Slika korisnika Guest

Hi,

Check these guys out!

What are they saying?

Anyone know how to translate a haka?

Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life
Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life

Tenei Te Tangata Puhuruhuru
This is the hairy man

Nana i tiki mai whakawhiti te ra
Who caused the sun to shine again for me

Upane Upane
Up the ladder Up the ladder

Upane Kaupane
Up to the top

Whiti te ra
The sun shines!

Hey! Thanks very much.

May I trouble you to translate these also?

More or less it is the same haka.

Look up haka on wiki or the translation on the All Black's rugby site as they do they same version as well.

I know that the AB and BYU do the same version.

But the words are different in the other hakas.

Guest wrote:
More or less it is the same haka.

Look up haka on wiki or the translation on the All Black's rugby site as they do they same version as well.

I know that the AB and BYU do the same version.

I've listened to the following hakas again. The words are definitely different. Do you know?

The first one does have the same lyrics they have just added to the start & end. Didnt watch the rest

You do realise though that there are more than one type of Haka? Have you ever watch Australia South Africa, PNG, Vanauatu they all have one

Just watched the rest they are ALL versions of the NZ Haka. Lyrics are correct

The Haka "Ka Mate Ka Mate" is a Maori war dance essentially from the Polynesian Maori culture, but no doubt we all have Haka within us all this is just how the Maori people express it. Samoa, Tonga Fiji all have one and when ever they compete in sport they perform these to each other its just the best to see that true Polynesian style!! no one does it better!! its an actual discipline that leads onto Healing practices and then Mamau (hand to hand combat) weaponry ie. Taiaha (fighting staff) Patu (hand wield fighting club and many others.

All these other people performing the haka is a version of the Maori Haka made famous by a Maori chief Te Rauparaha then later by the All Blacks rugby team Aotearoa (New Zealand)s No.1 sport and now it has become a symbol of Identity for all our nation.

This is al the same haka. But some have the call to it while some of the others dont or have a bit of it. the full "call" is
ringa pakia
uma tiraha
turi whatia
hope whai ake
wae wae takahia kia kino
Its all the kamate haka. look up on wiki pedia under all blacks.

Does anyone have a word-for-word translation of each of the four hakas or not?

these haka's came from east coast of new zealand and ther are as meany haka's as there are tribs in new zealand

aaron stott wrote:
these haka's came from east coast of new zealand and ther are as meany haka's as there are tribs in new zealand

I'm wondering if anyone might provide a word-for-word translation of the four hakas listed earlier.

which hakas were you reffering? do you have the words? i can maybe translate them...

"which hakas were you reffering? do you have the words? i can maybe translate them..."

Thank you for your time!

See post #6 where all four hakas are in YouTube format.

If you are unable to view them, I'll try to think of some other way to get them to you.

Pridružio se: 10/06/2011
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In 2006, they had to change the ka mate because one coach found what they did at the end of it "offensive", so now if my memory serves me correctly there 2-3 different versions of it, but I could be wrong on that. Personally, nothing beats the original

Pridružio se: 17/08/2011
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Slap the hands against the thighs!
Puff out the chest.
Bend the knees!
Let the hip follow!
Stomp the feet as hard as you can!
'I die, I die,
'I live, 'I live,
'I die, 'I die
'I live, 'I live,
This is the fierce, powerful man
...Who caused the sun to shine again for me
Up the ladder, Up the ladder
Up to the top
The sun shines!
Rise!

Pridružio se: 18/08/2011
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I have watched three of the four videos (one didnt work) of people doing the haka and have failed to see anyone do the haka right. I wonder if any of the people doing this haka are Maori. I also wonder if any of these people have learnt the meaning of this haka. There is a deeper meaning then just the translation. I wonder if people even know that 'Ka mate' comes from the ancient Moteatea (chant type song) 'Kikiki kakaka'. I also wonder if these people have got permission to do this haka from Ngati Toa (the tribe Te Rauparaha comes from) as they own the rights to this haka. I know the All Blacks have permission along with New Zealand sports teams providing they seek permission also.
Awesome to see 'Ka mate' being loved so much but as I have been told, You must respect all haka and the composers of these such haka and to me respect is knowing.

Question...........
Why do other cultures not practice the culture of the indeginous people to their land??? Australia Bribane missionaries could do a native aboriginee war dance to show respect to the indiginous people of Australia. Maybe the American Football teams (Im guessing are from America) could do a native american indian war dance to show respect to them.

Pridružio se: 14/09/2011
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The haka is from new zealand and the all blacks use it but it originates for my home land new zealand.

Pridružio se: 14/09/2011
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I totally agree aotearoa, I dislike it when I see our haka performed by other country's sports team purely for entertainment (American football) it takes the meaning of the haka away and taints it with a cheep knock off feel.

Pridružio se: 10/11/2011
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Can any one please help me to translate the HAKA in Afrikaans and in English

Pridružio se: 24/01/2012
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Guest wrote:
Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life
Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life

Tenei Te Tangata Puhuruhuru
This is the hairy man

Nana i tiki mai whakawhiti te ra
Who caused the sun to shine again for me

Upane Upane
Up the ladder Up the ladder

Upane Kaupane
Up to the top

Whiti te ra
The sun shines!

Pridružio se: 24/01/2012
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raylene howe wrote:
Guest wrote:
Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life
Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life

Tenei Te Tangata Puhuruhuru
This is the hairy man

Nana i tiki mai whakawhiti te ra
Who caused the sun to shine again for me

Upane Upane
Up the ladder Up the ladder

Upane Kaupane
Up to the top

Whiti te ra
The sun shines!


Pridružio se: 24/01/2012
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this is beautiful anna..

Pridružio se: 21/03/2012
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i'm gratefull that i have discovered the haka (onely just now).it touches me.like all spiritual warrior traditions.I like your sugestion of wanting the usa and australia showing respect to the indiginous people.i'm afraid though that showing respect is not enough,doing a dance. it's nice don't get me wrong,but i say it's time they 'have' respect.until that happens there is no need for a dance. there is individuals ofcourse,but as a whole..... missionairies shouldn't do a wardance if there is no understanding of the unity of life.all is one. i say be proud

Pridružio se: 06/05/2012
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Kia rite
Kia rite
Kia mau
Hi
Ringa Ringa Pakia
Wae wae Takahia
e kino nei ho ki

Pridružio se: 13/06/2012
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I must agree, these haka are performed with alot of mana. Who did the translation????? You make it sound soul less, tenei te tangata puhuruhuru, is refering to someones ancestor, and not just a hairy man. Hes climbing to his understanding, not up a ladder, the sun is the understanding that he finds. Hes watching the land he grew up in clean itself from the war that his iwi has fought.
Its a challenge rather then a sad haka, for his people to rise again. Take a reo class people. You take a lot of the meaning away from these beautiful haka when you ask for "Translations". Why would the All Blacks get up in front of millions and haka about hairy men????

Its sad to see our national treasure translated so wrongly.

Pridružio se: 28/06/2012
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im part tonganbut dont undrstand the language. wierd

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Slika korisnika me4kata
Pridružio se: 28/11/2012
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can you post lyrics on this one? translation is not quite needed, but if you want to, please, go ahead Smile

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Slika korisnika MOHula
Pridružio se: 21/09/2013
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jst22ing - I agree with your comments....allthough, the translations are word for word, the meaning was left out....when I was taught this haka, it was explained somewhat like this:

When one of tûpuna (elder) status [or one of great understanding of life, that has been there to look after the whânau] passes in this life form (Ka mate), another is expected to take on that responsibility (ka ora). The hairy man [generally speaking of a tûpuna status, "grandpa"] (Tenei te tangata puhuruhuru, nânâ i tiki mai whakawhiti te râ) that has always shown the light for the whânau (children, family). Arise, Arise! (Ûpane, ûpane), Arise to the highest potential [speaking of "us - as a people] (Ûpane kaupane whiti te râ!)....

It is sad to see this particular haka done in so many cases as one to "threaten" the opponant....when it is not really a threatening haka. This haka is one of deep poignant thought. "Who will lead us now?" should be your thoughts as you do this particular haka. I'm a Tongan/Hawaiian, but a respector of all of my Polynesian cultures....and I try to learn the proper, or correct traditions before performing a cultural dance....I'm now a kumu hula, and as such, ensure my haumâna (students) the proper mana'o (knowledge) for each dance learned - and the maori haka is one of them (specifically Ka Mate)....and another I've taught is "Tika Tonu," another with a powerful meaning....
I hope what I've posted would inspire those that read and have learned this haka to perform this haka with the proper respect that it deserves....yes, pûkana, and scream, rant and rave....but those that hear your ranting and raving, should hear the "strain" in your voice, and in your heart pleading for one you respect and honor....(a totally different voice setting from "I will eat you alive" screaming)....

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Slika korisnika SilentRebel83
Pridružio se: 22/04/2011
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Wow! I can't believe I hadn't noticed this thread before...

MOHula wrote:
jst22ing - I agree with your comments....allthough, the translations are word for word, the meaning was left out....when I was taught this haka, it was explained somewhat like this:

When one of tûpuna (elder) status [or one of great understanding of life, that has been there to look after the whânau] passes in this life form (Ka mate), another is expected to take on that responsibility (ka ora). The hairy man [generally speaking of a tûpuna status, "grandpa"] (Tenei te tangata puhuruhuru, nânâ i tiki mai whakawhiti te râ) that has always shown the light for the whânau (children, family). Arise, Arise! (Ûpane, ûpane), Arise to the highest potential [speaking of "us - as a people] (Ûpane kaupane whiti te râ!)....

It is sad to see this particular haka done in so many cases as one to "threaten" the opponant....when it is not really a threatening haka. This haka is one of deep poignant thought. "Who will lead us now?" should be your thoughts as you do this particular haka. I'm a Tongan/Hawaiian, but a respector of all of my Polynesian cultures....and I try to learn the proper, or correct traditions before performing a cultural dance....I'm now a kumu hula, and as such, ensure my haumâna (students) the proper mana'o (knowledge) for each dance learned - and the maori haka is one of them (specifically Ka Mate)....and another I've taught is "Tika Tonu," another with a powerful meaning....
I hope what I've posted would inspire those that read and have learned this haka to perform this haka with the proper respect that it deserves....yes, pûkana, and scream, rant and rave....but those that hear your ranting and raving, should hear the "strain" in your voice, and in your heart pleading for one you respect and honor....(a totally different voice setting from "I will eat you alive" screaming)....

Thank you for providing this translation. It's very nice!
The problem about translating Pacific languages is that a single word can have several meanings depending on the context. But you certainly did an excellent job!

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Slika korisnika NateC
Pridružio se: 18/05/2014
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MOHula, this is great insight into the true meaning of the haka. I'd suggest anyone interested in the haka watch this video of a New Zealand army battalion doing a haka for three fallen comrades who were killed in Afghanistan. It's the most powerful performance of a haka I've seen (although I'm no expert). I'm a US veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan and unfortunately have been to a few memorials - this haka is the most powerful, most fitting tribute to fallen comrades that I can imagine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xI6TRTBZUMM