Unknown Artist (Irish) - The Soldier's Song (French translation)

English

The Soldier's Song

We'll sing a song, a soldier's song
With cheering, rousing chorus
As round our blazing fires we throng,
The starry heavens o'er us;
Impatient for the coming fight,
And as we wait the mornings light
here in the silence of the night
We'll sing a soldier's song
 
CHORUS:
Soldiers are we,
whose lives are pledged to Ireland
Some have come from a land beyond the wave,
Sworn to be free,
no more our ancient sireland
Shall shelter the despot or the slave;
tonight we man the gap of danger
In Erin's cause.
come woe or weal;
'Mid cannon's roar and rifle's peal
We'll chant a soldier's song.
 
In valley green or towering crag
Our fathers fought before us,
And conquered 'neath the same old flag
That's proudly floating o'er us,
We're children of a fighting race
That never yet has known disgrace,
And as we march the foe to face,
We'll sing a soldier's song
 
CHORUS:
Soldiers are we,
whose lives are pledged to Ireland
Some have come from a land beyond the wave,
Sworn to be free,
no more our ancient sireland
Shall shelter the despot or the slave;
tonight we man the gap of danger
In Erin's cause.
come woe or weal;
'Mid cannon's roar and rifle's peal
We'll chant a soldier's song.
 
Sons of the Gael! Men of the Pale!
The long watched day is breaking;
The serried ranks of Innisfail1
Shall set the tyrant quaking.
Our camp fires now are burning low;
See in the east a silvery glow,
Out yonder waits the saxon foe,
So chant a soldier's song.
 
CHORUS:
Soldiers are we,
whose lives are pledged to Ireland
Some have come from a land beyond the wave,
Sworn to be free,
no more our ancient sireland
Shall shelter the despot or the slave;
tonight we man the gap of danger
In Erin's cause.
come woe or weal;
'Mid cannon's roar and rifle's peal
We'll chant a soldier's song.
 
  • 1. "Innisfail" comes from gaeilge "Innis Fàil" which means "the island of Ireland"
Submitted by michealt on Sat, 29/11/2014 - 15:33
Submitter's comments:

These are the original words, written in 1907 by Peadar Kearney and set to music by Kearney and Patrick Heeny. It became famous when sung by the rebels at the Dublin GPO during the 1916 Easter uprising. Some time between 1917 and 1922 an Irish translation was made by Liam Ó Rinn and printed first in The Freeman's journal in April 1923, with a very slightly different version following in An tÓglach in Novemebr of the same year.
this wsn't the first Irish version of the song; several people had translated it to classical literary Irish, a language which no-one except academics spoke and very few non-academics could read or write; but it was the first translated into the Irish actually spoken in the Gaeltachta (the parts if Ireland in which Irish was the main language), and as a result it this is the Irish version that survived.

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French translation

Hymne national de l'Irlande

Nous sommes des soldats,
Au service de l'Irlande,
Quelques-uns sont venus
D'une terre au-delà de la mer.
Jurés d'être libres,
De notre ancienne Patrie
À l'abri du despote ou de l'esclavage.
Ce soir nous défions le péril, et
Au nom de l'Irlande, et douleur ou blessure,
Et au milieu des canons,
Nous chantons la chanson d'un soldat.
 
Submitted by Gulalys on Tue, 24/09/2013 - 22:07
Unknown Artist (Irish): Top 1
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Comments
SilentRebel83    Fri, 23/03/2018 - 03:55

source lyrics has been revised. Please check your translation at your own leisure. Thank you. Regular smile