Francis Cabrel - Je te suivrai (English translation)

English translation

I will follow you

There are several meters of water in the streets of my suffering
Several tons of mud in the stream of my veins
The river washes away the telephone wires
With my calls still resonating within
 
The rain has faded all the words I dream up
The birds cried out so that you wouldn’t hear me
In the places where you were there are pieces of ice
And trees bar the way to prevent my passing
Wherever you go I will follow you
I will follow you…
 
Even when you’ve closed your hundred doors
Even when you’ve wept for another’s children
Even when you’ve extinguished that which burnt the brightest
Even if you go further than my eyes can see
Wherever you go I will follow you
I will follow you…
 
Even in the deepest silence
I still hear you telling me
We are approaching the sky
Our closed books sway
I don’t want to fall alone
I don’t want to fall alone
 
If you want I’ll even like those who touch you
Those who still have your taste filling their mouth
Even those who you hate, even those you love
There is so much water in the streets of my suffering
Wherever you go I will follow you
I will follow you…
 
I still hear you telling me
We are approaching the sky
I don’t want to fall alone
I don’t want to fall alone
 
Snow has fell on every window sill
Of this hazy town. Ought to forget you...
How many more winters will pass under my door
Before I dare one day to say that I love someone else
 
Submitted by Gavier on Tue, 04/04/2017 - 14:26
Last edited by Gavier on Tue, 30/05/2017 - 13:44
French

Je te suivrai

Comments
petit élève    Fri, 26/05/2017 - 15:51

quand tu auras -> that's "past in future" ("futur antérieur" in French, can't remember how you call that in English), so I'd rather say "even after..." or "even once..."

ce qui brûlait de mieux -> that's pretty unusual, but I understand it as "the best among blazing things", i.e. "the most passionate part of yourself" or something like that

still have your taste still filling their mouth -> a single "still" should be enough, I think Regular smile

Il a neigé partout aux rebords des fenêtres
De cette ville floue ne plus te connaître -> There must be a point after "floue" for the French to make sense.
That's a peculiar rhythm, but the effect is rather nice.
"Snow fell on every window sill of this hazy town. Ought to forget you" or something like that,

Gavier    Tue, 30/05/2017 - 09:36

You're right about the tense except that - we just don't really use that in English. We don't worry about the agreement of the tenses in quite the same way as the French so when talking about something that "will have" happened in the future we just use the perfect tense. I can see why it sounds wrong to a French ear but trust me on this. Even once you have / Even when you have - these sound pretty much the same to an English speaker.

It's like we don't say "I will pay you when you will have finished" . We just say "...when you have finished"

Ah I see - I think "burnt the brightest" would capture that sense well!

Thanks - that last verse didn't feel quite right. :-)

petit élève    Tue, 30/05/2017 - 11:27

Thanks for clearing that up. I'm not quite comfortable with the future (nowadays, who is, really?)