Lindworm Massacre

allemand

Lindwurm Massaker

Auf seinem Ross der stählernd‘ Mann
Schnell eilt er die Straße lang
Zu finden Untier auf der Flucht
Zu stillen innig‘ brennend‘ Sucht
Nach Frau und Ruhm herrscht keine Gier
Zu töten ist sein einziges Pläsier
Im Galopp und Stück für Stück
Die Berge stets im kalten Blick
Nach wildem Ritt in luft‘ge Höh‘n
Schwarz wie Basalt vor‘m Bau zu steh‘n
Gar federgleich die Klinge taucht
In tintenschwarzes Blut der Echse Bauch
Nun steht er da und lächelt breit
Umgeben von Glanz und Eingeweiden

Ruhm und Reichtum sind ihm gleich
Nur Jungfrau‘n ab und zu vielleicht
Doch Drachentöter wurd‘ er um
Des Schlachtens willen einzig Grund
Das zu tun was ihm gefällt
Macht ihn weit über‘s Land hinaus zum Held
Steht triumphal im Blute Teich
So wie ein Denkmal seiner gleich

Heinrich der Schlächter wird er genannt
Berühmt und berüchtigt im ganzen Land
Schwarz wie die Nacht strahlt er wie der Mond
Von Heinrich dem Schlächter wird nichts verschont

Tod! Tod! Tod! Tod!
Tod und Grausamkeit und Streit
Seit Kindesalter bester Freund
Als Kind schlug er mit Leidenschaft
Der Nachbarskatz‘ den Schädel ab
Auch der Mutter lieber Hund
Versank mit Sack und Stein im schwarzen Sumpf

Drum hat er nicht lang nachgedacht
Sein Hobby zum Beruf gemacht
Denn wohl keiner ihn bestraft
Dem Bestien er vom Halse schafft
Wenn‘s nur reicht für Brot und Bier
Werden weiter Drachen liquidiert
So lebt er seine Perversion
Für kaum mehr als den Mindestlohn

Heinrich der Schlächter wird er genannt
Berühmt und berüchtigt im ganzen Land
Schwarz wie die Nacht strahlt er wie der Mond
Von Heinrich dem Schlächter wird nichts verschont
Tot!

Voir la vidéo
 Essayer d'aligner
anglais

Lindworm Massacre

On his steed, the man of steel
Fast he is riding along the road
To find (a) beast (that's) on the run
To satisfy (a) craving burning deep inside
He fells no desire1 for woman nor glory
To kill is his only delight2
At a gallop and inch by inch
Always looking coldly at the mountains3
After (a) wild ride into airy heights
To stand black as basalt in front of the lair
The blade is diving like a feather
Into (the) inky4 blood (of) the stomach of the lizard
Now he's standing there smiling broadly
Surrounded by shine5 and entrails

He doesn't care for glory nor wealth
Only perhaps virgins now and then
But a dragonslayer he only became
For the reason of slaughtering
To do the thing that he likes
Has made him a hero in the country and far beyond
(He) triumphantly stands in the pool of blood
Like a monument to himself6

He is called Henry the Butcher
Famous and notorious all over the country
Black as night he is shining like the moon
Nothing will be spared7 by Henry the Butcher

Death! Death! Death! Death!
Death and cruelty and smiting8
(Is his) best friend since childhood
As a child he passionately
Chopped apart the skull of the neighbour's cat
And also the dear dog of the mother
Bogged down with bag and stone9 in the black swamp

So he didn't think about it too long
(And) made his hobby his job10
Because most likely no one will punish him
Who is freed by him from a monster plague11
As long as it's enough for bread and beer
Dragons still will be liquidated
And so he lives his perversion
For not much more than the minimum wage

He is called Henry the Butcher
Famous and notorious all over the country
Black as night he is shining like the moon
Nothing will be spared7 by Henry the Butcher
Dead!

  • 1. literary "There doesn't reign greed"
  • 2. "Pläsier" is a rarely used expression
  • 3. meaning "heading towards the mountains while looking coldly", literary "the mountains always in the cold view/look/sight"
  • 4. literary "inkblack"
  • 5. or "gloss", "splendor", glamour", "glory",...; refers to the idioms "Glanz und Gloria" ("shine and glory") and "Glanz und Glamour" ("shine and glamour")
  • 6. literary "Like a monument same as himself", meaning "Like a monument looking like him"
  • 7. a. b. literary "is spared"
  • 8. or "strife", "fight" or "quarrel"
  • 9. refers to the idiom "mit Sack und Pack" ("with bag and baggage")
  • 10. lit. "into a job"
  • 11. translated very freely
Publié par Sciera le Jeu, 30/08/2012 - 20:51
Modifié pour la dernière fois par Sciera le Sam, 16/11/2013 - 20:52
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Commentaires
    août 30th, 2012

This song is meant to be funny, so maybe a little bit of inaccuracy would allow the English to sound closer to the tone of the original?

steely man -> sounds like "the man with a steely resolve" to me. "man of steel" would sound more like "a strong man"

deeply inside -> "deep inside" ?

for woman and glory -> "nor" ?

Pläsier -> maybe "delight", sounds old fashioned for "pleasure" ("I'm delighted!")

No he's standing -> typo

for glory and wealth -> here again "nor" seems more usual

Like a monument of himself -> "monument to himself" would be more usual and convey the same idea, I think. Or maybe make a longer sentence to match the German, if the style has been complicated on purpose in the original.

Nothing will be spared -> that might be my weak German, but I would have thought this was present tense.

strife -> a hero would rather fight than strife, I think

(Is his) best friend since childhood -> it's not clear what it refers to : the 3 items above are all equal candidates. A plural would have sounded more natural, but the German seems to be singular.

about it to long -> typo

(And) made his hobby to (his) job -> "turned his hobby into a job" ?

Denn wohl keiner ihn bestraft / Dem Bestien er vom Halse schafft -> if I get it right, it's "since surely the one he freed from beasts by taking them by the scruff of the neck (like kittens) will not punish him (for being a psychopathic killer)"
-> since no one will punish you / when you kill beasts instead of pets

Sciera     août 30th, 2012

Quote:
This song is meant to be funny, so maybe a little bit of inaccuracy would allow the English to sound closer to the tone of the original?

I'd gladly make it sound closer to the original. Thanks for giving me suggestions again!

Quote:
Nothing will be spared -> that might be my weak German, but I would have thought this was present tense.

It is present tense, I already mentioned that in a footnote. But I thought future would sound better here, don't you think so?

Quote:
strife -> a hero would rather fight than strife, I think

"fight" is only a veery old fashioned and rarely used meaning of "Streit", it mostly means "quarrel", "argue" etc., and as you see it is not a quite honourable hero. I chose "strife" since it combines the negative aspects of "quarrel" and the "physical fight"-aspects of "fight".

Quote:
(Is his) best friend since childhood -> it's not clear what it refers to : the 3 items above are all equal candidates. A plural would have sounded more natural, but the German seems to be singular.

It's not more clear in the original. But it's clear that it only can refer to the line before. I wrote so many things in brackets because the lyrics are full of incomplete and only halfly connected sentences.

Quote:
Denn wohl keiner ihn bestraft / Dem Bestien er vom Halse schafft -> if I get it right, it's "since surely the one he freed from beasts by taking them by the scruff of the neck (like kittens) will not punish him (for being a psychopathic killer)"
-> since no one will punish you / when you kill beasts instead of pets

"(sich/jemandem) etwas vom Halse schaffen" is an idiom that doesn't have anything to do with cats, it only means "to get rid of something".

    août 31st, 2012

Nothing will be spared -> yes sorry, I did not pay enough attention to the footnote. I thought "nothing is spared by Heinrich..." would sound like "nothing is spared by time", as if Heinrich was a blind force of nature, in an humorous tone.

strife -> "strife" has also the meaning of "struggle", like in every day life or social conflicts. That's why I found it odd for a hero.
However I agree a better term could be found to convey the loutish nature of Heinrich Smile.
Assuming "Streit" is used on purpose in its old-fashioned sense (for the fake epic feel), maybe "smiting"? That's pretty old-fashioned (like in chivalry tales) and conveys an idea of ruthless might.

etwas vom Halse schaffen -> we have a similar "attraper par la peau du cou" idiom in French, that usually does not refer to kittens either (though I suspect that's the origin of the expression, at least in French).
I was more trying to link the sentence with the previous story about doing horrible things to pets, using the idiom as a metaphor. Like if Heinrich was doing the same thing he did as a kid, only with monsters instead of pets. That's a very free translation of course.

Now if you want some suggestions about making the song sound funnier, I could not really break every single suggestion down into individual items. I rather give it a try on an example, and you can pick whatever suits you. Of course that will be farther away from the German, and besides I may not understand it well enough to offer a proper equivalent. And on top of that I cannot guarantee a native would agree with my English. But for lack of a native proofreader, here I go:

On his steed, the man of steel
is riding fast along the road
chasing after a runaway beast
to quell a craving
that is neither for women nor glory.
To kill is his only delight.
At a gallop, he draws ever nearer
the mountains locked in his cold stare.
After a wild ride to dizzy heights
here he stands, black as basalt, in front of the lair
Light as a feather, the blade is quenched
into the black blood gushing from the worm's belly
Now he stands with a wide grin
amid blood and innards.

- craving is always happening deep inside
- "quench" like quenching metal in a forge. It's also a kind of cliché in chivalry tales
- worm or wyrm is frequently used for dragons in chivalry tales, don't know if there is an equivalent in German
- no idea to translate the pun in "Glanz und Eingeweiden", but I think the footnote could do the explanation, leaving the text more fluid.

Btw. a few typos I (or rather Thunderbird's spellchecker) had missed :
cruelty
gallop

Sciera     août 31st, 2012

Quote:
Nothing will be spared -> yes sorry, I did not pay enough attention to the footnote. I thought "nothing is spared by Heinrich..." would sound like "nothing is spared by time", as if Heinrich was a blind force of nature, in an humorous tone.

It could also be understood that way in german but I still think "is spared" sounds a bit strange.

Quote:
strife -> "strife" has also the meaning of "struggle", like in every day life or social conflicts. That's why I found it odd for a hero.
However I agree a better term could be found to convey the loutish nature of Heinrich Smile.
Assuming "Streit" is used on purpose in its old-fashioned sense (for the fake epic feel), maybe "smiting"? That's pretty old-fashioned (like in chivalry tales) and conveys an idea of ruthless might.

I didn't know that expression but I guess it fits better.

Quote:
etwas vom Halse schaffen -> we have a similar "attraper par la peau du cou" idiom in French, that usually does not refer to kittens either (though I suspect that's the origin of the expression, at least in French).
I was more trying to link the sentence with the previous story about doing horrible things to pets, using the idiom as a metaphor. Like if Heinrich was doing the same thing he did as a kid, only with monsters instead of pets. That's a very free translation of course.

I saw that you wanted to find a connection but in german there simply isn't any. And in a translation that is not meant to be are free adaption I don't want to translate it that freely.

Your version of the first verse is really good! Only thing that simply isn't right is in the last line: It doesn't say "blood" in the original but "Glanz", and I really wouldn't like to change that.

As I just said, this version isn't meant to be that free, and I also couldn't write it in English myself that way.
Also, your translation is so much more fluent than the original... as I mentioned above, the original is full of incomplete sentences.

Well, if you want you could add your own version.

Quote:
- craving is always happening deep inside

It is, but the original uses the expression "innig" which also means "deep inside" or "by heart".

Quote:
- worm or wyrm is frequently used for dragons in chivalry tales, don't know if there is an equivalent in German

If you look at the title you will see that we also use a similiar expression: "Lindwurm".
When the context is known, one could propably also say "Wurm".

Another thing: I now changed the "hero's" name to "Henry the Butcher", I guess that sounds better in English.

    août 31st, 2012

Well it would be fun to do another version, but that would just be a rewriting of yours.
As the example of "vom Halse schaffen" shows, my German would not allow me to understand the original well enough.
I can lookup words in a dictionary and make out the most basic grammar, but idioms and general feel of the language are beyond my reach.

Anyway, glad of having being of some help. And I have learned a bit of German in the process too, that's always pleasant.

Henry the Butcher -> yes, that's the idea. Translating the name is like a courtesy to the English reader. I tend to favour general feel over accuracy, but when you can have both it's all for the better.