Who Has the Right?

French

Qui a le droit

 

On m’avait dit : tu poses pas trop de questions.
Tu sais, petit, c’est la vie qui te répond
A quoi ça sert de vouloir tout savoir ?
Regarde dans l’air et vois ce que tu peux voir.

On m’avait dit : il faut écouter son père.
Le mien a rien dit quand il s’est fait la paire.
Maman m’a dit : t’es trop petit pour comprendre
Et j’ai grandit avec une place à prendre.

Qui a le droit ? Qui a le droit ?
Qui a le droit de faire ça ?
A un enfant qui croit vraiment
Ce que dissent les grands.
On passe sa vie à dire merci
Merci à qui ? A quoi ?
A faire la pluie et le beau temps
Pour des enfants à qui l’on ment.

On m'avait dit que les hommes sont tous pareils.
Y a plusieurs dieux, mais y a qu'un seul soleil.
Oui mais, l'soleil il brille ou bien il brûle.
Tu meurs de soif ou bien tu bois des bulles.

A toi aussi, j' suis sûr qu'on t'en a dit,
De belles histoires, tu parles... que des conneries !
Alors maintenant, on s'retrouve sur la route,
Avec nos peurs, nos angoisses et nos doutes.

Qui a le droit, qui a le droit,
Qui a le droit d' faire ça
A un enfant qui croit vraiment
C'que disent les grands ?
On passe sa vie à dire merci,
Merci à qui, à quoi ?
A faire la pluie et le beau temps
Pour des enfants à qui l'on ment.

Try to align
English

Who Has the Right?

Versions: #1#2#3

They told me, “Don’t ask yourself too many questions;
You know, little one, it’s life that answers you.
What good is it wanting to know everything?
Look up and see what you can see.”

They told me we had to listen to our fathers
But mine didn’t say anything when he cleared off.
Maman told me, “You are too little to understand”
And I grew up with a place to take.

Who has the right? Who has the right?
Who has the right to do this
To a child who truly believes
What the grownups say?
We spend our life saying thank you—
Thank you to whom? For what?
For dictating the rain and good weather
For the children that they lie to.

They told me that men were all alike.
There are many gods, but only one sun!
Yes, but the sun, it shines or it burns.
You die of thirst or you drown.

You too, I’m sure they told you this,
Beautiful stories, you say—what rubbish!
Well now, we find each other on the way
With our fears, our anguish, and our doubts.

Who has the right? Who has the right?
Who has the right to do this
To a child who truly believes
What the grownups say?
We spend our life saying thank you—
Thank you to whom? For what?
For dictating rain and good weather
For the children that they lie to.

Submitted by Ravariel on Tue, 24/01/2012 - 03:06
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Jean klaude MLC2 years 17 weeks
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Jean klaude MLC2 years 17 weeks
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Comments
    August 24th, 2012

Tu sais petite c’est la vie qui te reponde ->
(1) there is a typo in the original lyrics (répond), so it's present tense (it's the life that answers you)
(2) "petite" designates a person ("little one") but it should read "petit" since it's a little boy the song is about.

ecouter son pere-> just *one's* own father (singular). The next line is about the singer's father, that's why he says "le mien" (*my* own father)

A un enfant-> to a child (singular)

A faire la pluie et les beaux temps -> strange, in the usual saying it's "le beau temps". I suspect a typo, since this variant has no alternative meaning I can think of. Whatever, it's an idiom meaning "to be in total control", "impose one's will on others" (like God having the power to decide when the rain will fall).

The lyrics are rather a mess after this point. Typos, wrong or missing parts... If you're interrested I could find a proper version and we could continue this exercise of mutual learning Smile

Ravariel     August 24th, 2012

Yes, the lyrics are disastrously typed out at the end. I looked up a different version as I translated to check those parts, but it still drives me nuts to no end...there should be commas around that "petit" then, to indicate that it's addressing someone? That's how it would be in English, anyways.

I understand what you mean with "ecouter son pere," but I did do that part on purpose. It was singular in the original, but I pluralized it to avoid having to use an unnecessary gendered pronoun (everyone has to listen to *his* father, which can sound jarring) while still retaining the distinct contrast between the general (one's father) and the specific (but mine.)

Oops on the pluralization there. I am not a very careful person, unfortunately.

Hmm...I figured that was what "making rain and good weather" meant, even when I was translating it literally. But it would be more correct to use the idiomatic translation, then?

    August 24th, 2012

You're right about the commas, but they just tend to be eaten by gremlins on their way to lyrics sites.

Quote:
I pluralized it to avoid having to use an unnecessary gendered pronoun
My bad. I didn't thought that was a possibility. Thanks, you just improved my English a bit!

When I saw a direct translation of the rain and sunshine thing, I thought you might not have known this idiom. Since this expression is very usual, I think the best would be to pick something equally usual in English. But it's your language, so who am I to say what's best, really Smile.

About lyrics, if you manage to find a proper version, just PM them to me and I'll put them where they belong.

Jean klaude MLC     August 24th, 2012
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