Unicorn

French (Old French)

Unicorne

 

Ausi conme unicorne sui
qui s esbahist en regardant,
quant la pucele va mirant.
Tant est liee de son ennui,
pasmee chiet en son giron.

Dame, quant je devant vous fui
et je vous vi premierement,
mes cuers aloit si tressaillant
qu il vous remest, quant je m en mui.

Ausi conme unicorne sui
qui s esbahist en regardant,
quant la pucele va mirant.
Tant est liee de son ennui,
pasmee chiet en son giron.

Lors fu menez sanz raencon
en la douce chartre en prison

Dame, quant je ne sai guiler,
merciz seroit de seson mes
de soustenir si greveus fes.
de soustenir si greveus fes.

Ausi conme unicorne sui
qui s esbahist en regardant,
quant la pucele va mirant.
Tant est liee de son ennui,
pasmee chiet en son giron.

See video
Try to align
English

Unicorn

Versions: #1#2

I am just like the unicorn
that, while looking, gets frightened,
when it considers the Maiden.
It is so glad of its discomfort,
that it falls helpless in its lap;

Lady, when I stood before you
and I saw you for the first time,
my heart trembled such a way,
that it stayed with you, when I left.

I am just like the unicorn
that, while looking, gets frightened,
when it considers the Maiden.
It is so glad of it's discomfort,
that it falls helpless in its lap;

Then it was brought, without redemption,
in the sweet dungeon, held a prisoner.

Lady, since I cannot delude,
might mercy be used at this time,
to make, so large a burden, bearable.
to make, so large a burden, bearable.

I am just like the unicorn
that, while looking, gets frightened,
when it considers the Maiden.
It is so glad of it's discomfort,
that it falls helpless in its lap;

Submitted by TrampGuy on Sun, 10/03/2013 - 22:51
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Comments
licorna.din.vis     March 29th, 2013

Thank you for translating this and for submitting this song, when I saw it I was like "OMG, a song about a unicorn, I gotta translate it!"

Oh, and I have a small suggestion: it should be "her discomfort" and "her lap"because it refers to the maiden who gets nervous and in whose lap the unicorn falls asleep.

TrampGuy     March 29th, 2013

Haha...yes, it certainly fits you Smile
and the translation is not mine, I don't even know old French - so maybe I'll just leave it as the source says.

licorna.din.vis     March 29th, 2013

Yes, I know it's not yours, you're honest enough to mention the source but I took a look at the French translation (I don't know old French either, it looks slightly like Modern French) and this is what it says. It's up to you if you change it or not but I just thought we might improve it Smile

TrampGuy     March 29th, 2013

Actually, now that I look at it - even though my French is rusty as hell, I think "son" is a reflexive pronoun (or whatever it's called - I'm not that big on grammar either Smile), which makes the current translation pretty accurate. It might not be the best translation, but I think it passes the correct meaning.

Calusarul     March 29th, 2013

Licorna, why do find horses with a horn on their forehead so attractive? I mean, horses without horns are fine by my standards Tongue

licorna.din.vis     March 29th, 2013

Căluşarul, always the funny guy!

I do like horses and all kinds of animals and birds (I feed sparrows and pigeons everyday on my window sill, I feed and pet stray dogs and cats and even talk to them-the postman heard me once or twice and probably thinks I'm mad Laughing out loud ) and I like insects too, especially butterflies and ladybugs, and I even used to save bees from drowning when I went to the countryside.
But I also like everything that has to do with the fantastic world because it’s like an escape from the harsh reality we live in and I’m particularly fond of creatures like unicorns, elves, fairies, talking animals (puss in boots is my favourite) that are impersonations of good, purity, wisdom and have magic powers.
Oh, it's already midnight in Romania, I should have gone to bed before the spell broke Tongue

Calusarul     March 30th, 2013

Hmm... I used to read film credits and I always liked it when it said : "This film is based on actual events". I used to read fairy tales when I was a child, but later on, I couldn't watch films like "The Lord of the Rings" or "Harry Potter".

TrampGuy     March 30th, 2013

Dude, watch Harry Potter! Laughing out loud

Calusarul     March 30th, 2013

I'm too old for Harry Potter. It ran several times on television channels, but I didn't have the patience to watch more than 10 minutes.
I prefer realistic movies, dramas, documentaries. But I also appreciate unrealistic films that have a (higher) meaning: Wall-e, Delicatessen, Dzift.
It's like in music: I don't hate dance (entertaining) music, but I prefer to music that comes from the heart.

    March 31st, 2013

As I see it, Harry Potter comes from the heart. The story and characters are more subtle than they can appear at first glance. Try to read the books and I hope you'll enjoy that.

Calusarul     March 31st, 2013

As someone else said, I haven't got to finish reading Dostoevsky Laughing out loud But maybe I'll give it a try some time. Hopefully, art and entertainment are large enough for all of us and we'll never get bored if we keep on learning new things.

    March 29th, 2013

Gramatically speaking, "son" could refer to the unicorn or the maiden as well (in French it varies according to the thing owned, not the owner).
In this context, I think it's the maiden's discomfort the song talks about.

TrampGuy     March 29th, 2013

Well then, since it can be both, and the person who did it chose one option over the other - I'll just leave it as is.

    March 29th, 2013

Mmm... I'm pretty sure it's the maiden's lap the unicorn falls in. In the folk tale, the unicorn falls unconscious into the maiden's lap and eventually gets caught by hunters.
As for the discomfort, well I cannot be sure because the Old French is not 100% clear to me, but I would assume it's the unicorn's stare that causes trouble/discomfort to the maiden, so "her" would seem more logical to me here too.

TrampGuy     March 29th, 2013

Makes better sense to me too, but since the other option is also possible, I'd prefer not to tamper with the source. If you wish to upload your own version, I'd gladly take this one down Smile.

    March 29th, 2013

I bet the translator wasn't aware of the folk tale.
I would at least add a footnote, so that a casual reader could enjoy the song without having to scratch his/her head on the 1st verse Smile.

edit:

OK, I'll do my own version then. Just give me some time to muster my fake old English Big smile

TrampGuy     March 29th, 2013

Haha... great! Laughing out loud

    March 29th, 2013

Nicely done!
Would be 5 stars if not for the "its/her" controversy Smile