Nanowar of Steel - Master of Pizza (traduzione in Inglese)

traduzione in Inglese

Master of Pizza

My sun!
 
Born in Naples
Live in misery
Thanks for living to camorra!
 
I live in a volcano
I am Neapolitan
It's a life without a reason
 
You're in Serie B
You're the Napoli
You're failing too
Go to Serie C
 
You don't pay the taxes!
You must pay the taxes
If you don't like the pizza!
I will kill you!
 
Master
Let's go
Master of pizza, let's go, fellows
With tomatoes and a baba
Master of pizza, let's go, fellows
Come back to Sorrento, mama's boy
Master
Let's go
Come back to Sorrento, mama's boy
 
Master
Let's go
 
My sun, it's upon your face
Sun, my sun
 
Let's go
Let's go
Vesuvius, wash them with the fire
Let's go
Let's go
Let's go marshal
 
Let's go, fellows
 
My sun
Master
Let's go
 
Master of pizza, let's go, fellows
With tomatoes and a baba
Master of pizza, let's go, fellows
Come back to Sorrento, mama's boy
Master
Let's go
Come back to Sorrento, mama's boy
Master
Let's go
 
But another sun, that's brighter still
My sun, it's upon your face
 
The sun, my own sun,
It's upon your face!
It's upon your face!
 
Postato da Kiocciolina Sab, 04/02/2012 - 20:56
Aggiunto su richiesta di Sciera
Commenti dell’autore:

There are many references to neapolitan folk songs.
- Oh Sole Mio. The last verse of this song is a part of the classic song. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%27O_Sole_Mio
- Funiculì, Funiculà. The term Iamme owns to neapolitan language, but it's famous to the whole world thanks to this song. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funniculi_funnicula
- Torna a Surriento. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torna_a_Surriento

There are also a lot of common phrases in neapolitan culture, such as Iamme marescià, or bell'e mammà.

In the 4th line, Camorra is a powerful Mafia-type criminal organization originating in the region of Campania and its capital, Naples.

In the 9th line, Napoli refers to the Football club, which at the time of this song played in Italian Serie B - now it's in Serie A.

---
For further explanations, I'm at your disposal

Inglese

Master of Pizza

Altre traduzioni di “Master of Pizza”
Nanowar of Steel: 3 più popolari
Idioms from "Master of Pizza"
See also
Commenti fatti
Sciera    Sab, 04/02/2012 - 23:01

Thanks for translating it so fast Regular smile

But there are some parts where I think you might have made mistakes.
(I don't speak Italian or Neapoletan, I'm just using common sense and google translator)

"Andate in serie C" Your translation here doesn't fit at all.

What is a "baba"?

"’O sole mio sta 'nfronte a te!
'O sole, 'o sole..."
"Ma n'atu sole chiù bello, oi ne'.
’O sole mio sta 'nfronte a te!
'O sole, 'o sole mio sta 'nfronte a te,
sta 'nfronte a te!"
I looked at the translation of this song on the german wikipedia and it's pretty different to the one on the english wikipedia.
It's
"Oh, meine Sonne, strahlt von Dir!
Die Sonne, meine Sonne,"
"Es gibt keine Sonne, die schöner ist (als Du).
Oh, meine Sonne, strahlt von Dir!
Die Sonne, meine Sonne, strahlt von Dir,
strahlt von Dir!"
Which means in english:
"Oh, my sun, is shining from You!
The sun, my sun,"
"There is no sun that's more beautiful (than You).
Oh, my sun, is shining from You!
The sun, my sun, is shining from You,
Shining from You!"
Is that translation on german wikipedia wrong?

Kiocciolina    Dom, 05/02/2012 - 00:29

Baba is is a small yeast cake saturated in liquor, usually rum, and sometimes filled with whipped cream or pastry cream. It's an italian speciality.

'Sta nfronte a me' in Italian means 'è su di te', o 'risplende su di te'. In English this is 'it shines upon you' - in the sense that the sun shines on your face - not 'from you'.

For 'andate in serie C', you're totally right. I've pasted another sentence on the right one. I've fixed that.

Sciera    Mar, 14/02/2012 - 20:45

I forgot to ask something: Does "bell'e mammà" really mean "mamma's boy" as in "someone who still lives at home and is taken care of by his mum"?

Kiocciolina    Mer, 15/02/2012 - 07:34

Yes, it means mamma's boy, but it doesn't necessarily imply someone who still lives at home. It's an expression entered in the collective imagination which denotes the close relation between moms and children in southern Italy, and Naples in this particular case - since it's a neapolitan expression. If you would be a Neapolitan, your mom probably would call you this way as a term of endearment

Sciera    Mer, 15/02/2012 - 10:13

And again thanks for explaining.
Didn't know about that.

I looked up "mamma's boy" in English to German dictionaries and they said it means "Muttersöhnchen" (~"little son of a mother"). That is an insult here in Germany, if you say that to someone you say that he is a coward who runs to his mum when he gets into trouble.
But well, other countries other mentalities.

Kiocciolina    Mer, 15/02/2012 - 11:17

I got it. I guess Muttersöhnchen could be the equivalent of Italia 'mammone' ^ ^