Jail

Portugheză

Prisão

Mas eles dizem que é pior falar
E vão falando para ninguém ouvir
No fim tu sabes onde me encontrar
Traz coisas para destruir

Quantas linhas mais vou ter de ler
Das que escreves para me dizer
Quanto medo tens de abrir mão do medo e mergulhar no caos

Mas eram culpas e as suas más desculpas
E a quem batemos à porta nesse dia
Minha vontade meu amor que bem sabia
Diz-me que sonhos tens diz-me o que vês

Sou uma prisão de que fujo a que regresso

Não vês como é bom dizer eu tentei
Quem sabe eu parti quem sabe eu voltei

Mas eles dizem que é pior falar
E vão falando para ninguém ouvir
No fim tu sabes onde me encontrar
Traz coisas para destruir

Sim o que for tem de ser
Sim foi o que eu quis dizer
Pudesse eu querer mais
O que for tem de ser

Não faças deixa que aconteça
Agarra no momento para que não desapareça

Detesto fazê-lo mas eu não resisto
Nesse momento eu começo a sentir o alívio do ver

Sou uma prisão de que fujo a que regresso

See video
Try to align
Engleză

Jail

But, they say it is bad to speak
And they start to speak, so no one listens to it
In the end, you know where you can find me
Bring along some stuff to tear down

How many of the lines that you write
will I still have to read, so it can tell me
How much you are afraid of giving up on fear and diving into the chaos

But they were faults, and the bad excuses
And who knocked the door in that day
My will, my love knew very well
Tell me what are your dreams, tell me what do you see

I am a jail itself from which I run away, and to where I return back

Don't you see how much good is saying "I tried to"
Who knows I left, who knows I came back

But, they say it is bad to speak
And they start to speak, so no one listens to it
In the end, you know where you can find me
Bring along some stuff to tear down

Yes, everything that was meant to be it will be
Yes, it was what I meant
I wish I could want more
Everything that was meant to be it will be

Don't do, let it happen
Seize the chance so that it doesn't disappear

I hate to do it, but I can't help it
In this moment, I start feeling the relief in seeing it

I am a jail itself from which I run away, and to where I return back

Postat de dowlenon1 la Duminică, 05/08/2012 - 22:32
1 (de) mulțumiri
Utilizator Înainte cu
Lemoncholic2 ani 3 săptămâni
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Clasificarea ta: Nimic
Comentarii
Lemoncholic     August 7th, 2012

So, I guess we can congratulate each other: we have finally finished the album! Smile This is definitely my favourite song from "Pluto". I have some questions, though.

>But, they say it is bad to say
I'm not really sure, but I used to think that translating "falar" as "speak" or "talk" is more accurate.

>How much you afraid of giving up on fear and dive into the chaos
Just small mistakes here. "How much you are afraid of giving up on fear and diving into the chaos".
Am I right?
And here:
>tell me what you see
"Tell me what do you see".

>I am a jail itself where I run away from, and where I return back to
I think, it sounds better this way: "I am a jail itself from which I run away and to where I return/come back".

>Yes, what was meant to be will be
I'm not getting this line quite well. Maybe, "Yes, that was meant to be" is enough?

dowlenon1     August 7th, 2012

Hi Smile

I am very happy I managed to help you with those translations, too bad it is over now! Hope to see more requests soon! Laughing out loud

Thank you for your nice and careful suggestions, I really took into account all of them and have already corrected the translation. I just want to comment about the last suggestion.

Well, I saw you had difficulties to understand what I meant, so I reworded it: "Everything that was meant to be it will be", I hope it is better to be understood?

If you got any other question, please tell me. Thanks Smile

Lemoncholic     August 8th, 2012

Hello again.

So, would you like to see more requests? Then I have good news for you. The founder of the band Manel Cruz (who is the singer and the songwriter for all this stuff) has had three more projects besides "Pluto". He is currently performing with the group "Supernada". I have already found the lyrics and shall post them a bit later. A really big work is waiting for both of us. Wink

Yes, it's better this way. I think, just a comma is all that needed: "Everything that was meant to be, it will be".

When I'm free, I'll re-check all the translations once for, just in case we've missed something. And also, the day before yesterday I bought some textbooks, now I'm preparing to start my Portuguese lessons. Big smile

dowlenon1     August 8th, 2012

Great!

I am looking forward! New challenges are always good. Smile And I am so happy you will start to learn Portuguese Laughing out loud :D If you need my help just PM me and I will help you out as much as I can. Smile

Portuguese is a language a little bit difficult, because it involves genders of words and you need to be much careful on this. Besides, we have several pronouns forms, and you might have difficulties on it as well.

But as I said, if my help is needed, just tell me. Smile

Lemoncholic     August 8th, 2012

Thank you so much for your help.

Genders do not bother me that seriously. My mother tongue has three genders, six cases and an almost unrestricted word order. And no articles at all. Besides, I'm also studying German, meeting all the three genders again. But if in Russian you can guess the gender by word's ending (with some exceptions, mostly of a foreign origin), in German you have no other way but to learn the word's gender to decline its article correctly (still, there are some endings which can help). Cultivating an accurate Portuguese accent seems more tough to me, though, I'm sure that any European will insist on the opinion that Russian phonetics is way more difficult. My textbooks covers the European variant of Portuguese language, but, as I'm informed, two lusophones, one from Portugal and the other from Brazil, have no big struggle in understanding each other.

I'll ask you, if something is hard to understand.

dowlenon1     August 8th, 2012

Oh, that's so cool that your language have genders too! I had forgotten your mother tongue is not English, because generally English speakers have difficulties in learning the genders, since that "the" involves both 'male' and 'female' words, for example:

THE house - THE car

But in Portuguese, it is not like that, we have to use the correct article in order to match the words:

A casa - O carro

So.... you meant your mother tongue has this same type of "rule", so to speak?

dowlenon1     August 8th, 2012

And yesthe differences between European Portuguese (Portugual) and Brazilian are slightly different. Although each with its own, you should listen to and learn the Portuguese you most like and the one that you will, who knows in the future, use it.

Lemoncholic     August 9th, 2012

Yes, my first language is Russian. As for English, I began to study it with a tutor when I was around seven or eight years old. At school the English lessons start since the second grade (or, in some places, since the fifth grade).

Russian has not developed any articles during its history, but you have to know the word's gender to decline it properly. When a word is declined, it changes its ending depending of the case. Let's take all the three genders: masculine ("a house", дом), feminine ("a car", машина) and neuter ("a heart", сердце)
Nominative: дом - машина - сердце
Genitive: дома - машины - сердца
Dative: дому - машине - сердцу
Accusative: дом - машину - сердце
Instrumental: домом - машиной - сердцем
Prepositional: доме - машине - сердце

As you can see, the endings change with each case.

RataNegra     August 9th, 2012

Oh, I wanted to study Russian while studying French, English and any other language that came in my way, but I guess it's difficult for a "hobby" language. Sad
But well, maybe I'll just study it bit by bit until I get it all.

Lemoncholic     August 9th, 2012

RataNegra wrote:
Oh, I wanted to study Russian while studying French, English and any other language that came in my way, but I guess it's difficult for a "hobby" language. Sad
But well, maybe I'll just study it bit by bit until I get it all.

Yes, for a non-Slavic person Russian may turn into a struggle. Its learning will demand a lot of time and energy, but I cannot say it is an impossible task. If you're really interested and dedicated, you'll succeed.

Lemoncholic     August 9th, 2012

Now the word order. For example, in German you always have to put the predicate on the second place:
"Ich baue ein Haus" - "I build a house" or
"Ein Haus baue ich" - "A house build I"

Russian is pretty carefree here. Let's take such a sentence:
"Вчера моя мама уехала во Францию" - "Yesterday my mother went to France".
But, you can also: say "Моя мама вчера во Францию уехала" - "My mother yesterday to France went."
You can make a few more combinations and all of them will be translated just the same. Of course, there are wrong ways in which you should not construct the phrase, but the native speakers and foreign people who speak Russian well, form the correct word order almost by intuition. You sort of "feel" how your phrase sounds the best.

dowlenon1     August 9th, 2012

I see Lemoncholic,

I think Russian is a little complicated because we don't use normal "letters" to write the sentences, but this type of... symbol? alphabet? instead. So... since that I am so used to normal letters, such as English and Portuguese use them, I think if I were try to learn Russian, I would be in some troubles, hahaha.

But, I think it is interesting the fact that you guys do not use articles at all, it makes things easier, at least.

Lemoncholic     August 9th, 2012

People tend to be a little bit scared of the Cyrillic alphabet. Partly, they are right, but not because of a larger amount of letters. Not only we have those freaky symbols, but the pronunciation itself is very difficult. Most of the words are pronounced not the way they are spelled. Our orthography is pure hell. Big smile

We have no dialects either. At all. The pronunciation of vowels varies a bit from the southern parts of the country to the northern, and citizens of Moscow swallow some sounds, but all in all it's not what people are used to call a dialect.