Deutschland (إلى الإنكليزية ترجم)

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Germany

النسخ: #1#2#3#4
You (you have, you have, you have, you have)
Cried a lot (cried, cried, cried, cried)
Separated in mind (separated, separated, separated, separated)
United in heart (united, united, united, united)
We (we are, we are, we are, we are, we are)
Have been together for a very long time (you’re all1, you’re all, you’re all, you’re all)
Your breath cold (so cold, so cold, so cold, so cold)
The heart in flames (so hot, so hot, so hot, so hot)
You (you can, you can, you can, you can)
I (I know, I know, I know, I know)
We (we are, we are, we are, we are, we are)
You all (you all remain, you all remain, you all remain, you all remain)
 
Germany - my heart in flames
I want to love you and to condemn you
Germany - your breath cold
So young and yet so old
Germany!
 
I (you have, you have, you have, you have)
I never want to leave you (you cry, you cry, you cry, you cry)
One can love you (you love, you love, you love, you love)
And want to hate you (you hate, you hate, you hate, you hate)
Arrogant, superior
Take over, hand over
Surprise, assault
Germany, Germany over everybody2
 
Germany - my heart in flames
I want to love you and to condemn you
Germany - your breath cold
So young and yet so old
Germany - your love
is a curse and a blessing
Germany - my love
I cannot give you
Germany!
Germany!
 
You
I
We
You all
You (overpowering, superfluous)
I (superhuman, sick and tired)
We (whoever rises high falls hard)
You all (Germany, Germany over everybody)
 
Germany - your heart in flames
I want to love you and to condemn you
Germany - my breath cold
So young and yet so old
Germany - your love
is a curse and a blessing
Germany - my love
I cannot give you
Germany!
 
  • 1. Literally “you all are” or "all of you are" but it’s a plural form of you that doesn’t have an English equivalent.
  • 2. This wording is similar to "Deutschland, Deutschland über alles," which is from a now-obsolete verse in Germany’s national anthem.
تم نشره بواسطة Sarah RoseSarah Rose في الخميس, 28/03/2019 - 17:28
تم تعديله آخر مرة بواسطة Sarah RoseSarah Rose في الجمعة, 03/05/2019 - 00:25
الألمانيةالألمانية

Deutschland

Rammstein: Top 3
التعليقات
andy5421andy5421    الجمعة, 29/03/2019 - 11:18

So Neu, So kuhl, so Heiss, super gut ja! Danke!

clouderclouder    السبت, 30/03/2019 - 00:45

> This wording is from Germany’s national anthem.
That's actually wrong, it's part of the original source of the anthem but has been removed after WW2

> Taken over, handed over
> Surprised, attacked
This translation is actually wrong, conceives a wrong meaning. It appears that it's done to Germany, when that's rather kept neutral/Germany as the active part of the action

It should be:
Taking over, handing over
Taking by surprise, ambushing,

malucamaluca    السبت, 30/03/2019 - 03:53

Or:
Take over, hand over
Surprise, assault

Hansi K_LauerHansi K_Lauer    السبت, 30/03/2019 - 12:07
clouder schreef

>"This wording is from Germany’s national anthem."
That's actually wrong, it's part of the original source of the anthem but has been removed after WW2

The wording of the (obsolete) first verse of the German anthem is: "Deutschland über alles"
which is a different grammar from "Deutschland über allen"

Sarah RoseSarah Rose    السبت, 30/03/2019 - 18:02

Can you explain how the different grammar changes the meaning of what is being said? Should this be translated as something different than "Germany above all?"

And is the difference significant enough that you believe they are not referencing the wording in the now-obsolete verse?

EiszeitEiszeit    السبت, 30/03/2019 - 21:56

I believe that what they are saying is that, although the song may reference the obsolete verse, it is NOT considered to be from Germany's (modern) national anthem. That verse is obsolete for a reason. The problem is how you worded the note.

Sarah RoseSarah Rose    السبت, 30/03/2019 - 22:26

I see. I've updated the footnote, let me know if you think that's accurate.

Hansi K_LauerHansi K_Lauer    الأحد, 31/03/2019 - 15:20

@Sarah Rose:
Rammstein has: "Deutschland über allen"
The 1st (now obsolete) verse of the German National Anthem says: "Deutschland über alles".
Obviously Rammstein is referencing to that phrase of the National Anthem, but in a mocking way.
It's a play of words with a seeming quotation.
I would try to translate "Deutschland über allen" -> Germany over everybody, or Germany over all of them
In this grammatical constellation the word "über" is more likely understood as a position determination than in a metaphoric way.
meanwhile "Deutschland über alles" means -> Germany above everything

btw.: please regard the editing of the original in the last stanza. (1st and 3rd line)

Sarah RoseSarah Rose    الأحد, 31/03/2019 - 16:56

Thank you for clarifying, I've updated the translation.

andy5421andy5421    الخميس, 02/05/2019 - 14:47

IHR is the "BIG "you" in the German Language:

Sie - Formal
Du- Informal
Dich
Euch "you all" (small group)
IHR: EVERYONE (big group)

Correct me if I'm wrong and enlighten me

(been learning German since 1999 RAMMSTEIN's "Du Hast")

Danke im voraus

Sarah RoseSarah Rose    الجمعة, 03/05/2019 - 00:24

There’s no distinction between a small crowd or big crowd, but “ihr” is used in the nominative case (when it is the subject of the sentence) and “euch” is used in the accusative and dative cases (when it is the direct or indirect object in the sentence).

To explain this using Rammstein lyrics from Ich Will:

Könnt ihr uns fühlen? --> "ihr” is the subject, so it takes the nominative case.
Wir fühlen euch --> “Wir” is the subject and “ihr” is the direct object, so ihr has to be in the accusative case and becomes “euch.”

domurodomuro    الخميس, 02/05/2019 - 15:00

German language has the declinations, like Latin:
Euch answers to the question "Wen" Akkusativ --- "whom"
Ihr is Nominativ
e.g. "Ihr seid meine Freunde" -- you are my friends, "Ich habe euch als Freunde" --- " I have you as (my) friends"

domurodomuro    الخميس, 02/05/2019 - 15:06

Sarah Rose: you are right with the 1. comment on "you", the english language does not make a difference between sg. and pl. Instead of "you’re all" you could write "y’all are", it's not ambiguous.

Sarah RoseSarah Rose    الجمعة, 03/05/2019 - 00:28

I didn’t want to translate proper German into dialect because it would give the translation a tone that isn’t in the original song. Since that dialect isn’t universal throughout the English language, I thought it was better just to explain why “you are” in German would be said “you’re all” in English.

andy5421andy5421    الجمعة, 03/05/2019 - 07:30

Rule #1: Translating is translating idea to idea when the words don't exactly translate thoroughly ("lost in translation")

Sarah RoseSarah Rose    الجمعة, 03/05/2019 - 19:21

If you think something has been lost in translation here, feel free to let me know.

KrokadelKrokadel    الأحد, 19/05/2019 - 15:44

I would inerpret below as follows

übermächtig, überflüssig = superiority (i.e. supremacy), unnecessary/wasteful
(Übermenschen, überdrüssig) = supreme human being, sickening

I would say that übermächtig and Übermenschen are a state of mind and are here being referred to as wastful and sickening.

Especially in WWII 'Übermensch' was used by Germans to convey their feeling of supremacy over every human that was not 'Arian' or pure bread, i.e. blue eyes and blond hair. This is pretty much the core of white supremacy. It is sickening and wasteful.

Hansi K_LauerHansi K_Lauer    الأثنين, 20/05/2019 - 03:48
Krokadel schreef

Especially in WWII 'Übermensch' was used by Germans ...

"Übermensch" was not a term. "Untermensch" was.

Sarah RoseSarah Rose    الأثنين, 20/05/2019 - 04:21

Regarding superiority and unnecessary/wasteful, those words have the same meaning as the ones chosen in my translation.

Regarding sickening, that would not be an accurate translation for überdrüssig. It's more like "sick of."