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Transliterating into kana – is it allowed?

6 posts / 0 new
Editor of the obscure
Joined: 28.12.2015
Pending moderation

I was thinking about transliterating a Japanese song into kana, thinking such a text could be helpful for learners who don't want to be so dependent on rōmaji. I just need to ask, considering most other romanization systems are allowed (Hepburn, Kunrei, Russian and Czech romanization systems, etc.), is transliterating into kana also okay?

Moderator of Romance Languages
Joined: 31.03.2012

I think I mentioned such a thing before in the past and I didn't really deem it as "essential", but I thought it should perhaps be added as a category of its own "Transliteration (Hiragana)" (it was only a suggestion as this was aimed for users who didn't completely have a grasp of kanji and wanted to learn it like that) .

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011

Considering that there are some ambiguous cases of how to pronounce a kanji, even if context is given, providing the kana makes a lot of sense, even for people fluent in Japanese I suppose.

Novice
Joined: 17.06.2018

If the kanji is not commonly used, or at least in the way it's being used, even novels provide "yomigana" ("reading kana," when you see it written above/to the side of the kanji real small).

That being said, for some reason there are translation requests where they've romanised the entire song. Anyone who can provide a real, helpful translation is not gonna be able to read that. All in kana is gonna be not quite as confusing, but leaving it in its original text is best. Kanji gives the sounds context.

Moderator and Scholar of a Dark Age
Joined: 16.02.2011
chairdesklamp wrote:

If the kanji is not commonly used, or at least in the way it's being used, even novels provide "yomigana" ("reading kana," when you see it written above/to the side of the kanji real small).

"yomigana"? I only recall hearing them being called "furigana"

Novice
Joined: 17.06.2018

It has more than one name.

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