About "Eloikainee"

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<a href="/en/translator/mickg" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1435159">MickG</a>
Joined: 07.10.2019
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I transcribed the Hebrew text in the video at https://lyricstranslate.com/en/avraham-fried-eloikainee-lyrics.html#comm.... Could you check I copied right? Also:

1. Isn't אֱלֹקֵינוּ "Eloqeynu"? Why is it being sung as Eloykayni?
2. Is ד׳ = הַשֵׁמ when spelled out?
3. Before וְהַרְוַח לֶנוּ, there is always something like "ohoy", does that mean something or is that just an invocation of sorts? How should it be spelled? I tried to guess;
4. The line מְהֵרֶה מִכָּל צָרוֹתֵינוּ to me reads "m'hareh mikol tsorotainu", but I hear it sung as "naymehayeru mikol tsuruysayni": what's up with that? I assume "nay" is again some invocation, and tried to spell it.

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<a href="/en/translator/ogingero" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1352420">OgingerO</a>
Joined: 08.09.2017

Mick It's Elokeinu is a name for G-d - see https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/the-name-of-god
It's written sometimes as Elohim or Elokim by some so they take it one step further to not use Elohim. When it has something on the end - like nu or ni -it's a possessive suffix - sometimes called a proniminal suffix (like our, his, my). see: https://qr.ae/pGsmAc Avraham Fried and other Orthodox singers inject a bit of .. Yiddish-ness I guess you can say, into their speech and singing so their pronunciation is also different than standard Hebrew, especially with vowels A/O/I (why you are hearing different pronunciations as you referenced in your #1) and using S instead of T sounds (like they use Shabbos instead of Shabbat).
3. that's just singing Oy (as In: Oh my, or Woe - https://jel.jewish-languages.org/words/424 ).
4. The reason what you are seeing and what you are hearing is so different is because of the Yiddish influenced pronunciation. I find it difficult to even do transliterations for songs I know - when they are sung by Orthodox because their pronunciation is so off from what I am used to hearing it's hard to decipher.)

I think that's it. I'm not Orthodox or Israeli, I am Jewish though. so that's my perspective. If you do have Yiddish questions I can ask my family about the pronunciation. I'm not a fan of Orthodox music - because the pronunciation makes me a bit nuts, but my mum, who is a native Yiddish speaker thought it sounded great ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

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<a href="/en/translator/ogingero" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1352420">OgingerO</a>
Joined: 08.09.2017

ד׳ = הַשֵׁמ

HaShem, the mem at the end should be a mem sofit = https://www.cartoonhebrew.com/mem-sofit
I don't know what the dalet with a geresh is. I have to ask about this and get back to you.

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<a href="/en/translator/ogingero" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1352420">OgingerO</a>
Joined: 08.09.2017

Ok I asked an Israeli about the dalet with the geresh, He said:
because it's a "cleaner" version of ה' which is a short of the name (HaShem).
cleaner meaning: ה is a holy letter

yeah יוד and הא are both considered holy
and the geresh shows it's shortened
like
ר' for רבי
ש' for שעה
the only word which is shortened but doesn't have a geresh is ד"ר

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<a href="/en/translator/mickg" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1435159">MickG</a>
Joined: 07.10.2019

Could someone here comment my translation of this song? https://lyricstranslate.com/en/eloikainee-our-god.html

What are the base forms of these verbs?

1. רְעֵנוּ | Rë`ênû;
2. זוּנֵנוּ | Zûnêjnû;
3. פַרְנְסֵנוּ | Farënëṣênû;
4. וְכַלְכְּלֵנוּ | Vëkhalëkëlênû;
5. וְהַרְוִיחֵנוּ | Vëharëvijḥêjnû.

These are verbs with -nû as the object and (for the last two) vë "and" tacked onto the start, right? Or are they actually nouns with -nû meaning "our"?

What is וְהַרְוַח | Vëharëvaḥ besides the leading vë "and"?

Is מְהֵרֶה | Mëhêreh the adverbial form of mahêr "quick, fast", thus meaning "quickly, speedily"?

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<a href="/en/translator/ogingero" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1352420">OgingerO</a>
Joined: 08.09.2017

Use https://pealim.com , it will help you

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<a href="/en/translator/mickg" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1435159">MickG</a>
Joined: 07.10.2019

Here's what I get from that:

1. Rë`ênû | רְעֵנוּ: closest thing I find is רֵעֵנוּ | Rê`ênû "our friend", but it has a tzere where there should be a sheva;
2. Zûnêjnû | זוּנֵנוּ: zûn is the imperative 2s masc. of לָזוּן | lɔzûn "to nourish", so assuming "nourish us" adds a suffix -ênû I'm done with this;
3. Farënëṣênû | פַרְנְסֵנוּ: closest I can get is פַּרְנָסֵנוּ | parënɔsênû "our elder", but the ɔ is an ë in our text; not sure if I missed a dagesh on that initial letter; perhaps this has to do with פַּרְנֵס!‏ | parënês "support!" (imperative 2sing masc of lëparënês), maybe adding "us" corresponds to adding -ênû and turning that ê to another ë?
4. Vëkhalëkëlênû | וְכַלְכְּלֵנוּ: perhaps כַּלְכֵּל | kalëkêl "support!" (imperative 2sm of lëkhalëkêl) with the usual ê->ë and addition of -ênû? What is the difference between lëparënês and lëkhalëkêl? I assume the k of the imperative kalëkêl loses its dagesh because of the initial vë-?
5. Vëharëvijḥêjnû | וְהַרְוִיחֵנוּ: all I find is הִרְוִיחַ | hirëviyaḥ "benefit!" (imperative 2sm of lëharëvviyaḥ), I'd guess the usual -ênû addition gets rid of the -a- in -akh, how come we have harëvijḥênû if the imperative has harë-?
6. Vëharëvaḥ | וְהַרְוַח: closest I get is הַרְוֵחַ | harëvêaḥ "benefit!" (imperative 2sm of lëharëvviaḥ), but what is going on with those vowels?
7. Mëhêreh | מְהֵרֶה: I find nothing there, but https://context.reverso.net/translation/hebrew-english/%D7%9E%D7%94%D7%A... tells me it means "soon" or "quickly"; I guess it is the adverb form of mahêr after all.