Sektor Gaza - Kusok (Кусок) (English translation)

Russian

Kusok (Кусок)

Мне было нечего делать, умирал от тоски,
С похмелья кровь давила сильно на мои виски,
И похмелиться было не за что — в кармане «голяк»,
Соседи тоже не дают, хоть я крутил их так и сяк.
 
Залез в кладовку я, в надежде чтоб чего-нибудь загнать,
Я стал копаться в своём хламе, не с похмелья ж помирать,
Мне на глаза попался старый грязный потный носок,
И в нём нашёл я старый, ранее заначенный «кусок».
 
Зачем родной я до инфляции тебя зажал,
Зачем тебя в носке держал?!
Да лучше б я за счёт тебя неделю круто пил,
Но я в натуре про тебя забыл!
 
Я в своё время за тебя мешки большие грузил,
Я за тебя могилы и траншеи сутками рыл,
Недоедал, недопивал, за что и язву схватил,
Я за тебя бл., для себя бл., ничего не купил!
 
Зачем родной я до инфляции тебя зажал,
Зачем тебя в носке держал?!
Да лучше б я с тобой с друзьями лихо покутил,
Но я в натуре про тебя забыл!
 
От злости бью я по своей и так больной голове,
От злости я отгрыз все пуговицы на рукаве,
Теперь тобою можно кое-что подтереть,
Теперь тебя можно трубкой скрутить и кое-куда вздеть.
 
Зачем родной я до инфляции тебя зажал,
Зачем тебя в носке держал?!
Да лучше б я с тобой чувиху в ресторан сводил,
Но я в натуре про тебя забыл!
 
Зачем родной я до инфляции тебя зажал,
Зачем тебя в носке держал?!
Да лучше б я с тобой чувиху в ресторан сводил,
Но я в натуре про тебя забыл!
 
Submitted by SaintMark on Mon, 29/05/2017 - 16:57
Align paragraphs
English translation

The Grand

I had nothing to do, I was dying of anguish,
I had a hangover, my blood hammered in my temples,
I couldn't take the hair of the dog, because I had nothing in my pockets,
Albeit I asked my neighbors for money, they didn't give me this.
 
Hoping to find anything for sale, I went to my storeroom,
I began to look over my junk. I didn't want to die of hangover.
I saw an old, dirty, and sweaty sock,
And I found in this one thousand old Soviet rubles *, that was stashed a long time ago.
 
My dear grand, why I didn't spend you before the inflation?
Why did I stash you in a sock?!
Yeah, it would have been better if I'd had a nice booze on you for a week,
But I really forgot about you!
 
I loaded big bags for you in those times,
I digged many graves ang trenches for you in many days time,
I restricted myself in food and drink, I got an ulcer because of this,
Fuck, I didn't buy with you anything for myself!
 
My dear grand, why I didn't spend you before the inflation?
Why did I stash you in a sock?!
Yeah, it would have been better if I'd went clubbing with my friends on you,
But I really forgot about you!
 
I hit my already aching head in anger,
I bit off all the buttons on my sleeve,
Using you, I can now wipe up - guess what,
Now I can roll you up and shove in somewhere.
 
My dear grand, why I didn't spend you before the inflation?
Why did I stash you in a sock?!
Yeah, it would have been better if I'd went to restaurant with a girlfriend on you,
But I really forgot about you!
 
My dear thousand rubles, why I didn't spend you before the inflation?
Why did I stash you in a sock?!
Yeah, I'd better go to restaurant with a girlfriend by you,
But I really forgot about you!
 
Submitted by k_mironov on Sat, 06/01/2018 - 17:18
Added in reply to request by SaintMark
Last edited by k_mironov on Wed, 10/01/2018 - 14:18
Author's comments:

* This song tells about one of the realities of the 1990s in Russia and other CIS countries, when savings in Soviet rubles of many people was depreciated due to hyperinflation after the collapse of the USSR.

Idioms from "Kusok (Кусок)"
See also
Comments
Brat    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 15:32

Oh, that's a nice song, and here are my suggestions:

1. "Кусок" will be "a grand", so the title should be translated as "The Grand".

S1L2 my blood put pressure on the temples,-> it's pretty good, though they usually say like "blood hammered in my temples"
S1L4 Albeit I asked my neighbors for money, they didn't give me this.->My neighbours didn't give me a dime [a copeck], albeit I asked them in all kinds of ways,

S2L1 Hoping to find anything for sale, I went to my larder,->Hoping to find anything for sale, I went to my storeroom, (because larders are usually used to store food)
S2L2 to die from the hangover.->to die of hangover.
S2L3 I saw an old, dirty, and sweaty sock,->My eyes caught an old, dirty, and sweaty sock,
S2L4 And I found in this one thousand old Soviet rubles *->And I found an old [depreciated] grand in it

S3L1 My dear thousand rubles, why I didn't spend you before the inflation?->My dear, why hadn't I spent you before the inflation began?
S3l2 in the sock?!->in a sock (meaning the storage method, basically) Regular smile
S3L3 Yeah, I'd better fine booze by you for a week,->Yeah, it would have been better if I'd had a nice booze on you for a week, (these corrections should be applied to all the following refrains, and Line3 should serve as a pattern for the altering third lines of the following refrains)

S4L2 I digged many graves ang trenches for you in many days time,->I was digging graves ang trenches for you round-the-clock,
S4L4 buy with you->buy on you

S5L3 - According to the pattern provided in S3L3

S6L1 I hit my already aching head in anger,
S6L2 I bited off all buttons on a sleeve shirt,-> I bit off all the buttons on my sleeve,
S6L3 Now I can wipe off something, guess what,->Using you, I can now wipe up - guess what,
S6L4 Now I can you roll up and shove in somewhere.->Now I can roll you up and shove in somewhere.

S7L3 - According to the pattern provided in S3L3

BTW, I've found that there are 2 links to "the hair of the dog" idiom below your translation. That happened because you added your interpretation http://lyricstranslate.com/en/hair-dog-0 without seeing it already had this one http://lyricstranslate.com/en/hair-dog added by Kostenzie on 11.02.2013 and explained by Phoenix_Rising on Tue, 12/02/2013.

So you'd better merge your explanation with the previously existed idiom entry. Wink smile

Gavin    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 14:59

Guys - "dug" not "digged". Digged does not exist Regular smile

magicmulder    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 15:03

It does, but it's considered outdated, like saying "I have errands to run" instead of "I'm busy". Wink smile

Gavin    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 15:23

Archaic rather than just outdated I would say. I'd happily still say "I have errands to run" Regular smile
But yes, it was once used but is not correct contemporary English.

magicmulder    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 15:47

So do I, after watching too many episodes of True Blood. Teeth smile

Brat    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 15:33

Thanx! It should have been "was digging". Regular smile
And "many" is a redundant word here...

Brat    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 15:50

Of course, the author has nothing in common with Shakespeare, that was only my wandering eye to blame. Regular smile

SaintMark    Mon, 08/01/2018 - 16:59

the english of most russians is crude, but it does the job.
making a perfect translation from such a one is very little work
compared to trying to get a very first translation from a song
that is nowhere on the internet translated to any language whatsoever.
and you, as a guy who hardly understands russian,
break your brains trying to wrap your head around it.

k_mironov    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 10:15

Can I use a word "Grand" with any currency, not only with US dollars?

magicmulder    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 10:35

Depends on the context. If you say "five grand", the context should already make it clear whether you're talking about Euros or rubles, otherwise the reader will assume you're talking about dollars. And you wouldn't say "five grand Euros" ever. Wink smile

DarkJoshua    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 10:50

Actually "grand" is used in the UK to refer to one thousand pounds, while the word "quid" is used to refer to 1 pound. It's slang and, apparently, quite widespread, so I don't think it would sound strange at all to use it in context speaking about other currencies.

tdwarms    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 10:54

A "grand" can also be used to refer to one thousand Canadian dollars.

Brat    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 11:58

Yes, it's a pretty widespread slangism that is usually clearly understood when speaking about money. Wink smile
It's applicable to any currency if it's clear enough in the context. It's a full synonym of the Russian "штука" and "кусок".

tdwarms    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 12:07

Yeah, both answers are technically correct. Regular smile Magicmulder is right that one wouldn't say, "five grand Euros," but on the other hand no one would say "five grand dollars" either. It'd just be "five grand" either way. The context will determine the specific type of currency, but in English "a grand" means "one thousand" when referring to money.

tdwarms    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 12:12

Incidentally, this is also where the slang term "G" comes from, which you can often hear in rap. "I got 50 Gs" -> "I have 50,000 dollars." Regular smile

magicmulder    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 14:38

That was what I meant. Regular smile It's the same in the US.
I also habitually say "10 bucks" (AE for "10 dollars") which I hope is understood as "10 EUR" in the EU since the exchange rate is pretty close to 1:1. Saves me the trouble of changing my words depending on the audience.

Brat    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 17:33

One friend of mine says "10 yukes" when he speaks about the euro. Regular smile Maybe that comes from his Scottish origin? Regular smile

DarkJoshua    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 17:46

They use the pound in Scotland and to refer to 10 pounds, they would say "tenner" ("fiver" for 5 pounds). At least that's what I've been told, in England I've always heard only 5 or 10 quids. Not really sure where that "yukes" come from.

Brat    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 18:28

That may come from the allergy sometimes happening when handling euro cent coins. Or may it be something else... I'll ask my friend if he knows...

tdwarms    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 18:28

Perhaps it's something specific to the friend? I rather like it. Regular smile

Brat    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 18:35

I also suspect something alike. Regular smile

Gavin    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 23:48

Never heard that but I would guess the "yukes" = "Euro bucks".

Ah, pounds, tenner, fiver etc common throughout all the UK, not just Scotland.
Quid is popular sure, but never "quids". A tenner = ten quid.

Regular smile

tdwarms    Thu, 11/01/2018 - 00:16

Always singular then? Good to know. Regular smile

Brat    Thu, 11/01/2018 - 13:22

Don't forget about the idiomatic "quids in". Wink smile And sometimes they can design an unusual sentence that won't be grammatically incorrect though having 'quids' in plural...

Gavin    Thu, 11/01/2018 - 14:35

Yes that's true - but that is really the only time. We would never say anything like "give me five quids". Or "five grands" for that matter.

DarkJoshua    Thu, 11/01/2018 - 09:26

Yeah, you're right, I misspelled it, whoops. I heard somewhere that 'tenner" and "fiver" aren't just restricted to Scotland, but I've never heard that in England, that's why.

Brat    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 18:41

Ah, my friend said: "I got it from our boozies and I don't know where it comes from but neither do I give a fudge to it, may it be whatsoever anything you like" Regular smile

magicmulder    Wed, 10/01/2018 - 23:34

"Yukes" sounds like a portmanteau of "Euro" and "yikes". Wink smile