Leïla Huissoud - Les Cocus (traduction en anglais)

français

Les Cocus

J'écris sur les amants perdus
Je fredonne pour les amants foutus
Je chante les amours cocus
 
Je danse pour celui d'un soir
Je joue pour celui dans le placard
Regarde et rougir ma guitare
 
Éloignez vous les fleurs bleus
Ceux qui veulent pas causer trottoir
Je vous compterai pas d'amour heureux
Si vous êtes seuls, lâchez vos bougeoirs
 
Les amoureux du bal perdu
Personne nous dit ce qu'ils sont devenus
Les seuls qui n'ont pas cessé de s'aimer
Sont Montaigu et Capulet
À croire qu'il faut vivre enterrer
Pour ne jamais se tromper
 
Je vous demanderai de vous remémorer
Quelques uns de vos fantasmes passés
Avant de courir a l'église au bras de votre moitié
 
C'est vrai c'est intime ces histoires
Mais plus de pudeur dans nos mémoires
Au fond ce serait tous frères et sœurs
Si on avait le même facteur
 
Pardon si ma main exagère,
Elle écrit et prise de colère,
Aimez vous a la folie
Vos deux personnes, changez de lit
 
Les amoureux du bal perdu
Quelqu'un peut me dire ce qu'ils sont devenus
Les seuls qui n'ont pas cessé de s'aimer
Sont Montaigu et Capulet
À croire qu'il faut vivre enterrer
Pour ne jamais se tromper
 
Publié par Green_Sattva le Dim, 17/09/2017 - 13:32
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traduction en anglais

Cuckolds

I'm writing about doomed lovers,
I'm humming for done for lovers,
I'm singing tales of cuckolders1.
 
I'm dancing for the one-night fling,
for those in the wardrobe, hiding.
Just see how my guitar's blushing.
 
Get away, you mushy weaklings
shying from a truth you can't handle.
I'll give you no happy endings.
If you're alone, drop your candle.
 
Nobody says what came after
for these two lonely ball lovers2
Only Montague and Capulet
never ceased to love each other.
You'd think you'd need to be buried
to never pick the wrong lover.
 
I would ask you to look so far
as a few of your bedroom laughs
before rushing to the altar
arm in arm with your better half.
 
This sure is such intimate stuff,
modesty from the past falters.
Had the postman worked hard enough,
we'd all be brothers and sisters.
 
Sorry if my hand goes postal,
as it writes it gets angry too.
love each other like animals,
go and switch beds, the both of you.
 
Someone tell me what came after
for these two lonely ball lovers.
Only Montague and Capulet
never ceased to love each other.
You'd think you'd need to be buried
to never pick the wrong lover.
 
  • 1. The French goes "I'm singing about cuckolded loves" but, as Gavin said, I'm just going for the rhyme there Regular smile
  • 2. a rather touching wink to this rather touching song of the 60's
Do whatever you want with my translations. I'm not rich enough to sue you anyway.
Publié par petit élève le Sam, 23/09/2017 - 21:55
Modifié pour la dernière fois par petit élève le Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:11
Commentaires de l’auteur(e) :

That's actually quite funny in French. That girl really has a knack with words. Enough to convince me to try an equirhythmic *and* rhyming translation.

Plus de traductions de « Les Cocus »
français → anglais - petit élève
Idioms from "Les Cocus"
Commentaires
Brat    Dim, 24/09/2017 - 11:46
petit élève wrote:

That girl really has a knack with words.

I'd say she is rolling the world at the tip of her tongue. (As I can judge from my level of French).

petit élève    Dim, 24/09/2017 - 12:11

Now you've done it. I'm starting to try equirhythmic and rhyming versions too.
You are really pushing me down a perilious path Regular smile

But yes, she obviously studied her classics.
She manages to put a broad variety of registers to good use, including a few swearwords in strategic spots without even sounding common or vulgar. That makes her metaphors all the more vivid and expressive.
That's a rare talent indeed, the trademark of the very best, like Brassens or Brel.

Brat    Dim, 24/09/2017 - 14:03
petit élève wrote:

Now you've done it. I'm starting to try equirhythmic and rhyming versions too.
You are really pushing me down a perilious path Regular smile

A person who has coped with Yanka's texts shouldn't be so timid. Regular smile Leila's lyrics are much more transparent, though, I'd say, rather whimsical. Right that's needed for a whimsical chatterbox. Teeth smile

petit élève wrote:

But yes, she obviously studied her classics.
She manages to put a broad variety of registers to good use, including a few swearwords in strategic spots without even sounding common or vulgar. That makes her metaphors all the more vivid and expressive.
That's a rare talent indeed, the trademark of the very best, like Brassens or Brel.

She's cute-n-smart, yeah. It's obvious even to non-French with a mediocre level of the language.

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:47

Cuckolders made me hesitate - the ones doing the cuckolding rather than the victims but I see that you're aiming for the rhyme

You've got the dreaded double negative again in "There won't be no happy endings."
Could be allowed - it is said a lot in casual speech but I think she's too smart for that.
There won't be any happy endings / There'll be no happy endings.

One R in buried.
You'd think you'd need to be buried - strictly speaking (agreement)

This sure is "such" intimate stuff - "much" sounds odd

Otherwise - a triumph! :-)

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 10:27
Gavier wrote:

You've got the dreaded double negative again in "There won't be no happy endings."

"We don't need no education" (C) Teeth smile

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 10:54

Actually it's that kind of pop song lines that must have given me this bad habit, like "we don't want no gang boss" from The Clash in "The equalizer".

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:08

I changed this double negative into "I'll give you no happy endings" to preserve the meter. What do you think?

Also I wonder if I should put "Someone tells me what came after..." instead of "someone tell me". Not quite sure about the imperative there.

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:31

Yep that's good. :-)

Yes, someone tell me what came...next - would be better actually. I think fits better too - it nearly rhymes.

Or maybe "Can someone tell me.." c'est comme tu veux. :-)

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:33

Mmm...yes, but putting "next" instead of "after" would ruin the rhyme with "lovers", wouldn't it?

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 12:58

Oh yes - it changes the rhyming scheme doesn't it?
With next though it works as lines 1/3 - 2/4 - sort of.

After is fine though - it's just not as usual. :-)

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:42

Oh well, her French isn't really either, though she manages to make it sound so obvious.

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 12:50
petit élève wrote:

Mmm...yes, but putting "next" instead of "after" would ruin the rhyme with "lovers", wouldn't it?

Maybe it can be
Can someone tell me what ensued
for these two ball lovers' pursuit

?

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 13:21

Well I don't think "pursuit" really matches the idea. In the song she refers to, the lovers are the symbol of innocence blooming again after the horrors of WWII. Her pretending to disregard this symbol of innocence is more like a gentle hint of sarcasm: "I bet even these perfect lovers were not as innocent as you'd think".

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 14:00

Well, I think, "pursuit" taken in its meaning of either amorous activity or any other kind of hobby, for instance, does really make sense. Imagine, what would they do after the accordion stopped playing? Go to bed? Go to altar? Invent another activity to spend their time?
Of course, it's only my humbliest opinion. Wink smile

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 14:01

OK, but that's a rather far-fetched use of "pursuit". The main meaning of the word is pretty different.
If not for the rhyme, I would have picked the simplest possible equivalent of the French, like "what became of...", and even with the rhyme I'd rather stick to the simplest possible translation.
As Gavin pointed out, "coming after for..." is already rather unusual, and I'd rather not change it for something even less usual.

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 14:06
petit élève wrote:

OK, but that's a rather far-fetched use of "pursuit".

Really? I thought in love deals "pursuit" means exactly what I mentioned... Shame on me if it isn't this way... Sad smile

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 14:24

I see what you're getting at and it can be used that way but the sentence "These lovers' pursuit" makes no sense.
"These lovers pursued" (These pursued lovers) as in the sense that they are been pursued
or "This lover's pursuit" - something that lovers do.

But neither of these fit the meaning here. Trust a native on this! Regular smile

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:17

Thanx! BTW, did you mean that "pursuit" can refer only to a single person?

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:23

Not exactly -
*these* lovers' *pursuits
*this* lover's *pursuit*

Although..yes it can be the single pursuit of the two lovers as you've written it. It's not ungrammatical just rather alien sounding to a native.

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:44

Thanx! I'll mark it well. Wink smile

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:18

It's better to say "Some can tell me". Is it close in meaning to the French one?

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 11:29

That's the literal meaning but it's really a request - so the imperative is better.

It's like saying "can someone tell me (please).

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 13:22

Si on avait le même facteur
Is it a pun? I think, it is; I've already found an appropriate Russian adaptation. Don't you disappoint me since that... Regular smile

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 14:56

A pun? I don't think so. It's just a joke about housewives sleeping with the postman or the plumber while their husbands are at work.
The French goes "We would all be brothers and sisters if we shared the same postman" (i.e. he would have slept with all their mothers).

I added the "going postal" pun mostly by accident, while looking for a rhyme, but there is no such thing in the French.

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 14:57

Although - there is a bit of a play is there not?
Facteur = postman but also a maker, a fabricator (of certain specific things maybe)

Sounds good anyway! :-)

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:18

Ah well, that's good thinking, but it doesn't really work.
"facteur" as "maker" is only used in very specific cases, like some musical instruments (un facteur d'orgue).
"maker" in the religious sense would be "créateur". As for "father", that would be "géniteur".

The same "faire" root can be found in a secondary meaning of "facture" (de bonne facture -> well crafted), but that's about it.

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:18

And does it have any connection to "factor"?

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:29

You mean in mathematics? More or less. Since the result of a multiplication is called a "product", I suppose the terms contributing to "create" this "product" were named "factors" as "creators of the product".

The Latin meaning was "author/creator", but it forked to "middle man" a few centuries ago (someone who acts on behalf of someone else), and eventually was used for "postman" as the guy at the end of the post office logistic chain :).

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 16:37

Since that it becomes more and more interesting. If the same factor lay in our equations, they could be reduced to a common denominator.

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 16:15

To get to the bottom of things, I fetched my faithful Robert (arguably the most reliable French dictionary), where "facteur" is defined as:

origin:
14th century, various meanings, "creator/author"
Latin "factor" from "facere" (to make)

1a manufacturer of some musical instruments (piano, flute, organ)
1b someone who handles commercial transactions on behalf of someone else (assistant, agent, officer)
1c postman
2 (mathematics) term involved in a product

Apparently the mathematical term came back to French from English, so you would have to follow that trail with a Merriam-Webster or an Oxford dictionary (neither of which I possess, unfortunately).

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 17:08

Thanx, it was really helpful. It will be also useful to find out whether the list of meanings is arranged in the descending or in the ascending order of their frequency count (a,b,c). "Postman" there is lying third, as well as in my dictionary. Wink smile Google tells that "factor" is the most common translation for both English and Russian, but it's too shitful to be trusted on...

petit élève    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 17:41

Well obviously "facteur" as "manufacturer of a small subset of musical instruments" cannot possibly be the most used meaning, so however they sort their entries, that's probably not by frequency of use Regular smile

The second meaning is extremely technical. I was vaguely aware of it, but I probably never used it in my entire life. I suppose people involved in that kind of business use it every day though.

Google is full of crap. It has the same kind of abyssal bias as Linguee and suchlike, producing semantic definitions out of corpuses that have nothing to do with the living usage of words (Linguee obviously uses a huge amount of corporate and institutional bullshit, for instance).
It makes sense that the mathematical acceptance of "factor" dominates the statistics, since the Internet was first colonized by scientists and other nerds before the used cars and snake oil vendors took over Teeth smile

Gavier    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:18

Thought it might be a bit of a stretch! Regular smile

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:32

The vocabulary suggests too many translations for "facteur", in Russian "фактор" goes first.

Brat    Lun, 25/09/2017 - 15:34

"Postman" is only the third. Teeth smile