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Explaining an idiom - a humble request

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Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/israelwu" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1420592">IsraelWu</a>
Joined: 04.05.2019
Pending moderation

I like looking at idioms and their explanations published here. Sometimes I learn something and sometimes I "discover" I used an idiom while for me it was "instinctive" phrase, known from reading, from hanging around (is it an idiom ? :-) with native speakers etc. What really "makes my 'fuses' jump" (Hebrew idiom - literal translation) is wrong (or even worse - half wrong) explanation. Would it be too much asking people for some self control? If you just think you know the idiom but you don't really know the language, hold your breath (literally, not an idiom), rethink, try to recall the source/situation of acquiring your knowledge. If you are sure take a risk otherwise please restrain yourself and leave it to native speakers for our common benefit. Having enough problems with "unpublished" idioms do we need problems with wrongly explained idioms as well?

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/israelwu" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1420592">IsraelWu</a>
Joined: 04.05.2019

It's marvelous, not even 12 h from my request and somebody who "studied English" explains to us what an eyesore is. Literally it's a colloquial reference to a bacterial inflammation of the eyelid. It hurts, you've got a sore eye, it passes after a few days , quite a long way from cataract he was frightening us with. As an idiom it means some view that's unsavory, ugly, that makes your eyes hurt but just figuratively. Luckily I am old enough to have an eye sore in my past and old enough to remember what a punishment cataract used to be for people who like to read.

Moderator of Romance Languages
<a href="/en/translator/carnivorouslamb" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1109697">phantasmagoria</a>
Joined: 31.03.2012

Hello,
I understand your frustration, LT is slowly trying to manage what users have submitted and unpublishing them along the way. Unfortunately your message won't reach all users, hopefully users that feel the same way will speak out in your thread.

- Ellen

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/uncommon" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1414669">Schnurrbrat</a>
Joined: 07.03.2019

There is "not an idiom" button available. Regular smile

Moderator of Romance Languages
<a href="/en/translator/carnivorouslamb" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1109697">phantasmagoria</a>
Joined: 31.03.2012
Schnurrbrat wrote:

There is "not an idiom" button available. Regular smile

There is, example: https://imgur.com/EuQUZjm

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/israelwu" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1420592">IsraelWu</a>
Joined: 04.05.2019

I know, but usually these are young people, admittedly overconfident. Still, I didn't want to shame them or discourage them just to recheck what they submit. Often it, actually, is an idiom but the explanation is incorrect or even more dangerous - half correct and I've seen one incorrect while others, in other languages, were correct (or I didn't know the language). Perhaps we need a button "Wrong explanation". OK, if I meet a lot of them I"ll start pushing the button. And once again, we see that life does offer more than binary choices :-).

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