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Gena el donia fi lafa (جينا الدنيا في لفه) (English translation)

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English translation

We came into this world in a spin

Days keep passing by
We can barely catch up
Distracted in a world full of distractions
No one lives forever
We always seek more
Nothing lasts forever
We're only human, we forget
 
We came into this world in a spin, and leaving it in a spin
In between we take a spin (x2)
 
Some people seek life, some people seek faith
And some people in between
Life sells you for little
And slams you down when you're on top
Life is hard on the poor
And in the end, everything happens for a reason
 
We came into this world in a spin, and leaving it in a spin
In between we take a spin (x2)
 
Crowded and dark, screaming and fighting
Everyone is running around, living in a race
This one's saving money, this one's running after money
And this one's trying to fix his wrinkled face
Everyone wants to come on top
As if life lasts forever
 
We came into this world in a spin, and leaving it in a spin
In between we take a spin (x2)
 
Submitted by Sarah S. on Wed, 16/08/2017 - 17:24
Added in reply to request by Vanessa_
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Your rating: None Average: 4 (2 votes)
Arabic

Gena el donia fi lafa (جينا الدنيا في لفه)

More translations of "Gena el donia fi ..."
EnglishSarah S.
4
Idioms from "Gena el donia fi ..."
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Comments
Velsket    Wed, 23/05/2018 - 22:02

جينا الدنيا في لفة و ماشيين منها في لفة --> Here لفة means a rag/fragment of cloth, not a spin.
[We've come into this world [wrapped] in a rag, and we'll leave it wrapped in a rag.]

و بين اللفتين بناخد لفة --> Here لفة means a ride/a go. The song has nothing to do with spinning.
[And between the two rags, we go on a ride]

Guest    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 07:43

1/ Her translation is appropriate, as we come to life as quickly as we leave it, like she writes "in a spin" . This is the real meaning.
جينا الدنيا في لفة و ماشيين منها في لفة

2/ و بين اللفتين بناخد لفة: Here it means, between our "birth" and our "death" (between the quick arrival to life and the quick departure, we go on a trip, we live our life...) It's neither about a "spin" nor a "ride/ go".

My two cents

TC

Velsket    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 07:56

Hey there, thanks for passing. Interesting objections, can't agree though:

1) The first لفة is the clothes you wrap a baby in. You can put "لفة البيبي" in google image search to see what I'm talking about. I think you might be reading this as though it's modern standard Arabic when it's Egyptian Arabic; it would create understandable confusion.

The second لفة is the clothes Muslims wrap a deceased person in before they are lowered into their grave. To see it you can google ''لفة الكفن'' or simply ''كفن". So it's obvious to an Egyptian here spinning isn't relevant.

2) Again this is a strictly Egyptian expression... When you go to the carnival and you want to take a ride on the roller-coaster we say "هاخد الرولر كوستر لفة". If someone tells you "Hey did you like the car?" .. You can respond "و الله خدتها لفة معجبتنيش". So in both scenarios it has to do with having a go at something/taking a ride. Now imagine life is the car, that's what the singer means. In short, we are born in a sheet of clothes, leave the world in a sheet of clothes, and between the two sheets, we take life for a brief ride.

Such songs are difficult for non-native speakers of the Egyptian dialect. And this is a rare instance where one is almost required anyways, so, it's a decent attempt by the translation author but misses the main analogy ( لفة بيبي --> ناخد الدنيا لفة --> لفة الكفن)

Cheers,
Vel

Eagles Hunter    Fri, 25/05/2018 - 00:25
FranceA a écrit :

Her translation is appropriate, as we come to life as quickly as we leave it, like she writes "in a spin" . This is the real meaning.
جينا الدنيا في لفة و ماشيين منها في لفة

Really! Did you meant to write that?? Sir, You have COMPLETELY MISSED THE POINT.
جينا الدنيا في لفة و ماشيين منها في لفة
is an Egyptian saying that refers that we receive the life wrapped (in baby wrap), leave it in a wrap (one of the procedures that is done before burying the dead body).
وبين اللفتين بناخد في الحياة (لفة)
The last
لفة
should be translated as a RIDE or a SHORT RIDE. These 2 lines together mean that we all come from a humble beginning and end to uncelebrated end and all what we spend between the beginning is a short time we spend moving. These 2 lines are based on the famous Egyptian saying:
جينا الدنيا في لفة و ماشيين منها في لفة
as well as the pun الجناس made by using the word
لفة
in 3 different meanings.

Guest    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 10:08

1/ I know it's Egyptian. This "لفة " is mainly used in Egypt. As for "".
لفة عين

It's definitely not about the cloth you wrap the baby in or other "grave cloth". You do not come to life, from your mum's womb in a wrap, do you? unless you're a sorta alien. Regular smile It's about birth and death per se, not about any cloth. He kinda says "we are easy come, easy go" that our trip on this earth doesn't last forever

2/ I'm aware it's Egyptian, I'm not interfering in something I could be clueless in though. I do agree with you that there is a meaning of "ride/go" when used for a car, circus or any other occupation, but the song is about life, between life and death. The word "trip" is the most appropriate, as this "path" is kinda "unknown/mysterious".,

The translator got it right, really. .

Velsket    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 10:05

"what's this song about in the first place? Life, having fun and love."

The song is about the exact opposite of this... It is about the fact that life is finite and short... People betray you, you try to survive, then it ends.. I don't like to pick fights when people refuse to listen to native speakers of the dialect. This is especially true when it's about something VERY obvious to an Egyptian, which you are clearly not. This لفة thing is really clear to the extent that I am stating to you facts about what the word means in Egypt, it's not my opinion. Whether you want to ignore facts given to you by a native speaker of the dialect is up to you.

With all due respect, here are two other Egyptians who will tell you that your analysis displays poor understanding of the Egyptian dialect @Eagles Hunter @Toot_v

Cheers

Guest    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 10:10

"what's this song about in the first place? Life, having fun and love."

Oops, this phrase wasn't meant to be here. lol

Eagles Hunter    Fri, 25/05/2018 - 01:56
FranceA a écrit :

1/ I know it's Egyptian. This "لفة " is mainly used in Egypt. As for "".
لفة عين

What do you mean?

FranceA a écrit :

It's definitely not about the cloth you wrap the baby in or other "grave cloth". You do not come to life, from your mum's womb in a wrap, do you? unless you're a sorta alien. Regular smile It's about birth and death per se, not about any cloth. He kinda says "we are easy come, easy go" that our trip on this earth doesn't last forever

Sir, sorry for being harsh, but you can't be more WRONG!!!
It's definitely ABOUT the cloth you wrap the baby.
"You do not come to life, from your mum's womb in a wrap, do you?" Well, as an Egyptian I can give TENS of explanations for why they mean here a "Baby wrap" (Making a pun, comparing between man's first and last DRESS in life, considering السبوع as beginning of man's life, ....... etc). But, do idioms have to be RATIONALIZED? No they don't. They are taken, understood and used the way they are. As native speakers understand them.

Toot_v    Fri, 25/05/2018 - 02:01

This "لفة عين" thingy will probably boggle me for the rest of my life.

Guest    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 09:58

Spot on!

Velsket    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 10:07
3

Fair attempt. See above if you want to improve your translation.

Toot_v    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 15:32

Rolling eyes is a very common thing people do when they're fed up. In addition, you cannot "spin" your eyes, and the idea of someone coming into this world in a spin gives me a picture of giving birth in a car. Being born in a "لفة" as in coming from the mother's womb already wrapped is one example why you're missing the point of this song. There are loads of Egyptian songs which celebrate the birth of a baby with phrases like "اتولد في اللفة", simple as that. The "spin" line is taken very literally in this translation just like @Velsket explained, and it makes no sense.

Toot_v    Thu, 24/05/2018 - 15:35

One another note, kindly align your translation with the song lyrics because it looks confusion this way especially for non-Arabs.