How would you translate this line in Serbian

17 posts / 0 new
Guest
Pending moderation

Hi, I'm working on learning Serbian/Croatian through Music

Anyway, the song is Beograd by Elitni Odredi and the line in question is "Što smo se rastali Beograd zna" and the user who translated the song to English said it means "Why did we grow apart Belgrade knows" but I just want to make sure this is right. Could you also say "Only Belgrade knows why we grew apart?"

Thanks in advance and expect more questions like this haha

Translator/Interpreter
Joined: 14.10.2016

I'm not fluent in Serbo-Croatian, but I think that both are acceptable translations. The first is a bit more literal, while the second is more poetic.

Super Member
Joined: 18.09.2016

Hi!
I'm a Serbo-Croatian native speaker, speciffically I speak both languages as my natives.
I know about that song and I like it very much Regular smile
Well, there is a fact about pronoun 'Što' which is used differently in Serbian and differently in Croatian. In Serbian language it usually means 'why', while in Croatian it means only 'what'.
So: 'Što smo se rastali Beograd zna' -> Serbian
in Croatian we'd translate: 'Zašto smo se rastali, Beograd zna'.

Regarding its context, I'd translate:
'Belgrade knews why did we move apart.'
OR: 'Why did we move apart, knows only Belgrade.'

With best regards from Montenegro and with hope in your success!
Stefan

Guest

Hvala vam Stefan! I also really like the song. It's a slow journey but I'm really excited to start learning!

Guest
crimsonDyname wrote:

I'm not fluent in Serbo-Croatian, but I think that both are acceptable translations. The first is a bit more literal, while the second is more poetic.

May I ask how you began learning this language? In my experience there aren't a lot of resources, not common languages for people to want to learn

Super Member
Joined: 18.09.2016

EN: You're welcome! I wish you a great success!
HR: Nema na čemu! Želim Vam puno uspjeha!
СР: Нема на чему! Желим Вам много успеха!

Stefan / Стефан

P.S. When you talk to someone, and you say his name, you don't use nominative case, you use vocative case!
So, it would be correctly: 'Hvala Vam, Stefane!'
(The vocative ending for masculin gender is most commonly -e, or -u)

Guest

Oh so if someone was talking to me, would it be Isake or Isaku? Thanks for telling me! I still have a lot to learn Regular smile

Super Member
Joined: 18.09.2016

Croatian: Isače
Serbian: Izače
We also have consonant changes Tongue smile
Consonant 'k' most commonly becomes 'č' when it is found in front of the vowel 'e'. This is called 'palatalizacija' (palatalisation)
Also notice that Croatian leaves foreign names in its own form, while Serbian changes them to make it be read just as it is written.
I hope you still want to learn these languages Tongue smile
Best regards,
Stefan

Guest

Wow that is confusing! :p I do still want to learn, I think it would be a good challenge

Super Member
Joined: 18.09.2016
Agronak gro-Malog wrote:

Wow that is confusing! :p I do still want to learn, I think it would be a good challenge

Yes, you won't regret any minute spent learning it Wink smile
Have a great success!

Guest

Hvala very much haha. It'll be hard, since right now I know only a few words but that's okay. Its worth it I think

Translator/Interpreter
Joined: 14.10.2016

I've studied it through music, of course, and also this software called "Instant Immersion" that I quite like.

Guest

I'll have to see if I can look into that software. Anything else you recommend?

Translator/Interpreter
Joined: 14.10.2016

Not really. I'm lucky enough to have a few Serbian and Bosnian friends around. Failing that, just listen to Serbian music non-stop. I recommend Zeljko Joksimovic, Marija Serifovic, and Knez as artists.

Guest

Ah, I know of them from Eurovision. Thank you!

Super Member
Joined: 18.09.2016

Knez sings in Montenegrin Regular smile

Junior Member
Joined: 10.04.2017

In Serbian, both "što" and "zašto" are used as "why" - "što" being shortened from "zašto". Also, "zašto" is a bit more formal. "what" is "šta".

I would translate this verse as "Why did we part, Belgrade knows" or "Why had we parted, Belgrade knows". This translation is both literal and poetic. "GROW apart" implies some period of time of growing apart - and here we have a finite verb - we PARTED in one moment in time, it's a decision, an action that occurred once in the past. It is not specified if ONLY Belgrade knows WHY we parted... So I wouldn't use "only" if I wished to completely preserve the whole meaning with all its implications and connotations.