The Book (Libar)

English translation

The Book

Inscribe me in the Book of your debts
’cause I’ve been buying you for a long while
with what you wanted to hear -
out of fear that it will sink, your love for me,
like a bee in a spoon full of tea
while trying to not lose breath.
I have no reasons to be scared.
 
(Chorus:)
I’m giving you verses and tones
all my iridescent pearls – to be a gift.
I can still make you fall for me with the poem
shrewdly and with flatter
I still can fool you with love.
 
And I will promise you anything
Indeed, everything you want –
my skin, my bone
and whichever face you’ll have wished
out of fear that it will sink, your love for me,
like a bee in a spoon full of tea
while trying to not lose breath.
I have no reasons to be scared.
 
(Chorus:)
I’m giving you verses and tones
all my iridescent pearls – to be a gift.
I can still make you fall for me with the poem
shrewdly and with flatter
I still can fool you with
love...
love...
 
~ Chorus repeated ~
 
I still can
I still can fool you with
love...
Love...
 
(Lyrics in The "Fairy" language:)
 
Teh mahi seva hileyda
Suna heya, sun deya pejee
Leysun datuversa unmeyola
Jom tisela behsuda
Leysun datuversa unmeyola heyda.
 
Submitted by nenad.ilic.3597 on Thu, 03/01/2013 - 19:26
Author's comments:

The lyrics is a poem and should not be understood literally, but according to its overall poetic meaning; hence, I translated the verse: "Još uvjek mogu ti podvaliti ljubav" as: "I still can fool you with love" and not "deceive you by faking love". While "trick you into love" does convey the positive meaning of this deception, to an extent, in the original, it's his (the narrator's) side of love (aimed to her) that is signified here, not vice-versa.

This translation is supported by the verse: " OUT OF fear that it will sink -your love for me", suggesting that the narrator, being terrified from losing his beloved's love one day, is willing to make an extra effort and, if that's what is necessary, even "fake" love with the gestures of deep caring (I'll be anything you want, even if that's not who I am when I'm without you). Now, it's her turn to give back in response to these sweet games, and that is why she's indebted to him.

The words: "I have no reasons to be scared" are repeated at the end of each stanza as magical words that the narrator hopes have a power to make everything all right.

Additional comments:
The word 'libar' is not a Slavic word, but adopted in Dalmatia from Italian, and it comes from Latin: liber, the book. The Slavic (Croatian, Serbian) word is: knjiga. Likewise, the word 'verse' (plural, sigular: versa), which in these two languages is: stihovi, meaning verses, has the same origin.

The additional lyrics, sung by the band 'Putokazi' from Rijeka, is in the imaginary language "of elves and fairies" Smile

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