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[SOLVED] What does "harries" mean?

17 posts / 0 new
LT-Website Translator
Joined: 09.01.2018
Pending moderation

Hi, it's again me! Tongue smile I've got another question: What does the word "harries" mean in this song and in general? Some other lyrics websites say it is short for "earring", but I couldn't find it in any dictionary. Any help is – again – appreciated.

Editor
Joined: 16.02.2016

Hi. There's no "arry" in that song.

Member
Joined: 13.10.2018

The word shows up in the song as "harries". I couldn't find anything online about it. I guess it might have been a mishearing of "hairies", which could mean hairy coats, hairy boots etc.? Or it's just another mysterious British slang term

Editor
Joined: 18.10.2015

Harries are a Cockney slang for "earrings" The initial "h" is never pronounced in Cockney. That's why it does sound like "Arries"

LT-Website Translator
Joined: 09.01.2018

Okay, thanks!

Moderator and Incorrigable
Joined: 03.06.2016

Regular smile

Member
Joined: 31.08.2018

Hi sandring. Would you mind telling SiHo in which country you live. (I already know.)

Super Member
Joined: 13.04.2017

Hey buddies, ain't it this idiom mentioned in the lyrics?
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/put%20on%20airs
At least it makes much more sense than earrings...

LT-Website Translator
Joined: 09.01.2018

Well, in the song, you can clearly hear the sound [i] between [r] and [s], so "airs" doesn't really fit – unless the [i] exists there due to a dialect. Wink smile In fact, it really would make more sense.

It seems this topic isn't solved yet…

Editor in search of Anningan & Malina
Joined: 10.05.2012

The song is sung in a (beautiful) Cockney accent, but the intrusion of an "i" there is not a feature of said accent. I've come in contact with multiple people during my life who spoke with a Cockney accent (some more than others), so I'm 100% sure 'arries is simply earrings, as [@sandring] has already suggested. While the idiom mentioned may make sense in the context of the song, it doesn't in the specific sentence: "put your boots and airs on"? Nah.

Editor
Joined: 18.10.2015

A Cockney saying "Put on airs"????? It must be a joke. It's for those who went to a public school rather Regular smile

Super Member
Joined: 13.04.2017
DarkJoshua wrote:

The song is sung in a (beautiful) Cockney accent, but the intrusion of an "i" there is not a feature of said accent.

Yeah, it's the feature of phonetics. Just try to sing "put your airs on" to the original music - and you'll find that an "i" sound will appear automatically, whether you're a Cockney or not.
This is called epenthesis -> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epenthesis
Wink smile

Super Member
Joined: 13.04.2017
sandring wrote:

A Cockney saying "Put on airs"????? It must be a joke.

Yeah, those harries always have their airs on. *lol*

Editor in search of Anningan & Malina
Joined: 10.05.2012

If you're American maybe. Whoever has a non-rhotic accent would never put an "i" between the "ai" diphthong and the "s" of "airs".

Super Member
Joined: 13.04.2017

May be, may be... Let it be 'harries' from now on, and then a true Cockney may pay a visit to this thread to enlighten us...

Editor
Joined: 11.10.2014

If think (but it's 10 years since I last heard any cockney, so maybe I think wrong) that your harries are whatever gear you've got that makes you look flash when you wear it ("Harry Dash" is rhyming slang for flash).

Editor
Joined: 18.10.2015

Yep, Tom. The first time I heard a Cockney speaking I thought it was Dutch. And they do rhyme things so one has to be very quick-witted to follow their conversation.

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