Editor
Slika korisnika Calusarul
Pridružio se: 21/01/2010
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije44 minute 56 sek

Hey, guys, is the weather very hot now there where you live? It certainly is in Romania at this point.
Here are four songs meant to bring on the rain. A Romanian song, a Hungarian one, a Serbian one and a Native American melody.
Can you show me songs from your countries meant to bring the rain?
Let's see which is the most effective in bringing the rain and the most refreshing one!

  1. Paparuda (Romanian)
  2. Add már, Uram, az esőt! (Hungarian)
  3. Prizivanje kise (Serbian)
  4. Calling Rain Native American flute music
Moderator
Slika korisnika MayGoLoco
Pridružio se: 19/05/2008
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije2 tjedna 4 dana

You're songs have certainly helped here in the Netherlands... it's pouring rain like crazy Sad
Maybe we could swap? I'll give you some rain if you give me some warm weather! Laughing out loud

Editor
Slika korisnika Calusarul
Pridružio se: 21/01/2010
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije44 minute 56 sek

Yeah, it worked here too... partly. The temperature dropped from 38 (on Friday) to 26 (today, Sunday). It hasn't rained yet where I live, but it rained in other parts of the country.
Anyway, do Dutch people have such songs there? Or do they use Balkan-Carphatian-Pannonian ones?

Moderator
Slika korisnika MayGoLoco
Pridružio se: 19/05/2008
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije2 tjedna 4 dana

I'm not sure, I only know children's songs about the rain in Dutch...

Moderator of the Kalailani
Slika korisnika SilentRebel83
Pridružio se: 22/04/2011
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije2 sata 38 minuta

Greetings! This one isn't from America, but it's a song that reminded me of this topic:

Rain Dance by Adiemus

Editor
Slika korisnika Calusarul
Pridružio se: 21/01/2010
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije44 minute 56 sek

Well, does this song work? I thought it never rains (rained) in Africa Tongue
Anyone got the lyrics? We might find someone to translate them and see why this song rarely works. Smile

Senior Member
Slika korisnika jesse
Pridružio se: 07/10/2011
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije6 tjedana 2 dana

In the Netherlands we have a band called Kane and they have a song called Rain Down On Me. Maybe it helps?

Editor
Slika korisnika Calusarul
Pridružio se: 21/01/2010
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije44 minute 57 sek

Yeah, heat wave has returned, so we need more cooperation, guys! Bring on those rainy songs!




And I've found more:


Moderator
Slika korisnika MayGoLoco
Pridružio se: 19/05/2008
Korisnik je odjavljan. Zadnji put viđen prije2 tjedna 4 dana

jesse wrote:
In the Netherlands we have a band called Kane and they have a song called Rain Down On Me. Maybe it helps?

I totally forgot about that one Laughing out loud

Super Member
Slika korisnika Hampsicora
Pridružio se: 02/08/2014
Korisnik je prijavljen

I don’t know if I can help you, but I’d like to submit a strange custom that until the middle of the twentieth century has been kept in a few Sardinian villages.
During periods of drought, the peasants of these villages marched wearing masks, carrying a wreath of periwinkle and singing this song:
Maimone, Maimone,
abba cheret su laore,
abba cheret su siccau,
Maimone laudau.
(Maimone, Maimone, the cultivated field requires water, the dry field requires water, Maimone praised)
And as they passed, the devoted people replied: Isperamus chi Deus bos intendat! (we hope may God hear you!)
It’s doubtful who was this Maimone. For some it can be the pagan god Dionysus Mainomenos. For others the Arab daemon Maimun.
More likely it’s to be identified with the "Mammon" who is spoken in the Gospel. Mattew 6,24: “You cannot serve God and Mammon” (another name of Ammon).
In this case it is clearly a residue of the Phoenician religion that survived for a long time in Sardinia and coexisted with Christianity, due to the proximity to Carthage.
Surely he was a rain divinity, since still today “maim” means water in Hebrew.
Elderly people still remember this song and it must have been more widespread in ancient times since, in spite of the prohibitions of the Catholic Church, it has been kept until the last century.
Of course, after they built the water works, dams, artificial lakes, aqueducts, this custom were given up.
Recently some people tried to revive the ancient rite:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ito6IyW-hsY