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What are the "only in X country" things of your countries?

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<a href="/ar/translator/michealt" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1222532">michealt</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 11.10.2014
Lenka Arya Gurinova wrote:
michealt wrote:

Unique sound "ř" ??? I guess you know no Gàidhlig and no Gaeilge.

No I don't, but I was listening to it and didn't hear any sound that would be similar to ř. However, Polish people have rz, but it's not the same.

Well, there are so may ways of pronouncing Gaeilge (Irish) that you have to be listening to the right person to hear it.
In Gàidhlig (Scottish) most people who speak the North Hebridean dialect or live in the northern parrts of the South Hebridean dialect area pronounce r in the sequence "irde" or "irte" (where the d or t is the boundary between the first and second syllables of the word) or "ird"/"irt" (at the end of a single syllable word) in a way that sounds (to me) like Czech "r" follwed by Czech "ř". But I guess that it may not sound like "r ř" to a Czech.
(I know practically no Czech, and hardly ever hear any, but one of my daughters-in-law was born and brought up Czech so I hear the "ř" from her quite often.)

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<a href="/ar/translator/swedens0ur" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334503">swedensour</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 09.04.2017

Only in Australia Regular smile

Don't watch if you don't like spiders.

This Macca's sign

It's really not hard to find "only in Australia" content. As an immigrant to Australia it's definitely a culture shock. But to be honest, there's a lot of good stuff here that's very unique. The stereotypical weird stuff tends to happen in the outback in the Northern Territory, I haven't really seen much weird stuff in Sydney.

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<a href="/ar/translator/swedens0ur" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334503">swedensour</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 09.04.2017

Only in Australia, things I found interesting as a foreigner:
- The slang: brekkie, arvo, maccas, bottle-o, Brizzie, grog, cbs (pronounced "ceebs), Straya, footy, avo, etc
- drop bears
- vegemite and cheese flavoured crackers
- you don't even see kangaroos that much if you live in the city, but they're so damn cute. Aggressive if you get too close, though
- Sydney has a MASSIVE cockroach problem Sad smile
- universities have bars
- horrible internet
- bilingual signs everywhere in english and persian, english and turkish, english and chinese, english and korean, chinese and vietnamese, english and arabic, english and turkish, etc.
- no one actually says "shrimp on the barbie," Aussies don't even say "shrimp," they say "prawn."
- curb (like the one that you park against), is spelled kerb
- THE ACCENTS
- there's a clause in the australian constitution that includes New Zealand as one of the territories and that if New Zealand ever wants to, they can join Australia at any time.
- there's a town where people live underground because it's so hot.
- sprite and lemon-lime sodas are called lemonade
- There's a hardware store that sells sausages on Saturdays but people started getting upset because the onions would fall off their sausages and other people would slip on them
-Slip-slop-slap
- chicken salt is the best seasoning,
- fights about whether or not fairy bread tastes good.
- the rivalry between Sydney and Melbourne in basically everything
- the emu war, where Australians fought against emus and lost
- Golden Gaytime ice cream bars
- a politician in queensland said some really awful stuff and a teenager egged him and everyone declared the kid as a hero
- you can't even go to the beach sometimes because the jellyfish in this country will kill you
- the huge spider thing is true but so far the only place I've seen one is at the zoo, I don't think they live in the cities
- sometimes they drink alcohol out of their shoe for some reason ???

I know there's a lot here but I hope it helps Regular smile and if anyone has any questions, you can ask. Regular smile

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<a href="/ar/translator/zarina01" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1295512">Zarina01</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 13.06.2016

They eat pork and drink alcohol in Bahrain too!

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<a href="/ar/translator/zarina01" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1295512">Zarina01</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 13.06.2016

You guys have a 3 DAY WEEKEND!!!!???? That's not fair!

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<a href="/ar/translator/zarina01" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1295512">Zarina01</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 13.06.2016

It's like that in England, Bolivia and Brazil too.

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<a href="/ar/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 01.07.2018

I've heard that in Australia, those who do not die of heat and drought perish in floods (or skin cancer, true - or sometimes in collisions with kangaroos). Doesn't look too cool. I think I'll stay home. Confused smile

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<a href="/ar/translator/swedens0ur" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334503">swedensour</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 09.04.2017

It does flood a bit but not too badly in Sydney so I don't know a whole lot about if people actually die from flooding. And as long as you don't piss off the kangaroos they won't hurt you, as with many animals. People sometimes try too much to interact with animals and it's their downfall. Sad smile They also get hit by cars a lot which is harmful to both the animals and the people. The skin cancer thing is very scary. Overall, as someone who moved here with previously no desire to travel here, I very much enjoy Australia in comparison to the USA, and Sydney avoids a lot of the crap that most of the rest of the country has to deal with.

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<a href="/ar/translator/zarina01" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1295512">Zarina01</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 13.06.2016
DarkJoshua wrote:

▪ Italians will never show their national pride. Actually, they would never talk in a good way about the country and they would always make examples of other countries as a good model to follow. However, they turn into the most nationalistic people when there's a good reason to (a football match, important people like Leonardo Da Vinci, etc.).

Josh, it's like that in Spain and Germany too, you show even the tiniest bit of pride in those countries and you're immediately maligned as a fascist, but if it's a football game then all of a sudden it's ok to show patriotism 😑

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<a href="/ar/translator/zarina01" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1295512">Zarina01</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 13.06.2016
DarkJoshua wrote:

▪ Corsica is the sibling they've been separated from and it's the only inhabitable place on Earth outside of Sardinia.

Aww, that's cute! That reminds me of a portuguese girl I met a while ago who told me that people from Portugal call people from Spain "hermanos nuestros" 😊

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<a href="/ar/translator/carnivorouslamb" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1109697">phantasmagoria</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 31.03.2012

Since my last trip to Mexico (a month ago) I've noticed a few more things that I never really thought of:

▪ When you give money to a cashier or are paying for something, they will tell you "I'm receiving x amount, your change is x amount" even at modern places like a 7 eleven. It might be an old habit to break, some of the ladies in the market don't even blink to give you exact change, they do all the math in their heads. It pisses me off that they are often looked down on because they're not educated, yet these ladies do faster math than a high school part-timer here in the US!

▪ Samples, aggressively sometimes. In markets or near restaurants you'll be approached by sellers with samples, some of them will sweet talk you and swear to you that their food is the freshest and if you can't decide, then let a sample speak for itself. Some will even show you where the meat is cut and others will display the skull of an animal to prove that the meat is 100% what they promise. However, some of them do get handsy and will try to grab your arm to get you to try a sample, be ready to be firm and say "no", these kinds will often try to "charge" you for samples even if you don't buy anything.

▪ Parking is not free anywhere, you must pay for parking wherever you go. Even on streets where there are only homes and no businesses you will have a person standing on the street and will charge you to keep an eye on your car. Never park or leave your car unattended in the city, park wherever there's parking meters or in areas where there's bound to be more activity.

▪ In the last twenty years, our currency has changed for security purposes. Don't be surprised when merchants won't take a bill or ask for a newer one. For more info on that, go here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_peso#Banknotes

▪ In 2018 a new series (G) was introduced, so the $500 peso looks like the $20 peso in color and the same person (Benito Juarez), if you're not careful you could end up losing money if the person giving you change is just as careless or is robbing you blind.

▪ I don't know if other countries do it (The US doesn't do it, maybe in coins but not dollar bills, those haven't changed much except for visual updates and for security purposes) but Mexico has commemorative bank notes that are like alternative versions of the regular notes except they're still current and have started circulation with series (F).

▪ To use the Metro system in Mexico, you use a refillable card (like the Oyster card in the UK or a Metrocard in NY) or pay for a ticket to get to a platform. Stations are divided into 12 lines (obviously each with their own stops) and all of them are represented by a color and logos (see example here). So even if you don't know a word of Spanish, all you have to do is remember or know the logo of your stop and you'll never get lost. If a logo is in more than one color, it means you can connect to other lines of the other colors. There's a separate car for women (and children) only at the end of the platform, men are not allowed to board it and is clearly labeled. The same goes for certain light rail buses and taxis that cater only to women.

▪ People are very polite (despite what you hear in the media or from people who have never been here), store owners will treat you like they've known you all their life and some will remember you even if you haven't seen them in a long time. There's a store owner near my house who I see a handful of times when I stay in Mexico, he knows I live in the US and always remembers me when I come over to buy from him (very sweet man). I went to the market that I hadn't been to since last year and the owner recognized us right away! he said "You're the lady from last spring, you were having a party and you bought a good amount from us. Your aunt always buys from us, she's our best customer", and now I feel bad that I don't remember his name.

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<a href="/ar/translator/sydney-lover" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1112972">DarkJoshua</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 10.05.2012

Don't know why I didn't get a notification for this.
Anyway, I realise not everyone in the world is a patriotic (luckily so, I'd add), but in Italy things are little bit different. When they don't show any kind of patriotism (which is most of the time) they would whine about Italy being the worst country, while emphasising the success of other countries. If you show pride in your nation outside of specific contexts, you would be laughed off and not taken seriously. There's not even the stigma of being considered a fascist just for showing a little bit of pride.
I honestly think that's pathetic.

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<a href="/ar/translator/carnivorouslamb" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1109697">phantasmagoria</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 31.03.2012
DarkJoshua wrote:

Don't know why I didn't get a notification for this.
Anyway, I realise not everyone in the world is a patriotic (luckily so, I'd add), but in Italy things are little bit different. When they don't show any kind of patriotism (which is most of the time) they would whine about Italy being the worst country, while emphasising the success of other countries. If you show pride in your nation outside of specific contexts, you would be laughed off and not taken seriously. There's not even the stigma of being considered a fascist just for showing a little bit of pride.
I honestly think that's pathetic.

Bug maybe?

Outside of what specific context (can you give an example).

I've never tried to hide my disdain for the US and everything it stands for (even though I am an American born citizen, my parents are Mexicans and therefore I am 100% Mexican1 and I hate the blind patriotism they display here, especially those whose families served in the military and they use that as an excuse to be racist-purist-propaganda-ignorant-full of shit people who wipe their as**es with the pages of history books and spit at the people who are the living evidence that Caucasians weren't here first nor did they build this country with their own two hands, they did it by the sweat of the backs of natives and people of color.

In Mexico people are patriotic for all the wrong reasons too, but some of them (from my generation at least, some from my parents' generation) understand all of Mexico's wrongdoings and don't try to ignore Mexico's violent history, but a part of them is patriotic because Mexico isn't just a country, it's our parents and our families back home, it's something that beckons us home and that lights something deep in us at the thought of ever being permanently apart from it. I was born and raised in the US but my heart has always longed for Mexico, I am proud of her colors and comfortable reading through her centuries of history (even the bloody and unjust parts) and I sing out her anthem with pride (when the occasion for it is there), I embrace all the good and all the bad from my motherland. To become Mexican is for it to be born in your heart, you don't need to be born on its lands to love the country and people there don't give two sh*ts as long as you are genuine in your love for her.

  • 1. I mean through my parents, I have great grandparents from Spain and can trace my ancestry to the 1700's through my mother's father's mother's side of the family to a little town in the north of Spain.
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<a href="/ar/translator/sydney-lover" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1112972">DarkJoshua</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 10.05.2012
phantasmagoria wrote:

Bug maybe?

Outside of what specific context (can you give an example).

I've actually just realised I had unsubscribed from the thread... I feel stupid now.
I talked about specific contexts in the comment Zarina quoted. You know, football matches, influential people (Leonardo Da Vinci, Dante Alighieri, etc.) and stuff like that.

I honestly don't like when people are patriotic, neither in a negative, nor in a positive way, but I'm aware this is a result of my upbringing and I'm glad I was born in a country where the nationalistic pride is not so flaunted about and always present as it is in other countries.

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<a href="/ar/translator/carnivorouslamb" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1109697">phantasmagoria</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 31.03.2012
DarkJoshua wrote:
phantasmagoria wrote:

Bug maybe?

Outside of what specific context (can you give an example).

I've actually just realised I had unsubscribed from the thread... I feel stupid now.
I talked about specific contexts in the comment Zarina quoted. You know, football matches, influential people (Leonardo Da Vinci, Dante Alighieri, etc.) and stuff like that.

I honestly don't like when people are patriotic, neither in a negative, nor in a positive way, but I'm aware this is a result of my upbringing and I'm glad I was born in a country where the nationalistic pride is not so flaunted about and always present as it is in other countries.

Ah, I see. Yeah, that bothers me too. I just hate blind patriotism and patriotism brought out by a famous figure. It's like when people say "I'm so proud to be an American, just look at x person here" and I'll look at them and say "you do know x person had slaves during that time right?" or when people fight over what nationality their favorite baseball player is from and argue that that's their reason for being patriotic.

Like Cinco de Mayo just passed right? I got into an argument with someone when I asked them "what do you think that date represents? does the Battle of Puebla ring any bells?" and their answer (I sh*t you not) was "It's just a holiday, you act like someone died, it's a party". All my friends, coworkers and family are banned from coming into my home with their ignorant BS, you leave that sh*t at my doorstep and we won't have any problems. I also hate when people shove their patriotism in your face, 4th of July? I honestly don't care, I don't want to be dragged to your BBQ parties for a country's independence day that later on had a civil war that fought over whether it should be allowed to have slaves or not and that is eager to burn my people at a cross and leave infants and children to die in detention centers in our modern day era, I don't want to have to turn the AC and TV on in my house up to MAX because you're all lighting up fireworks all night long (which is illegal in the state of NY) and you won't let me sleep to get to work early and my dog won't stop barking.

Sorry for the vent, people just get on my nerves with this and I often speak my mind.

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<a href="/ar/translator/zarina01" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1295512">Zarina01</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 13.06.2016

Well, this conversation has taken an interesting turn 😅

But in all seriousness, I don't think being patriotic is an inherently bad thing as long as people don't take it too far. Take me for example, I'm very patriotic about my country but at the same time I'm not an obnoxious idiot who constantly shoves that down other people's throats and ignorantly acts like I live in the best country in the world, because that's obviously not true.

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<a href="/ar/translator/michealt" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1222532">michealt</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 11.10.2014

It's strange how nationalist pride varies between nations. I feel that too many nations now have there national pride in how some of their people can win sporting competitions (eg soccer or some other international "sporting" event) by breaking the rules of the sport so cleverly that the referees/umpires/judges don't spot it, or in how some historical characters won something for the nation despite their immoral activities. There are still perhaps some nations whose people often take national pride in things that deserve it, but I suspect there are very few. From what Ellen says, Mexico may be one of those honourable few.

Scotland, sadly, fits into this. That seems to me to be a sad new phemomenon - since when were soccer and rugger the principal sources of Scottish national pride? When I was young we were proud to be the nation of Robert Burns and Adam Smith and James Watt and John Napier and of others such as Andrew Carnegie and Colin Campbell (Lord Clyde). Why weren't the English proud to be the nation of Chaucer and Shakespeare and Newton instead of the nation of Stanley Matthews and Roger Bannister (at least those two didn't win by cheating, English pride was not as misguided way back then as it seems to be now)?

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<a href="/ar/translator/swedens0ur" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334503">swedensour</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 09.04.2017

Being patriotic and flying the flag in Australia outside of Eurovision or rugby contexts can have some racist connotations (but of course, not always). Sometimes people use Australian patriotism as an excuse to be awful to immigrants and aboriginal people. So in more positive contexts, the australian flag can be flown alongside the aboriginal flag. Though as an immigrant here, I have a huge Australian flag that I got before I came here because I like flags. But they're rarely seen flown in front of houses like they are in the US because of the connotations. I don't really see being patriotic as a bad thing, you should be allowed to like the piece of land you come from, but sometimes people take it too far.

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<a href="/ar/translator/sydney-lover" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1112972">DarkJoshua</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 10.05.2012

[@phantasmagoria], [@Zarina01]
I don't want to impose my standpoint on others, but this is one of those topics that I really care about.
I'm happy that Mexico doesn't have such an obnoxious sense of national pride and I agree that national pride shouldn't be taken too far. As a European, the memories of the way populist and nationalistic governments took control during WWII is still alive among those who lived it and passed down to the new generations. No one would ever dare to take their national pride that far, especially in countries like Germany where learning from your country's past has become part of the culture.
My problem with a more positive sense of national pride is a different one. I find it stupid to take pride in things you haven't done, people you have never met outside of a history book and discoveries you didn't make. I remember a friend of mine whining about some people wearing shorts with the Union Jack on them when I was in London. A symbol, such as a flag, shouldn't have such a power on people, it shouldn't dictate your actions. People shouldn't be offended by symbols (as [@swedensour] said about the Australian flag in certain contexts), because then any symbol could be used to harm others, disunite them and put one against the other.
What annoys me the most is that a positive national pride and a negative one are two sides of the same coin. Feeling pride for your country is to limit yourself to your birthland... and people make wars about birthlands. Some are taught to hate their neighbouring nation(s) just because of political conflicts that shouldn't have any effect on civilians.
People also let themselves be dictated by their identity. I struggled a lot in my life figuring out my identity and I came to the conclusion that I am the same, no matter where I was born or raised. Culture is not a determining factor in your personality, if you don't agree with the culture you were taught since you were born... and if you disagree with your culture, it means that your personality is a separate entity. The problem is for those who agree with their culture and let themselves be influenced by it. But I think people are more than their nationalities: letting yourself be determined by the country you were born and/ or raised in is not only a huge mistake, but also extremely limiting. I don't even like saying I'm Italian when I'm abroad, because I'm not Italian: I am myself and nothing else. I'm a person and human being before anything else. That's what I don't like.

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<a href="/ar/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 01.07.2018

Sure, but no person in the world can claim he/she is and thinks without any cultural background, even if somehow mixed. I know my culture is the French culture from France, that means, not from Québec, Antilles or Africa for example, and of course not the English, American or Russian one (a little bit German, though). This doesn't mean that I put French culture over other cultures, on the contrary, they interest me much, but I will never think like an American for example, simply because there are too many things an American has learned nearly from his birth, while I know only a very tiny bit of it. I think it is a big mistake to think that, because no culture should be considered as superior to another one, then all people in the world should be identical and interchangeable. Perhaps they will be, in some decades or centuries, when they will all have mixed together, and think the same things at the same time, speak the same language and sing the same songs, which would be awfully sad, but I very much doubt it : new cultures will emerge, different from the ones we know nowadays, yet separate, not to be mingled, sometimes competing with each other. Or perhaps there will be no more mankind then.

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<a href="/ar/translator/sydney-lover" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1112972">DarkJoshua</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 10.05.2012
Jadis wrote:

I think it is a big mistake to think that, because no culture should be considered as superior to another one, then all people in the world should be identical and interchangeable.

Neved claimed that.
My point is that identity should have priority over culture. It's true that no one is born without any cultural background and thus everyone is influenced by their culture in a way or another, but that doesn't mean that your culture identifies who you are.
People aren't identical and interchangeable. The only thing we all have in common is that we are all different from one another and can't be limited by concepts such as culture or nationality that tie us to specific characteristic and behaviours. That's what I was trying to say.
Also I must highlight the fact that I don't claim my viewpoint to be any better than yours. Much of my mindset is a result of life experiences and therefore might not be applicable or understandable to other people.

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<a href="/ar/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 01.07.2018

I was thinking about the question of immigration, among others. It seems that many people think that there is absolutely no difference between an American, a Polish, an Asiatic or an African immigrant (for example), since they should all be equal (in rights). This is just nonsense, IMO. Of course they are different, of course the fact that they (perhaps) will get French documents will not make out of them in an instant, by some magic trick, the strict equivalent of a guy whose ancestors have been living in France for many generations. But uttering so obvious a thing is considered as nearly a crime by now... It's a kind or a religious belief, disregarding everything one might notice using their own eyes or ears... Dogmatism : not much progress in mentality since Middle Age.

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<a href="/ar/translator/sydney-lover" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1112972">DarkJoshua</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 10.05.2012

Well, I was talking more about one's own perception of themselves, rather than a political status. Politics works in a different way and being granted citizenship of the country you're living in has bigger consequences than not understanding a foreign culture or taking in pride in your new nation...
I understand your point of view and I can say I can agree with it. I also don't like the way some opinions gets completely ignored or even falsely accused of whatever "bad" ideology (such as racism) just to make your point more "right"... as if right and wrong even existed.

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<a href="/ar/translator/carnivorouslamb" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1109697">phantasmagoria</a>
تاريخ الانضمام: 31.03.2012

Before we get back on topic, I'd like to say that your country doesn't define you as a person nor does it define your values. Be proud of your country for all the good things, but always keep in mind all the wrongs it has committed and strive to never repeat it again. If you forget the wrongs, how are you supposed to learn not to do it or why it's wrong in the first place? Don't limit yourself to what you've been brought up to know, countries shouldn't be "enemies" with other countries nor should they hate each other's people, this isn't a soccer match. Love, if not that then respect each other and don't be offended if others don't love your country or respect it, the right things should start with yourself. Maybe that's just my own mentality, or maybe there's a lot of idiots out there who are patriotic for all the wrong reasons. In Mexico we don't celebrate our battles and wars, we honor our dead for losing their lives in their fight for their ideals.

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