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Lyudi nadoeli (English translation)

  • Artist: Molchat Doma (Молчат Дома)
  • Song: Lyudi nadoeli
  • Translations: English

Lyudi nadoeli

Дикие люди не пугают меня
Социум не в моде - в моде пустота
Закрывают двери, не пускают в себя
Люди надоели....
Дикие люди не пугают меня
Социум не в моде - в моде пустота
Закрывают двери, не пускают в себя
Люди надоели, надоел им и я
 
Мне больше незачем мечтать
Их лучше взять и потерять
Их больше незачем любить
Их надо взять и отпустить
И я не буду себе лгать
И я не буду больше ждать
Я лучше перестану спать
И буду тихо умирать
 
Ходишь мимо, острый взгляд
Проникает он как яд
Спотыкаюсь об него
Люди надоели....
Ходишь мимо, острый взгляд
Проникает он как яд
Спотыкаюсь об него
Люди надоели, надоело им все
 
Мне больше незачем мечтать
Их лучше взять и потерять
Их больше не зачем любить
Их надо взять и отпустить
И я не буду себе лгать
И я не буду больше ждать
Я лучше перестану спать
И буду тихо умирать
 
Submitted by David BurdaDavid Burda on Wed, 25/09/2019 - 07:27
Last edited by sandringsandring on Wed, 23/10/2019 - 15:25
English translationEnglish
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I've had enough of people

Wild people do not frighten me.
Society is not fashionable. Emptiness is.
Doors are being closed, people shut you off.
I've had enough of people.
Wild people do not frighten me.
Society is not fashionable. Emptiness is.
Doors are being closed, people shut you off.
I've had enough of people, and they of me.
 
Dreaming has become pointless
Better just lose them
No more reasons to love them
Better just let them go.
I won't lie to myself
I'm done waiting
I'd better stop sleeping
and quietly let myself die.
 
Another sharp look as I walk by,
that pierces and poisons me,
tripping me up.
I've had enough of people.
Another sharp look as I walk by,
that pierces and poisons me,
tripping me up.
I've had enough of people, and they of everything.
 
Dreaming has become pointless
Better just forget about them
No more reasons to love them
Better just let them go.
I won't lie to myself
I'm done waiting
I'd better stop sleeping
and quietly let myself die.
 
Do whatever you want with my translations.
They no more belong to me than the air I breathe.
Submitted by silencedsilenced on Mon, 21/10/2019 - 04:09
Added in reply to request by SoaringHeightsSoaringHeights
Last edited by silencedsilenced on Fri, 25/10/2019 - 17:14
Author's comments:

That's Joy Division with the ghost of Ian Curtis speaking in tongues Regular smile

More translations of "Lyudi nadoeli"
English silenced
Molchat Doma: Top 3
Comments
Pinchus ZelenogorskyPinchus Zelenogorsky    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 04:21

> Мне больше не за чем мечтать
Правильно - "незачем". It's useless to dream
> Ходишь мимо ,острый взгляд
Это обращение к "острому взгляду". Взгляд ходит мимо, не он.

silencedsilenced    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 04:28

Could the "не за чем" be intentional? He seems to pronounce it as three separate words.

Ходишь мимо -> or could the subject be an implicit "ты", as if he spoke to some arbitrary individual?
This is a common stylistic device in French, but I don't know if Russian has an equivalent.

Pinchus ZelenogorskyPinchus Zelenogorsky    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 04:50

"Незачем" определенно слитно - одно слово.
> Ходишь мимо ,острый взгляд
Тут возможны варианты
1. Я иду мимо, а острый взгляд (на меня) проникает (в меня) как яд
2. Он обращается к острому взгляду: "Острый взгляд, ты ходишь мимо"
Оба варианта не слишком грамотны. Выбирайте.

silencedsilenced    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 05:15

I am baffled by this Russian...

How come "Ходишь мимо" means "Я иду мимо"? That shifts from 2nd to 1st person. I could understand that if he kept a consistent use of the 2nd person to actually mean the first, we can also do that in French.
But he actually uses 1st person in the 3rd line. That seems pretty inconsistent to me. Such a mix would make very little sense in French, at any rate.

AlmitraAlmitra    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 09:14

We make this shift in Russian when the action is repeated or habitual (the actor in this case is you), especially when doing so is annoying, troublesome or futile.
E.g. Учишь вас, дураков, учишь (я учу), а толку ноль.
Ходишь (я хожу) каждый день мимо ее дома, а она тебя в упор не видит.

silencedsilenced    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 09:30

Ok, now I get it. Thanks.
Something similar is also possible in French and in English, like in this "Sixteen Tons" classic.
The exact circumstances of use might be a bit different, but I assume it's the same idea?

AlmitraAlmitra    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 09:43

Yes, that's more or less the idea. It's just that English prohibits the omission of the subject in this case, while in Russian the omission is habitual, and you have to get the meaning from the context.

silencedsilenced    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 09:54

Yes indeed, the subject pronoun is the only formal difference between present and imperative (both in French and English) so removing it is not really an option.

IgeethecatIgeethecat    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 05:21

Пустить в себя - it’s like let in, like share something private, just FYI

silencedsilenced    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 05:32

Ok, thanks. That's what I guessed. So would you say my translation of that line is more or less OK?

IgeethecatIgeethecat    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 05:48

Personally, I don’t like shut off, but it is close enough

silencedsilenced    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 05:34

OK guys. Sorry for being dense, but this really makes no sense whatsoever to me.

Ходишь мимо ,острый взгляд -> [2nd person]walk by, sharp look
Проникает он как яд -> he/it soaks like poison
Спотыкаюсь об него -> I stumble upon him/it

How could "sharp look" be the subject of that sentence? Even assuming a sharp look could walk the streets, what would the "он/него " on the next two lines stand for?

The only possible meaning I see is: as I walk by, [I get a] sharp look that soaks me like poison and trips me up.
That is, assuming the 2nd person is a stylistic device similar to French or English, meaning "your average guy" while it's really about the narrator (a kind of disguise for the 1st person, so to speak; like in this classic).

IgeethecatIgeethecat    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 05:44

It’s about the other person he is talking about now
Ignores him, but her eyes
Poison him
And make him stumble upon the poison vial, I guess

silencedsilenced    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 05:59

OK, so that would be like "ты ходишь мимо и кидаешь острый взгляд на меня, который меня проникает как яд и о которого я спотыкаюсь", right? (well, sorry for the typos, it's just to make my point)
who this "ты" actually is is left to the imagination of the audience, but I suppose that might be either his sweetheart or just anyone of these boring people.
Please oh please, tell me I got it right Regular smile

silencedsilenced    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 06:04

about "shut off" I suppose it will be understood as "seclude", right? I can't really think of a replacement.
"People seclude me"? "People cloister me away"? Sounds even worse, doesn't it?

Pinchus ZelenogorskyPinchus Zelenogorsky    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 11:12

Я думаю сейчас, что "ходишь мимо" - это постоянное действие героя. Например он каждый день проходит мимо газетного ларька и продавец кидает на него "острый взгляд". Если бы это было единоразовое действие - было бы "идешь мимо".

silencedsilenced    Mon, 21/10/2019 - 11:17

Yep, that makes sense.

SoaringHeightsSoaringHeights    Tue, 22/10/2019 - 04:18

"That's Joy Division with the ghost of Ian Curtis speaking in tongues."

Yep. That's what makes Молчат дома much more interesting than other neo-Post-Punk bands like Interpol or Bloc Party. They genuinely sound like they're from the early or mid '80s. Perhaps unsurprisingly, they enjoy the poetry of Boris Ryzhy

Thanks for the translation.

silencedsilenced    Tue, 22/10/2019 - 04:31

Agreed. They are quite good at recreating the mood. As you may have noticed, their Russian is well outside my comfort zone, so I might not be able to tackle other songs of theirs, but I wish a better translator would.

SoaringHeightsSoaringHeights    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 05:42

Your Russian is better than mine.

It seems others are already taking a crack at this, so hopefully, this can all be refined into a proper translation.

Pinchus ZelenogorskyPinchus Zelenogorsky    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 10:09

>Just grab them and drop them.
Может быть я плохо понимаю этот оборот. Отпустить - to let them go, to put out of my head

silencedsilenced    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 10:16

You're right, that was an attempt at using short verbs for aesthetics, but that turns out to be confusing.
what about "use them and discard them" (like tissue, basically Regular smile ) ?

Pinchus ZelenogorskyPinchus Zelenogorsky    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 10:20

Думаю, хорошо. Но пусть лучше более знающие английский люди прокомментируют.

silencedsilenced    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 10:24

Indeed. I'll put that for now and change it if something better shows up.

AlmitraAlmitra    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 10:48

In my opinion, "взять и" has nothing to do with grabbing or taking anyone. In Russian, we often use "взять" as a verb intensifier. E.g. Возьми и купи эту куртку, если так нравится. In most contexts, "возьми" can be replaced with "just" or "simply".
In your case:
You can just get rid of them (or whatever fits your context).

silencedsilenced    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 10:57

Quite interesting. I had never noticed that.
So what about "just forget them" (потерять) and "just discard them" (отпустить)?
Or what would you suggest?

AlmitraAlmitra    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 11:10

I'd go with something like this:
- Их лучше взять и потерять.
It's best to simply/just lose 'em all. (As when someone wants someone gone, they might tell you, 'Lose him' in English).
- Их надо взять и отпустить.
You should just let them go.

But I'm not a native English speaker, so take it as an IMO.

silencedsilenced    Thu, 24/10/2019 - 18:21

I'm not familiar with that use of "lose", except as in "shaking someone off" (in a car chase, for instance). It can also mean "puzzle someone" as in "you've lost me there". So I wonder if that would be explicit enough. I'll pick something different just to be on the safe side, though it's probably just my English.

AlmitraAlmitra    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 10:07

Sure, it's your translation. Personally, I don't think one can find a safer option than "lose" (Russian: потерять) without trying to "explain" the author instead of translating them. But I'm sure you'll figure it out eventually.

silencedsilenced    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 16:39

I'm just stuck in a case of understanding neither the Russian nor the English. I simply can't use "lose" if I'm not convinced it means something. Which is most certainly due to my lack of understanding, but I'd rather put a footnote and let the reader decide than give him a "lose" I don't understand.

In French, using the most common equivalent "perdre" for people would simply make no sense in that context.
For the English, "lose" has more than a dozen meanings. In French you would use 4 or 5 different verbs to render them all. Most of them don't imply something voluntarily done to people. The only such meanings I can think of are "shake off (a pursuer)" and "confuse (someone in a discussion)". You can't lose people like you lose weight, or can you?
Now for the Russian, I simply have no idea what is meant. Is it "do without people" or "ignore them" or "get rid of them" or something else? I don't know.

GavinGavin    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 16:39

Sure, you can lose people people or things - it's like discard in that case.

Lose that shirt - it doesn't suit you.
He's an idiot, you should lose him.

silencedsilenced    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 17:13

Well thanks, that's just what I lacked. So that's like "'get rid of", right?
I scoured dictionaries and could not find a single example of voluntarily losing anything but body fat Regular smile

GavinGavin    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 18:14

Yep, get rid of / get shot of.

silencedsilenced    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 18:20

Looks like Russian and English being in perfect agreement with a nonplussed French standing in the middle Regular smile

GavinGavin    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 18:30

Ben (gallic shrug) débarrasser ? C'est tout ? Regular smile

silencedsilenced    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 18:38

Yes, but "perdre" would make no sense whatsoever. You need to change the verb. That's why "lose people" sounded so alien to me.
On the other hand, "потерять" is apparently a much closer equivalent of "lose", that can be used in that sense without problems.

BratBrat    Fri, 25/10/2019 - 18:38

If one tends to lose people or things very often, they might be a loser. (Works in Russian too, but in a bit different way). Regular smile

silencedsilenced    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 10:45

Dang... I've had enough of not being an editor. Regular smile
[@sandring] Nadia, would you kindly remove the first "надоело им все" (verse 2) and fix this disgracious comma in "мимо ,острый"?

silencedsilenced    Wed, 23/10/2019 - 17:43

Thanks for getting rid of these silly "you are there" signs too Teeth smile

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