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Aşıkların Sözü kalır (English translation)

Turkish
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Aşıkların Sözü kalır

ey şehvet uğruna aşkı tepenler
yalan ile dolan ile dünya kuranlar
 
güç ile ün uğrunda gözü dönenler
paraların önünde yeri öpenler
 
(x2)
haklı haksız bir gün elbet
elbet bel' (belli) olur
ben deyim üçyüz yılda
sen de el' (50) olur
 
(x2)
aşıkların sözü kalır
 
(x2)
yürü bre hızır paşa
senin de çarkın kırılır
güvendiğin padişahın
o da birgün devrilir
 
(x2)
aşıkların sözü kalır
 
ey iktidarda donup kalanlar
kendini kendinden üstün sananlar
 
fazla laf ile bomboş fikir saçanlar
garibi ezip de gurur duyanlar
 
(x2)
haklı haksız bir gün elbet
elbet bel' (belli) olur
ben deyim üçyüz yılda
sen de el' (50) olur
 
Last edited by silencedsilenced on Thu, 19/11/2020 - 15:33
English translationEnglish
Align paragraphs

Lovers' Words Remain

Versions: #1#2
Ey, the ones who spurn the love for the sake of lust
The ones who build a world with a pack of lies
 
The ones who have steam coming out of their ears1 for the sake of power and fame
The ones who kiss the dust before the money
 
(x2)
The right and the wrong will one day
Become perceptible2for sure
Says me, in three hundred years
Says you, in fifty years3
 
(x2)
Lovers' words remain
 
(x2)
Way to go, the Hızır bashaw
Your wheel shall go to pieces as well
That padishah that you relied on
Will surely lick the dust4 one day
 
(x2)
Lovers' words remain
 
Ey the ones who stand stock-still5 in the rulership
The ones who think they have the edge over everybody6
 
The ones who pass jibber-jabber opinions with tedious words
The ones who hold the birds' noses to the grindstone and plumes on7
 
(x2)
The right and the wrong will one day
Become perceptible for sure
Says me, in three hundred years
Says you, in fifty years
 
  • 1. Seeing red
  • 2. Come to light
  • 3. Basically, they're having a hard time describing how many years will it take for the right and the wrong to become perceptible
  • 4. "Be overthrown" but this way it covers the meaning even better
  • 5. Petrify
  • 6. They think they're better than everyone
  • 7. They take a pride in their behaviour, they treat the Birds like dirt, which could mean "Orphan" here the word "Bird", it's basically someone that you feel pity for
Thanks!
thanked 4 times
Submitted by AverAver on Sun, 22/11/2020 - 11:38
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Translations of "Aşıkların Sözü kalır"
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Comments
silencedsilenced    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 17:58

Great! The metaphors are a treat and I absolutely love the message of the song.

Just a few more questions if you don't mind:

Hızır bashaw -> is that a super ruler title ("vizier pasha" like "his majesty our royal higness the king") or two different titles (hey you viziers and pashas !), or the name of an actual character or something else I have no clue about?

holds the birds' noses to the grindstone and plumes on -> The (bad) guy sharpens the bird's beak and then grooms its feathers???
I suppose you'll end up with an outraged, hurting and moderately more dangerous bird, but that seems like a peculiar thing to do Teeth smile

AverAver    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 14:56

Hey!
Glad you like it!

Bashaw — yes, like you said, it's just like that and also you can say "Pasha" which is like the same thing!

Bird — well, I explained it! It's like an orphan, someone who got no one, bird is like a vulgar slang here, think of it as a jailbird, but lose the "Jail" Regular smile

I would say "Tread under foot" would be a great way to say it! Much simpler and more apprehensible!

silencedsilenced    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 15:10

Right, the viziers and pashas are sorted Regular smile

Still I got a bit lost in the footnotes.
I get the idea that "bird" really means "lowlife" or something, but I guess the whole metaphor would still require a note on its own, if it's equivalent to "tread under foot". I'm all for letting the readers get a taste of the literal meaning, but maybe put it in the note and use the less colourful but more directly comprehensible English instead?

AverAver    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 15:27

Hmm, "Low life" is a bit too heavy for "Garip"
It's like pitiful, pitiful ones, low-life stroke me as an insult here, waaay to heavy!
On the contrary they're the people that you feel pity for

Here's a simple explanation — They1treat the Garip/s2 like dirt and they actually take a pride in their behaviour

This could've been "Pitiful ones" too, but then again, it'd be gratuitously long...

Edit: Changed the footnotes, they're more apprehensible now!

  • 1. The ones
  • 2. Birds
silencedsilenced    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 16:28

It's fine by me. The meaning is clear and the English colourful.
I've seen the band in Paris 12 years ago or so, and this song stayed stuck in a corner of my head ever since.
I'm glad the lyrics turned out to be as good as I expected.
Thank you, you made my day!

AverAver    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 16:33

Monumentally welcome, anytime!

MichaelNaMichaelNa    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 15:04

You might want change either all “the ones” to “the one” or vice versa so that all the subjects agree with all the verbs that follow them, as either “the one who spurns” or “the ones who spurn”.

AverAver    Sun, 22/11/2020 - 15:08

Whoops, sorry Tongue smile
Calling it "The ones" is an indispensableness here but I removed all the "S" !

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