of examplesand explications in DUDEN grammar nr 960 - 2
Adjektive bilden dieAbleitung
or in the DUDEN Rechtschreibung R 65

o k. or more/otherquestions?
audiatur

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015
fulicasenia wrote:

Is there a technical term for nouns that are made by just capitalizing adjectives, like Industrieller or Krimineller? I was trying to find a section on them in Duden Grammatik and I couldn't find it.

I'm not sure these count since they are actual independent nouns.
IMO "Substantiviertes Adjektiv" is a case of creating a noun *that doesn't yet exist in the dictionary* from an adjective, such as "Schöner" ("pretty one") from "schön" ("pretty") or "Vielzitierter" ("often quoted one") from "vielzitiert" ("quoted often").

Moderator of the Oceanic Realms
Joined: 22.04.2011

Hi. I need help finding out what the meaning of "sitzt man im Trockenen" or "dann sitzen die auf dem Trockenen". I've come to the conclusion that it might mean something along the lines of "waiting it out"; like to wait for something to finish/complete and to see what happens.

Thanks in advance!

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011

I'd say "auf dem Trockenen sitzen" means "having to wait without getting information on what's the current state of affairs". So, your conclusion is quite close.

EDIT: Okay, Wiktionary lists some other shades of meaning: https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/auf_dem_Trockenen_sitzen
Yes, it can mean all those things as well.

Editor - Sculptor of Language
Joined: 11.06.2015

We need some context for that.

It rather more means: to be left without supplies

If Putin closes the gas-pipelines to Europe, dann sitzen wir auf dem Trockenen.
The idea for the idiom probably comes from closing water supplies for some people who live in a desert, or semi-desert.

Or closer:
A ship which finds itself all of a sudden stranded, without water unter its keel.
Yeah, to be stranded - that's the literal idea.

Editor /Languages Advocate
Joined: 18.10.2015

I may be wrong but I've a feel that rennen means to move faster than laufen (and possibly to some end in mind) like to dash and to run. It's like "I saw Peter run past me" and "I saw Peter dash past me". Laufen is much more neutral and may be applied to different things like time etc. while rennen is rather about physical movement. Sorry in case it's misleading. Regular smile

Editor
Joined: 28.01.2015

In Germany we say "Marathonlauf" and "Marathonrennen", so "laufen" and "rennen" mean the same; although there are some German dialekts like Schwäbisch for example. The Swabians say "laufen" and mean "gehen." But this is not Hochdeutsch.

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011

I wouldn't say they mean the same. "laufen" is basically "to jog" whereas "rennen" is "to run". It depends on the context; the distinction is not so clear cut, but "rennen" normally refers to something faster than "laufen".

The noun "Rennen" is different from that, it means "a race", even if it's a long-distance race where you would rather jog than run.

Editor - Sculptor of Language
Joined: 11.06.2015

Yes, Nadia, you are right.
"rennen" is to move as fast as you can, by foot. It is like "to sprint".
The thing is, that in common language "laufen", which in the strict sense of the word means "to jog", is (mistakenly) used for "walking", which is "gehen". So people say "laufen", when they should be saying "gehen".
"Wenn wir kein Fahrzeug haben, dann müssen wir eben laufen."

It is probably used, to make a difference, becaused "gehen" can also mean "to leave", or "to turn to some other place".
"Wenn wir bei Ihnen nicht bedient werden, dann müssen wir eben gehen."

Editor /Languages Advocate
Joined: 18.10.2015

Thanks for the explanation but it was this song that got me thinking http://lyricstranslate.com/en/rennen-nicht-laufen-run-dont-walk.html I read the song and I'd translate the title like "Dash, Not Just Run". Anyway, it helps me go ahead with my German. Thanks once again.:)

Editor /Languages Advocate
Joined: 18.10.2015

Thank you, guys! It daily makes me more confident at my yet poor German! I appreciate! Regular smile

Editor
Joined: 28.01.2015

Anschubsen

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015

Whereas "to drool over" as in "being very excited about something" would be "es läuft einem das Wasser im Munde zusammen".

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011

Exactly.

However, where has the comment with the question gone?
It's not even visible to me as a mod and it has disappeared from my notifications, too...

Is it still visible to you, magicmulder?

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015

No, I don't see it anymore either. Noticed that right away when I wanted to write my first reply. Maybe the user deleted it?

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011

Normally that would look different as it has replies. Also, is deleting available for users?
I now tried to delete my comment above, though, and it actually disappeared. So that might actually be what has happened.

Well, in case anyone is interested in it, I had written:

Quote:

In that context: "vollsabbern":
"Mein Hund hat meine Notizen vollgesabbert".

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

auf dem Trockenen sitzen

I was reading through the above discussion. dict.cc has "to leave someone high in dry" But there's also an even closer (literally speaking) equivalent "to be left out to dry"

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

ein paar Fragen:

Für ein Arsch: Ist das ein Idiom oder nicht, oder hängt das vom Kontext ab?

Und in dieser Strophe

Zu feiern die göttliche Hochzeit
Den großen leuchtenden Baldur
Dessen Wärme und Heil wieder Einzug hält
Seine Herrschaft über die Midgard-Welt

Gehen die letzte zwei Zeilen zusammen? Und was bedeutet das wenn's so ist?

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011
Quote:

Für ein Arsch: Ist das ein Idiom oder nicht, oder hängt das vom Kontext ab?

Ich denke, du meinst "für'n Arsch" oder "für den Arsch". Im Normalfall ist das ein Idiom.

Quote:

Gehen die letzte zwei Zeilen zusammen? Und was bedeutet das wenn's so ist?

Durch das Fehlen von Kommas ist das ambig.
Wenn am Ende der 3. Zeile ein Komma steht, bedeutet es

"To celebrate the divine wedding,
(and to celebrate) the great shining Baldur,
whose warmth and salvation arrive again,
(and to celebrate) his rulership over the Midgard-world"

Wenn das Kommas vor dem "wieder" in der 3. Zeile steht, bedeutet es

"...
his warmth and salvation,
his rulership over the Midgard-world arrives again"

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015

> Für ein Arsch: Ist das ein Idiom oder nicht, oder hängt das vom Kontext ab?

"Das ist für den Arsch" / "Das ist für'n Arsch" = "that's all in vain".

"Was für ein Arsch!" = "What an asshole!"

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015

> Wenn das Kommas vor dem "wieder" in der 3. Zeile steht

Das wäre dann aber etwas ungeschicktes Deutsch.
Als normaler Satz mit Satzzeichen würde das so aussehen:

"Zu feiern die göttliche Hochzeit (und) den großen leuchtenden Baldur, dessen Wärme und Heil wieder Einzug hält, (und) seine Herrschaft über die Midgard-Welt."

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011
Quote:

> Wenn das Kommas vor dem "wieder" in der 3. Zeile steht

Das wäre dann aber etwas ungeschicktes Deutsch.

Eher altertümelnd, würde ich sagen, was ja zum Text passen täte.

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015

Ah OK, beim vierten Lesen habe ich begriffen, wie es gemeint war. Ja, richtig. Regular smile

Moderator der Fragenfinder
Joined: 16.09.2014

In this song: http://lyricstranslate.com/en/wizo-wahrheit-lyrics.html

What does "Ne, ne" in the refrain mean? When I first heard it, I thought he was saying "naehmlich"...

Moderator / hippie-abraça-árvore
Joined: 30.04.2014

It means "Nein, nein".

Editor (Resident Evil)
Joined: 26.10.2015

... with an implied "oh you're *so* wrong".

Pages