Soolking - Guérilla (English translation)

Proofreading requested
English translation

Guerilla warfare

[Stanza 1]
Nothing has changed in our hearts, it's always the crazy life,
Yeah girl goto the shop, I'm a magnificent devil
It will always be us, the guilty, guilty of being African,
Guilty like Kadhafi or like Nelson Mandela
Mama, it's time, we've even suffered too much
No matter, it was written that we should suffer more than the others
but the others and their children they've taken eveything from us,
so me, I'll steal at the homes of the rich like my friend Badji, la la la la
 
[Refrain]
I sing of love in the middle of this guerilla war
because I will always love you, my Algeria,
I sing of love in the middle of this guerilla war
They don't want peace because they don't know guerilla warfare
In our heads it's always guerilla warfare
Guerilla, Guerilla
In our heads it's always guerilla warfare
Guerilla, Guerilla
and I'm not there any more, if you look for me I'm no longer there
if she seeks me I'm no longer there, if she seeks me I'm no longer there,
if you seek me I'm no longer there, if you seek me I'm no longer there,
if she seeks me I'm no longer there, tell then all I'm no longer there
 
[Stanza 2]
I'm coming back from far far away, almost as far as the land of the dead,
I've dreamt that we weren't poor any more and that our sad story is nothing but words
But in truth they have escaped or built barriers
you'll be fine, mama told me, courage, bonny lad
I'm not expecting love my heart is dead baby
I'm waiting for good luck and I hope it won't take long,
I was totally screwed up and you did nothing but look,
don't come and touch me now, carry on looking, whoreson!
 
[Refrain]
I sing of love in the middle of this guerilla war
because I will always love you, my Algeria,
I sing of love in the middle of this guerilla war
They don't want peace because they don't know guerilla warfare
In our heads it's always guerilla warfare
Guerilla, Guerilla
In our heads it's always guerilla warfare
Guerilla, Guerilla
and I'm not there any more, if you look for me I'm no longer there
if she seeks me I'm no longer there, if she seeks me I'm no longer there,
if you seek me I'm no longer there, if you seek me I'm no longer there,
if she seeks me I'm no longer there, tell then all I'm no longer
 
[Envoi]
Yeah Yeah
La la la
ah ah ah
Pour the tea, bonny lass, pour the tea, bonny lass!
Pour the tea, bonny lass, pour the tea, bonny lass!
 
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Submitted by michealt on Fri, 16/03/2018 - 10:38
Added in reply to request by bosanac2256
The author of translation requested proofreading.
It means that he/she will be happy to receive corrections, suggestions etc about the translation.
If you are proficient in both languages of the language pair, you are welcome to leave your comments.
French

Guérilla

Soolking: Top 2
Idioms from "Guérilla"
See also
Comments
petit élève    Fri, 16/03/2018 - 11:29

You did your homework on city block yoofspeak and Arabic Regular smile

Itwill
orlike -> missing spaces

ils nous ont tout pris -> you translated it as "il nous ont tous pris". "tout" means "they took everything from us" (also you can hear the difference, the 's' is audible while the 't' is not)

J'reviens de très très loin -> "revenir de loin" is idiomatic, like "dodge a bullet" or "(escape) a close call". But of course he plays on the litteral sense too.

we weren't poor any more -> wouldn't that be "anymore" ?

I was in the holw -> I guess it's a typo for "in the hole", right?
But as far as I know "in the hole" means "being broke / in debt" while the French rather means "hitting rock bottom" in a more general sense.

viens pas me gratter -> usually "gratter" means "borrow money", but maybe not in yoofspeak Regular smile

fils de pute -> that's extremely common (and crass vulgar), so I'd rather use "motherfucker" as an equivalent Teeth smile

michealt    Sat, 17/03/2018 - 01:39

I agree with most of that, but I think "Sarbi l'atay" isn't Arabic, it's French (Algerian illiterate spelling). I'm not sure whether other bits are Berber or Arabic, but there are only three words all together in thise bits.

"anymore" is just bad speliing - the norm is "any more". I use the bad spelling quite often, but not when I'm being careful or formal.

I think that here "gratter" just means "touch" (or, perhaps, in yoofspeak, "get my paws on"). My "scratch" was an awful mistake.

"fils de pute" - "whoreson" is literally correct, but maybe too oldfashioned. "motherfucker" is nice and modern, but utterly inaccurate and probably too strong. Or maybe I'm many decades out of date because when Brassens sang "Il s’en fallait de peu, mon cher, que cette putain ne fût ta mère" I never imagined that that bit might mean "that you were not a motherfucker". But language does change over half a century and more,

petit élève    Sat, 17/03/2018 - 06:25

Fancy that. I would never have guessed "anymore"' was actually US English.

Insults are idiomatic. I don't think their meaning matters as much as their usage. I think "fils de pute" was at least as shocking and insulting 50 years ago, but Brassens avoided the sheer vulgarity of the expression by rephrasing it.
Anyway, it's not such a big deal. Mr. Soolking being no Brassens, any crass common insult will do for his prose Regular smile

michealt    Sat, 17/03/2018 - 15:25

Actually it's not particularly US English, it probably originated in the USA and spread to the UK a few decades later (maybe 10 years ago).
The OED has 56 citations (50 for use in non-positive statements, 6 for use in positive statements) of "any more" three of which run the words together as "anymore". Two of those three (dated 1970 and 1971) are from American books, the other (dated 2008) is from an "extra section" of a British Newspaper (The Independent).
Maybe leaving the inter-word space out is becoming sufficiently used to be a generally accepted variant way of spelling "any more"; or maybe not. According to Miriam Webster, it can only be used as an adverb of time, so even in the USA the space is compulsory in things like "I don't have any more beans".

Also according to MW "any more" (with or without the space) is quite widely used in positive (as opposed to negative, interrogative, or conditional) statements in the USA. That usage is extremely rare in Britain apart from perhaps Northern Ireland (and extremely rare in parts of the USA too, notably in New England). Of the 6 citations illustrating it in the OED, 3 (one of which omits the space) are from the USA, 1 is from an English novel (Lawrence's "women in Love"), and the other 2 are from dictionaries of the Ulster dialect of English.

petit élève    Sat, 17/03/2018 - 19:19

Yes, I only meant "not anymore' as "no longer". I would never think of writing "we don't have anymore bread".
After all there are many valid concatenatons for adverbs based on "any". Still that's good to know.