Cicerenella (English translation)

English translationEnglish (poetic, rhyming)
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Cicerenella

My good-looking, sweet Cicerenella!
 
She kept her plot, and, guess what, - lately
With wine and water she irrigated.
But then, she watered it with no jug.
Such was her garden and her luck!
 
She had a pussy cat, this lady,
Blind kitty was too crooked, flaky!
That kitten being dragged by tail,
Thank God she didn't own a whale!
 
Cicerenella had a brawny rooster,
Rode him overnight with no booster!
That's why we dance for you this tarantella:
She had an awesome cock, Cicerenella!
 
This lady had a handsome donkey,
For whom a hood she tailored, swanky!
He never ever shew his skin, nor bone,
But always in his assy cap he shone!
 
Now, let me tell you of Cicerenella's hen:
Who laid an egg and then at night, again.
Cicerenella gave that chick cornmeal.
Oh, this madame is such a deal!
 
Cicerenella liked her yard to b'bright,
She had it lit up the whole night!
She liked it bright with a mighty lamp.
This was Cicirinella's plot of land!
 
Signiora had a barrel made of oak.
What flows in from the top, - thru bottom soaks,
The vessel has no lid, no strainer,
Cicirinella's got a nice container!
 
This lovely lady had a cabin
Where 'e parked 'er horse and 'er wagon.
And her bicycle on top she'd stuck.
Such was Cicirinella's lovely shack!
 
She had her special skillet, "la bella",
She'd fry her eggs with mozzarella.
She had 'em with her broomstick stirred,
Her frying pan surprised the world!
 
Oh, this good-looking sweet Cicerenella!
 
Thanks!
thanked 7 times
This is a poetic translation - deviations from the meaning of the original are present (extra words, extra or omitted information, substituted concepts).
Submitted by wisigothwisigoth on Mon, 19/10/2020 - 17:18
Last edited by wisigothwisigoth on Sun, 25/10/2020 - 17:52
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NeapolitanNeapolitan

Cicerenella

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Translations of "Cicerenella"
English P,Rwisigoth
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Comments
SpeLiAmSpeLiAm    Sat, 24/10/2020 - 21:05
5

Супериссимо!

Конечно, фантазии предостаточно, но настолько красивой фантазии, что отклонения не в счет, да если еще учесть попадание в размер и соблюдение рифм, - просто блеск!
Попробую сотворить русскую версию, но для этого понадобится время, сейчас занят срочным заказом.
Если сможете до этого сделать сами русский перевод, тем будет интереснее..

SpeLiAmSpeLiAm    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 09:57

Спасибо за ссылку, Эдуард!
Тогда я уж переводить не буду - не такая это выдающаяся вещь, чтобы делать из неё коллекции...
А перевод Евгения действительно замечателен.

Pinchus ZelenogorskyPinchus Zelenogorsky    Sat, 24/10/2020 - 21:18

Эдуард, у Вас то Cicirinella, то Cicerenella. Может так и надо, я понял только, что это не Cinderella, но на всякий случай решил этот факт отметить.

wisigothwisigoth    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 01:00

Благодарю, недосмотрел.

SchnurrbratSchnurrbrat    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 01:32

Eduard,
May I ask what's the point of these unusual contractions?
>> Where 'e parked 'er horse and 'er wagon.
Even one should rise eyebrows, but three in one line is way too much.
In my understanding, contractions are used in English to facilitate pronunciation, I don't see how 'er is more fluent than "her".
Also, contractions could be used in poetry to cheat and to squeeze a word into some tricky meter, but it must be a vowel which gets contracted. Again, it is not the case here, no syllables were saved, one still will have to pronounce 'e, 'er.

fav'rite > special (if you need a two-syllable adjective) for her skillet
What's the meaning of your first line - She kept her plot? I didn't get it.

wisigothwisigoth    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 04:39

..... He would say, in the Palmerston:

“Th’ gaffer come down to our stall this morning, an’ ’e says, ‘You
know, Walter, this ’ere’ll not do. What about these props?’ An’ I says
to him, ‘Why, what art talkin’ about? What d’st mean about th’ props?’
‘It’ll never do, this ’ere,’ ’e says. ‘You’ll be havin’ th’ roof in,
one o’ these days.’ An’ I says, ‘Tha’d better stan’ on a bit o’ clunch,
then, an’ hold it up wi’ thy ’ead.’ So ’e wor that mad, ’e cossed an’
’e swore, an’ t’other etc etc

Sons and Lovers. D. H. Lawrence

Imitation of a local accent. Used to demonstrate how the text would sound to a speaker of modern Italian

SchnurrbratSchnurrbrat    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 05:16

This fine quote is something altogether different, since it is an example of direct speech, taken in quotation marks, and this allows pretty much everything: bad grammar, drunken profanity and even occasional hiccups Teeth smile
Your line is an ordinary text as far as I could judge.

wisigothwisigoth    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 08:10

OK, - my idea is still valid. *Make believe* the local accent - the song is a mini-performance, too. It has a local flavour, complete with a "return address".

SchnurrbratSchnurrbrat    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 16:22

A poet could do whatever he/she wants to do, bending rules a little. It's totally your choice.

Ww WwWw Ww    Sun, 25/10/2020 - 02:09

Kept her plot = she had a garden (tended to/maintained it). In the Neapolitan context.

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