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Why am I a bad translator?

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Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/rahela244" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1106967">treeoftoday244</a>
Joined: 28.02.2012
Pending moderation

Has any of you guys ever asked yourselves this question or it's just me wondering how come I'm not able to produce quality translations.No matter what I do , how much I read it seems I could never write high quality translation even in my own native language . I would say you have to be talented to write good translations and I'm obviously not talented at all .I was just wondering is that just me or have you ever felt this way?

Senior Member , Comrade Vlad
<a href="/en/translator/vladimir4757" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1407413">Vladimir4757</a>
Joined: 31.12.2018

I'm like that sometimes, sometimes I beat myself over my translations, other times I question the quality or my lack of linguistic skill with the Russian language. You've put out so many translations, I'm surprised you're feeling that way. Sometimes you just get burned out, sometimes you just cannot find the motivation and sometimes you just raise your personal bar too high and it overcomes you.

Don't worry though comrade. This helps me but try translating nonsensical songs...this always helps me when I get a burnout. It will always give you a laugh. And if I'm feeling particularly bad about my translations I'll throw the song into Google Translate just to see how good my translation is compared to a machine's attempt at translating.

Editor ,Leader of the Balkan Squad
<a href="/en/translator/crimsondyname" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1311076">crimsonDyname</a>
Joined: 14.10.2016

I think that all of us have our bad days and moments. None of us are "perfect", which is why feedback and constructive criticism are so useful, especially when it comes to translations. You don't always have to be "talented" or a prodigy when it comes to translations; if you have the drive to work hard and improve upon your work when necessary, you have what it takes.
I'd hug you, but it is sadly impossible to do so through a computer screen.  Teeth smile

Member
<a href="/en/translator/ahmad140" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1406835">Ahmad140</a>
Joined: 25.12.2018

I certainly feel so sometimes. What I feel the problem really is, however, is that I don't have any feedback, so I can't really know if the translation is good or bad (Arabic to English and English to Arabic are not really popular combinations, so there are not many viewers to produce feedback). The only solution I can manage is to forget about it and move on; maybe moving on can help Regular smile

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/jaurk" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1371471">jaurk</a>
Joined: 08.02.2018

Perfect translation does not exist.

If you read a translation you made yesterday, you'll be able to improve it today.

Don't worry so much about it :p

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011

depends what youre translating lyrics are harder than some document. if its something poetic you have to translate it and leave it alone for a day then read it (repeat the process) and you'll find something you can fix... its a bit of project lol shouldnt be discouraged if it doesnt sound right bc its better than no translation. granted having some doubt in your translation is important bc it keeps your mind open to finding things you can fix on it....nevertheless dont stop. keep practicing

Guest
Guest

This is no exact science. You need to get a feel for the original, and some inspiration for the translation.
The two limiting factors are your understanding of the original and your skill in the target language.

As other people said: in doubt, ask a native. Use the proofreading feature, state that you'd appreciate proofreading in your profile, look for people willing to proofread and ask them for help via PM.
As far as I'm concerned, especially in languages I don't master like Russian and German, helpful natives make all the difference between an awkward attempt and a decent result.

Editor
<a href="/en/translator/valeriu-raut" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1118259">Valeriu Raut</a>
Joined: 08.07.2012

I agree with jaurk.
Perfect translations do not exist.
You want to translate faithfully every word, to keep the rhyme and the rhythm,
to flow it naturally in the new language, to respect the feeling of the original song, and to create a singable translation.
It is too much, it is impossible.
And often you read a comment: you could have translated this word better; you have missed a nuance of style.
-
Stéphane Mallarmé was a French poet, English teacher and translator.
He had only the ambition of translating precisely, without rhymes or rhythm.
The poems he translated seem prose.
-
I don't dare to translate classical authors because many before me have already done it much better.
But I copy and paste these artistic translations.
And I notice something every time: the translators have taken their freedom.
In order to follow the feeling of the song, they invent a new text with own rhyme and rhythm.
Have we the courage to take our freedom, to do fairy good translations, and to resist criticism?
If not, we have to accept that after having done our best, we are unsatisfied with ourselves, or we read bad reviews about our translations.

Moderator
<a href="/en/translator/thomas222" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1310118">Thomas222</a>
Joined: 06.10.2016

Of course I ask myself that, every single day. Sometimes when I look at my older translations, I think to myself; "How could I've published this crap?! / This could be a little more accurate. / I wrote 'seat' instead of 'sit'! / Well, there's no other translation for this song, so guess I'll just keep it there until a better one comes along." I've seen some talented translators, and I've never considered myself a part of them. Ever.

Translating into English is not my forte, at ALL, or what I even love doing, but that's what most people want, so I do it. Translating into my native language is a lot easier for me, and sometimes I'm actually proud of the outcome. And that's very rare.

Sometimes I feel like people are sick of me translating for them, and therefore don't click the "Thanks" button. Like it's not me whom they wanted for the job. And they've clearly SEEN the translation! Some translations take me DAYS to accomplish, just for some stranger on the internet who doesn't even care that I gave them my personal time and effort.

And no matter how hard I try, even if I truly think I did a good job for once, I still haven't received a 5-star rating in so long, I wonder why do I even f*cking bother.

Sorry for ranting, I think that's just my self hatred speaking.

You're not the only who feels this way. And from what I see in your profile, you're actually really good! You're a contributing user. Please don't put yourself down like I do. And like other people said, there's no such thing as a "perfect" translation. As long as it delivers the message, is written nicely and is properly aligned, you're all good. Plus, you work for free. You owe nothing to anyone. Remember that.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Joined: 19.07.2018

Oohs. Self hatred?! I still listen to your translation! Don't you dare to put yourself down! I can tell you, people need instructions to hit a huge green button to download software - a tiny thanks button is completely unnoticed - they come, read, and leave... I translated a song that has 6000 some views and maybe 5 thanks. Lol. Good thing I have no attachment to it nor to my translation. We all make spelling and grammar errors - some are kindly pointed out, some viciously, and most are ignored. One user wisely pointed out that it is the spirit that counts the most! And if you feel like something is excellent or something needs help, reach out! Send PM. We are here.
Wait, I forgot, my translations are perfect as am I! Lol

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

LOL. I have the opposite problem. I think I write wonderful translations, it's proofreaders who tell me that my translations suck. LOL. In fact, I have had foreign speakers tell me that I don't know English, because they were taught something in their school which is obsolete in modern English. Well, keep trying. And, remember!!!! It's always better to get the MEANING across, rather than try to translate things literally. Word per word translations are almost always horrible. So, my advice is that you know your native language. Take the MEANING of the song's line, and then ask yourself, "How would we get this meaning across in my language?" Then translate that. You stand a very good chance of improving your translations. Plus, if someone points out a typo, just edit the song, fix it, and move on. Everyone makes 'em. Wink smile

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

LOL, I have responded to "translation requests". After doing the translation, sometimes I feel sad that I published it. Not because I did a crappy or shitty translation, but because the song itself was so shitty it should never have been recorded, in my humble opinion. LOL.
Oh, one last thing. I have been made aware that SOME POETRY and SOME SONGS are more important than others. In the USA, I guess those would be religious songs, where listeners consider every word sacred. And, I've notice that in Russian, their Poetry and historical or folk songs are very precious and important. I made the mistake of attempting to translate several important Russian songs, and believe me, they will defend those songs to the last бы. So, I steer clear of those types of songs, and now stay with pop stuff. People are far less critical with those songs. Wink smile Don't give up!

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/achampnator" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1317347">Achampnator</a>
Joined: 30.11.2016

THAT I ask myself from time to time 'specially when I get corrections that are like a half roman and I think...was it that bad? Well but I think everyone is learning out of mistakes even though they are really big but thats what learning means You make mistakes and others who know better point out these mistakes and correct them and next time in the same situation you know better but yeah I also have sometimes the feeling that I make a bad job but I think thats just because of the uncertainty.
So I try to move on after mistakes and try to make things better.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Joined: 16.12.2017
Phil Ambro wrote:

I have been made aware that SOME POETRY and SOME SONGS are more important than others. In the USA, I guess those would be religious songs, where listeners consider every word sacred. And, I've notice that in Russian, their Poetry and historical or folk songs are very precious and important.

So true. Some lyrics are so cryptic that the foreigners just cannot get them Wink smile

Quote:

I made the mistake of attempting to translate several important Russian songs, and believe me, they will defend those songs to the last бы.

Of course they will, it is sacred!!! [whatever “last бы” means] Teeth smile
Phil, I respect you, as well as many others foreigners for being open for natives’ advice and sometimes criticism Wink smile

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Joined: 19.07.2018

I find some lyrics are cryptic in any language, I admire transcribers of all languages - you have to possess a really good ear.
My advice is to persist, come back and improve on prior effort or move on, but don't beat yourself up!

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Joined: 01.07.2018

I can recommend a very interesting book from Efim Etkind , "The crisis of art. Experience of the poetics of poetic translation" (Кризис одного искусства. Опыт поэтики поэтического перевода). I read it in French ("Un art en crise, Essai de poétique de la traduction poétique", L'Age d'Homme, Lausanne 1982). The author gives very concrete and detailed examples (Pouchkine, Pasternak, Mandelstam, Schiller, Rilke, Latin and Greek poets, and many more). His point of view is that there is no such thing as an untranslatable poem, there are only lazy translators (this reminds me of the Russian saying, "There is no such thing as an ugly woman, what can be is: not enough vodka...") Regular smile

Senior Member , Comrade Vlad
<a href="/en/translator/vladimir4757" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1407413">Vladimir4757</a>
Joined: 31.12.2018
Jadis wrote:

There is no such thing as an ugly woman, what can be is: not enough vodka...

I need this on a t-shirt

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Joined: 19.07.2018

Not this one?
Husband and wife went to a doctor. Husband doesn't speak English. Wife asks Doctor, tell me the truth about my husband. Doctor replies that if she makes him 3 nutritional meals a day, doesn't nag, and makes love to him every night, the husband will be just fine. On the way back, husband asks wife what did the doctor say?
Wife answers: my dear, I'm very sorry, he said you won't make it....

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011

"6000 some views and maybe 5 thanks" lol are you sure youre not shadow banned?

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011

"Of course they will, it is sacred!!! ..." the problem with poems that have become "sacred" is that they sort of get calcified with cultural biases....just bc a poem was interpreted a certain way 500 years ago doesnt mean we do it a SERVICE by keeping true to that traditional "interpretation" when translating it into a new language.

when written there was life in those poem (so to speak) they resonated with the living and become part of that culture... when we translate "poetry" into a new language we should allow the speakers of that language to form their own distinct "bond" with the poem not force them to conform.
PLUS everything has been said, done & written there is nothing new under the sun.

Guest
Guest

A good translation requires a good understanding. If you don't understand the context, you're very likely to miss the point, however fluent you might be.

Let's take an example: unless you're already familiar with that unpleasant part of history, what would you make of these lyrics without a word of explanation?

The story was very obvious to any French native at the time it was written. Maybe less so for younger French people nowadays, and even less so for foreigners. What would be the point in this cryptic tale of women getting their heads shaved if not replaced in its historical context?
And even so, a couple of lines of explanations are not enough. You have to understand what the four years of German occupation felt like to fully appreciate the point of view of the author. And maybe then you will be able to render the proper tone of the story.
This is what I find great in translations. They can open windows on cultures, history, collective unconscious. Much more than the eye meets.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Joined: 19.07.2018

Not sure what that "shadow banned" is? I like comments - thanks, especially anonymous, are somehow meaningless. I'd rather get painfully blistering tirades or complaints, as well as praise... Lol
Maybe, all 6371-12 didn't like my translation? Lol. We can ask Vlad?
https://lyricstranslate.com/en/compromise-компромисс.html

Guest
Guest

I don't think LT resorts to shadow banning. That's more of a twitter thing, apparently.

Anyway, all this Internet glory is nothing but fool's gold, if you ask me. If you've done your best in good faith, you've got your own reward.
When desperate for a bit of cheering up, I'd rather eat dopamine pills than rely on random consumers clicking a green button.
My cheeky footnotes occasionally earn me more angry comments than thanks. So what? Putting myself among the pigeons is part of the fun. Meow!

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011

you must to be ONE with the pigeons.

i was joking about the shadow banning lol i'm no IT but i think he wouldnt have views or likes if he was shadow banned.

but yeah gotto be careful with dopamine bc like all drugs its addicting

Moderator of Romance Languages
<a href="/en/translator/carnivorouslamb" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1109697">phantasmagoria</a>
Joined: 31.03.2012

Well if a native is correcting you and you're neither native or fluent and think that a translation is either a) something you can throw against the wall until it sticks or b) just for shits and giggles (depending on the difficulty of the song, if it's something that's old or has a lot of references, either do your research or leave it alone, don't half ass it when you yourself don't understand it) then listen to them and improve, don't be afraid to ask more questions, always try to improve.

I'm confident in my translations, they hold mustard against someone with a flimsier or garbage translation that they did in 5 minutes just for points. So what if it gets no views, thanks or ratings? My intention was never any of those when I first joined, all I wanted was to translate music I liked and translate songs for those who wish to know what they song is about. I discover new music this way, even if a song or the music is trash, I'll still put effort into it and churn out a decent translation.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Joined: 01.07.2018
ingirumimusnocte wrote:

Let's take an example: unless you're already familiar with that unpleasant part of history, what would you make of these lyrics without a word of explanation?

Anayway, it's very impressive to see how Brassens made "Prusse" rhyme together with "rasibus"... and "postiche" with "ich liebe dich" ! Chapeau l'artiste !

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

"to the last бы". That's a mix of English and Russian. And, as happens always, it doesn't work. LOL.
In English we say, "They'll defend it to the their last breath". But, sometimes we replace "their last breath" with something more specific to what you're talking about. So, when talking about translations, I would say something like "They'll defend it to the last comma." So, I replaced "comma" (which apparently Russians use very infrequently) with something almost as useless "бы". And, yes, I know that in Russian бы is not useless, but when translating into English, Russian verb tenses are not translatable, so we have to use the most appropriate English verb construction, so in translating, a Russian бы is pretty useless. In all, just forget I said that. LOL

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

Indeed! However, if you make a T-shirt you should probably make it "There are no ugly women! As long as there's alcohol." (Or something like that. It needs to be shorter to fit on a T-shirt. LOL) It's still a wonderful saying. I'm surprised I've never heard an English equivalent to this. LOL.

Guest
Guest

I'd rather have picked this pesky "ведь". I'm sure they invented it just to confuse us poor Westerners Regular smile

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

LOL. Same joke, different version.
The Lone Ranger and Tonto are sleeping in the desert and a snake bites the Lone Ranger on his penis while he's sleeping. The Lone Ranger relaxes as Tonto rides off to the nearest town looking for a doctor. Finds a doctor, but he's too old and frail to ride out on a horse, so he tells Tonto that he has to suck the poison out from where the snake bit him, and spit the poison out. Tonto returns and tells the Lone Ranger that the doctor said the bite is fatal, and there's nothing he can do.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

I always translate Ведь as "Well,". It works most the time. It's just as useless as "Well," But, imagine a Russian trying to translate a California song with the singer interjecting "like" every two words. LOL.
I don't mind ведь. But, the annoying way every Russian sentence in a song has to start with an А or an И is very annoying to me, because I actually try to translate them. Now, I realize that Russians just feel obliged to say them before almost every line sung in a song.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Joined: 01.07.2018
Guest
Guest

Every language has its fillers. I find it quite funny to encounter calamitous equivalents to "baby", "yeah" or "singing" in French translations.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/andrew-parfen" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1328416">Andrew Parfen</a>
Joined: 19.02.2017

Speaking of fillers in Russian songs, you'll find them a lot for example in this song, and they are "zh", "zhe", "da", "nu", "oy"...
https://lyricstranslate.com/en/%D1%81%D0%B5%D0%BC%D0%B5%D0%BD%D0%B8%D1%8...

Guest
Guest

Some songs seem to consist mainly of filler words sometimes. (Oh, I’m so mean.)
A friend of mine made me realise how ‘tonight’ works as a filler when a word is lacking of a sentence for the sake of metric (big word for pop music). Many things that happen in pop songs do so ‘tonight’.

Guest
Guest

Hahaha don't get me started on this. Sometimes, when trying to answer translation requests, I'm at a loss for suitably empty French equivalents.
This one, for instance.
[crawling surreptitiously under the couch]

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

OK, well now I just don't translate filler words. I find that the most common English filler word (to add an extra syllable) is "just".
"I love your smile" = "I just love your smile."
LOL It's everywhere. No one should translate an English "just" unless it means "fair" or it's a matter of time, "I just got home." Just ignore it. LOL. Or should I say, "Ignore it." LOL

Guest
Guest

Actually, after a few decades of poorly translated TV series, your bloody "just" has polluted French, as has "in fact".
Now people routinely say the French equivalent of "in fact it's just great".
More than 80% fillers in a one-word sentence, that's hard to beat.

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011

i agree for the most part BUT coleman barks did amazing from scholarly word for word translations of rumis poetry from persian into english. coleman wasnt fluent in persian but he had the eye and you can youtube the rest.

i still think a translation is better than no translation

with that said i think we should also have a half ass option as label for translations

Guest
Guest

Haha I second that. A "click-lady-of-disputable-reputation" tag would help too.

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011
Phil Ambro wrote:

Indeed! However, if you make a T-shirt you should probably make it "There are no ugly women! As long as there's alcohol." (Or something like that. It needs to be shorter to fit on a T-shirt. LOL) It's still a wonderful saying. I'm surprised I've never heard an English equivalent to this. LOL.

we have the beer goggle expression

"There are no ugly women! As long as there's alcohol" thats a scary thought considering the fact "whisky dick" is a term for a reason lol but also bc alcohol industry and cultures built around alcohol will take the first hit of climate change...but hey light switch works.

fact: alcohol has a huge carbon footprint from farm to recycling the container it comes in...wont even get into the rest

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

That's just funny. In fact, we rarely say, "in fact" in English. In fact, we normally just say "just", which normally means, the same as "uh", which means absolutely nothing. I'm curious as to what that horrible American TV show was that used "just" so often that it was translated.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

That's a shame to learn that alcohol has a huge carbon footprint. But, I'm guessing that I have a carbon footprint ten times bigger than the alcohol industry. After all, I'm an American. I did go solar, does that count for something? Didn't think so. Sorry.

Guest
Guest

I don't know if it comes from English pop or TV series, but this "just" became ubiquitous quite recently, maybe in the last 10 years or so.
As for "in fact", I have no idea whence it came either. The snotty Mrs Granger seemed to use "Actually" a lot in her younger years, which was translated as "in fact", and France was not spared by the Harry Potter tsunami. Or maybe it's just a plain coincidence, actually.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Joined: 16.12.2017
Phil Ambro wrote:

Indeed! However, if you make a T-shirt you should probably make it "There are no ugly women! As long as there's alcohol." (Or something like that. It needs to be shorter to fit on a T-shirt. LOL) It's still a wonderful saying. I'm surprised I've never heard an English equivalent to this. LOL.

The original Russian saying is «не бывает некрасивых женщин, бывает мало водки» (all women are pretty if you consumed a LOT of vodka)
Russian women replied: «не бывает некрасивых мужчин, бывает мало вина» (all men are ugly unless you had a glass of wine) Teeth smile

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

Oh!!! Thank God!!! I came from a crappy British show!!! LOL I thought it came from an American show. LOL Actually, I find it quite funny. Whenever I try to do a British accent, I always start a sentence with "Actually..." That's quite British. And, quite funny for us Americans to say, especially with a British accent. In my opinion, I think that the funniest thing the British say is "bloody". It's quite nasty in American English. It seems as though the UK is covered in blood. LMAO. Conversely, I guess the USA is covered in F**k. Ha ha.

Super Member
<a href="/en/translator/brat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334845">Brat</a>
Joined: 13.04.2017
"Phil Ambro" wrote:

I guess the USA is covered in F**k

You mean "folk", of course... Teeth smile

Member
<a href="/en/translator/preslynn" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1396263">Preslynn</a>
Joined: 17.09.2018
Phil Ambro wrote:

Oh!!! Thank God!!! I came from a crappy British show!!! LOL I thought it came from an American show. LOL Actually, I find it quite funny. Whenever I try to do a British accent, I always start a sentence with "Actually..." That's quite British. And, quite funny for us Americans to say, especially with a British accent. In my opinion, I think that the funniest thing the British say is "bloody". It's quite nasty in American English. It seems as though the UK is covered in blood. LMAO. Conversely, I guess the USA is covered in F**k. Ha ha.

So British shows are automatically "crappy" but American shows are not??

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011
Phil Ambro wrote:

That's just funny. In fact, we rarely say, "in fact" in English. In fact, we normally just say "just", which normally means, the same as "uh", which means absolutely nothing. I'm curious as to what that horrible American TV show was that used "just" so often that it was translated.

lol maybe in the south where facts are pesky they dont use in fact often. what part of america are u in btw?

Phil Ambro wrote:

That's a shame to learn that alcohol has a huge carbon footprint. But, I'm guessing that I have a carbon footprint ten times bigger than the alcohol industry. After all, I'm an American. I did go solar, does that count for something? Didn't think so. Sorry.

carbon footprint is part of being alive i wouldnt feel that bad...in leed certification as it pertains to going green everything counts ...IN FACT going from alcohol to weed counts as going green so yeah def gratz on going solar :p

Senior Member
<a href="/en/translator/architectonic" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092078">architectonic</a>
Joined: 04.09.2011
Preslynn wrote:
Phil Ambro wrote:

Oh!!! Thank God!!! I came from a crappy British show!!! LOL I thought it came from an American show. LOL Actually, I find it quite funny. Whenever I try to do a British accent, I always start a sentence with "Actually..." That's quite British. And, quite funny for us Americans to say, especially with a British accent. In my opinion, I think that the funniest thing the British say is "bloody". It's quite nasty in American English. It seems as though the UK is covered in blood. LMAO. Conversely, I guess the USA is covered in F**k. Ha ha.

So British shows are automatically "crappy" but American shows are not??

yeah actually they are pretty crappy only good British show is Doctor Who. i dont care what you say

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<a href="/en/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Joined: 19.10.2018

I wish, but no.

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