[SOLVED] The HAKA

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Hi,

Check these guys out!

What are they saying?

Anyone know how to translate a haka?

<a href="/en/translator/kiwipower" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1085741">kiwipower</a>
Joined: 10.06.2011

In 2006, they had to change the ka mate because one coach found what they did at the end of it "offensive", so now if my memory serves me correctly there 2-3 different versions of it, but I could be wrong on that. Personally, nothing beats the original

<a href="/en/translator/maa-nonu" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1090840">maa nonu</a>
Joined: 17.08.2011

Slap the hands against the thighs!
Puff out the chest.
Bend the knees!
Let the hip follow!
Stomp the feet as hard as you can!
'I die, I die,
'I live, 'I live,
'I die, 'I die
'I live, 'I live,
This is the fierce, powerful man
...Who caused the sun to shine again for me
Up the ladder, Up the ladder
Up to the top
The sun shines!
Rise!

<a href="/en/translator/aotearoa" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1090905">aotearoa</a>
Joined: 18.08.2011

I have watched three of the four videos (one didnt work) of people doing the haka and have failed to see anyone do the haka right. I wonder if any of the people doing this haka are Maori. I also wonder if any of these people have learnt the meaning of this haka. There is a deeper meaning then just the translation. I wonder if people even know that 'Ka mate' comes from the ancient Moteatea (chant type song) 'Kikiki kakaka'. I also wonder if these people have got permission to do this haka from Ngati Toa (the tribe Te Rauparaha comes from) as they own the rights to this haka. I know the All Blacks have permission along with New Zealand sports teams providing they seek permission also.
Awesome to see 'Ka mate' being loved so much but as I have been told, You must respect all haka and the composers of these such haka and to me respect is knowing.

Question...........
Why do other cultures not practice the culture of the indeginous people to their land??? Australia Bribane missionaries could do a native aboriginee war dance to show respect to the indiginous people of Australia. Maybe the American Football teams (Im guessing are from America) could do a native american indian war dance to show respect to them.

<a href="/en/translator/furrion26" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092758">FURRION26</a>
Joined: 14.09.2011

The haka is from new zealand and the all blacks use it but it originates for my home land new zealand.

<a href="/en/translator/furrion26" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1092758">FURRION26</a>
Joined: 14.09.2011

I totally agree aotearoa, I dislike it when I see our haka performed by other country's sports team purely for entertainment (American football) it takes the meaning of the haka away and taints it with a cheep knock off feel.

<a href="/en/translator/lynette" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1097166">Lynette</a>
Joined: 10.11.2011

Can any one please help me to translate the HAKA in Afrikaans and in English

<a href="/en/translator/raylene-howe" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1103463">raylene howe</a>
Joined: 24.01.2012
Guest a écrit :

Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life
Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life

Tenei Te Tangata Puhuruhuru
This is the hairy man

Nana i tiki mai whakawhiti te ra
Who caused the sun to shine again for me

Upane Upane
Up the ladder Up the ladder

Upane Kaupane
Up to the top

Whiti te ra
The sun shines!

<a href="/en/translator/raylene-howe" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1103463">raylene howe</a>
Joined: 24.01.2012
raylene howe a écrit :
Guest a écrit :

Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life
Ka mate Ka mate
It is death It is death

Ka ora Ka ora
It is life It is life

Tenei Te Tangata Puhuruhuru
This is the hairy man

Nana i tiki mai whakawhiti te ra
Who caused the sun to shine again for me

Upane Upane
Up the ladder Up the ladder

Upane Kaupane
Up to the top

Whiti te ra
The sun shines!

<a href="/en/translator/raylene-howe" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1103463">raylene howe</a>
Joined: 24.01.2012

this is beautiful anna..

<a href="/en/translator/micha-polak" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1108785">micha polak</a>
Joined: 21.03.2012

i'm gratefull that i have discovered the haka (onely just now).it touches me.like all spiritual warrior traditions.I like your sugestion of wanting the usa and australia showing respect to the indiginous people.i'm afraid though that showing respect is not enough,doing a dance. it's nice don't get me wrong,but i say it's time they 'have' respect.until that happens there is no need for a dance. there is individuals ofcourse,but as a whole..... missionairies shouldn't do a wardance if there is no understanding of the unity of life.all is one. i say be proud

<a href="/en/translator/didula" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1112586">didula</a>
Joined: 06.05.2012

Kia rite
Kia rite
Kia mau
Hi
Ringa Ringa Pakia
Wae wae Takahia
e kino nei ho ki

<a href="/en/translator/jst22ing" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1115932">jst22ing</a>
Joined: 13.06.2012

I must agree, these haka are performed with alot of mana. Who did the translation????? You make it sound soul less, tenei te tangata puhuruhuru, is refering to someones ancestor, and not just a hairy man. Hes climbing to his understanding, not up a ladder, the sun is the understanding that he finds. Hes watching the land he grew up in clean itself from the war that his iwi has fought.
Its a challenge rather then a sad haka, for his people to rise again. Take a reo class people. You take a lot of the meaning away from these beautiful haka when you ask for "Translations". Why would the All Blacks get up in front of millions and haka about hairy men????

Its sad to see our national treasure translated so wrongly.

<a href="/en/translator/tonga5738" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1117393">tonga5738</a>
Joined: 28.06.2012

im part tonganbut dont undrstand the language. wierd

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/me4kata" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1143566">me4kata</a>
Joined: 28.11.2012

can you post lyrics on this one? translation is not quite needed, but if you want to, please, go ahead Regular smile

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/mohula" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1188069">MOHula</a>
Joined: 21.09.2013

jst22ing - I agree with your comments....allthough, the translations are word for word, the meaning was left out....when I was taught this haka, it was explained somewhat like this:

When one of tûpuna (elder) status [or one of great understanding of life, that has been there to look after the whânau] passes in this life form (Ka mate), another is expected to take on that responsibility (ka ora). The hairy man [generally speaking of a tûpuna status, "grandpa"] (Tenei te tangata puhuruhuru, nânâ i tiki mai whakawhiti te râ) that has always shown the light for the whânau (children, family). Arise, Arise! (Ûpane, ûpane), Arise to the highest potential [speaking of "us - as a people] (Ûpane kaupane whiti te râ!)....

It is sad to see this particular haka done in so many cases as one to "threaten" the opponant....when it is not really a threatening haka. This haka is one of deep poignant thought. "Who will lead us now?" should be your thoughts as you do this particular haka. I'm a Tongan/Hawaiian, but a respector of all of my Polynesian cultures....and I try to learn the proper, or correct traditions before performing a cultural dance....I'm now a kumu hula, and as such, ensure my haumâna (students) the proper mana'o (knowledge) for each dance learned - and the maori haka is one of them (specifically Ka Mate)....and another I've taught is "Tika Tonu," another with a powerful meaning....
I hope what I've posted would inspire those that read and have learned this haka to perform this haka with the proper respect that it deserves....yes, pûkana, and scream, rant and rave....but those that hear your ranting and raving, should hear the "strain" in your voice, and in your heart pleading for one you respect and honor....(a totally different voice setting from "I will eat you alive" screaming)....

Moderator of the Oceanic Realms
<a href="/en/translator/silentrebel83" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1082168">SilentRebel83</a>
Joined: 22.04.2011

Wow! I can't believe I hadn't noticed this thread before...

MOHula a écrit :

jst22ing - I agree with your comments....allthough, the translations are word for word, the meaning was left out....when I was taught this haka, it was explained somewhat like this:

When one of tûpuna (elder) status [or one of great understanding of life, that has been there to look after the whânau] passes in this life form (Ka mate), another is expected to take on that responsibility (ka ora). The hairy man [generally speaking of a tûpuna status, "grandpa"] (Tenei te tangata puhuruhuru, nânâ i tiki mai whakawhiti te râ) that has always shown the light for the whânau (children, family). Arise, Arise! (Ûpane, ûpane), Arise to the highest potential [speaking of "us - as a people] (Ûpane kaupane whiti te râ!)....

It is sad to see this particular haka done in so many cases as one to "threaten" the opponant....when it is not really a threatening haka. This haka is one of deep poignant thought. "Who will lead us now?" should be your thoughts as you do this particular haka. I'm a Tongan/Hawaiian, but a respector of all of my Polynesian cultures....and I try to learn the proper, or correct traditions before performing a cultural dance....I'm now a kumu hula, and as such, ensure my haumâna (students) the proper mana'o (knowledge) for each dance learned - and the maori haka is one of them (specifically Ka Mate)....and another I've taught is "Tika Tonu," another with a powerful meaning....
I hope what I've posted would inspire those that read and have learned this haka to perform this haka with the proper respect that it deserves....yes, pûkana, and scream, rant and rave....but those that hear your ranting and raving, should hear the "strain" in your voice, and in your heart pleading for one you respect and honor....(a totally different voice setting from "I will eat you alive" screaming)....

Thank you for providing this translation. It's very nice!
The problem about translating Pacific languages is that a single word can have several meanings depending on the context. But you certainly did an excellent job!

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/natec" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1207827">NateC</a>
Joined: 18.05.2014

MOHula, this is great insight into the true meaning of the haka. I'd suggest anyone interested in the haka watch this video of a New Zealand army battalion doing a haka for three fallen comrades who were killed in Afghanistan. It's the most powerful performance of a haka I've seen (although I'm no expert). I'm a US veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan and unfortunately have been to a few memorials - this haka is the most powerful, most fitting tribute to fallen comrades that I can imagine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xI6TRTBZUMM

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/jwhitehawke" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1250803">jwhitehawke</a>
Joined: 23.06.2015

KA MATE! KA MATE!
It is death! It is death!
We were at war
KA ORA! KA ORA!
It is life! It is life!
But now there is peace.
KA MATE! KA MATE!
We're going to die! We're going to die!
We thought we were all going to die
KA ORA! KA ORA!
We're going to live! We're going to live!
but now we are safe
TENEI TE TANGATA PU-HURU-HURU
This is the man, so hairy
because our leader, so strong and masculine,
NANA NEI I TIKI MAI, WHAKAWHITI TE RA!
who fetched, and made shine the sun!
has unified us and brought back the sunny days of peace!
UPANE! KA UPANE!
Together! Keep together!
We are all working in harmony, side by side,
HUPANE! KAUPANE!
Up the step! A second step!
making steady progress
WHITI TE RA! HI!
Out comes the sun! Ahh!
to prolong these sunny days of peace.

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/jwhitehawke" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1250803">jwhitehawke</a>
Joined: 23.06.2015
jwhitehawke a écrit :

KA MATE! KA MATE!
It is death! It is death!
We were at war
KA ORA! KA ORA!
It is life! It is life!
But now there is peace.
KA MATE! KA MATE!
We're going to die! We're going to die!
We thought we were all going to die
KA ORA! KA ORA!
We're going to live! We're going to live!
but now we are safe
TENEI TE TANGATA PU-HURU-HURU
This is the man, so hairy
because our leader, so strong and masculine,
NANA NEI I TIKI MAI, WHAKAWHITI TE RA!
who fetched, and made shine the sun!
has unified us and brought back the sunny days of peace!
UPANE! KA UPANE!
Together! Keep together!
We are all working in harmony, side by side,
HUPANE! KAUPANE!
Up the step! A second step!
making steady progress
WHITI TE RA! HI!
Out comes the sun! Ahh!
to prolong these sunny days of peace.

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/mariahh" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1274421">Mariahh</a>
Joined: 22.01.2016

Since 2006, the All Blacks have added Kapa O Pango, which was written in 2006 by Derek Llardelli, a haka composer, to their repertoire.

Kapa O Pango kia whakawhenua au I ahau!
Hi aue ii!
Ko Aotearoa e ngunguru nei!
Au, au aue ha!
Ko Kapa O Pango e ngunguru nei!
Au, au, aue ha!
I ahaha!
Ka tu te ihiihi
Ka tu te wanawana
Ki runga ki te rangi e tu iho nei, tu iho nei ihi!
Ponga ra!
Kapa O Pango, aue hi!
Ponga ra!

Translation:

All Blacks, let me become one with the land
This is our land that rumbles
It's my time! It's my moment!
This defines us as the All Blacks
It's my time! It's my moment!
Our dominance
Our supremacy will triumph
And will be properly revered, placed on high
Silver fern!
All Blacks!
Silver fern!
All Blacks!

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/rugby-union/new-zealand-rugby/ever-wondered-what-t...
Follow us: @smh on Twitter | sydneymorningherald on Facebook

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/mrtrik71" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1319094">Mrtrik71</a>
Joined: 14.12.2016

That Ancient Greek warriors (the only warriors that were bred for war from birth like the Spartans ) had one of the best Haka (Molon lave) which translates too "come and get it" warriors of old were the only true warriors of all nationalitys ,West Point in America still studies Greek warfare because it worked and always at huge odds won battles time after time.Greece never fought as a country ,small states or suburbs fought entire country's . The Maori Haka used to scare the hell out of the colonial land thieves.

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/alistair" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1340018">Alistair</a>
Joined: 31.05.2017

lool

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/ameria-phillipps" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1377089">Ameria Phillipps</a>
Joined: 29.03.2018

One of the problems of translations is that the Maori language is conceptual not literal. Ka Mate and Tika Tonu are both performed a lot and too many times the performers are not aware of the composition story nor the intent of the haka. Knowing these allows you to understand so much more than what is translated. Our language is not a written language, it is oral so it is simply not possible to translate these haka.
For instance Ka Mate, the story relates to the chieftains wife who was sitting on the kumara pit in which Te Rauparaha was hiding from his enemy. The enemy was using the power of a tohunga to find him with the intent to kill him. His life hung in the balance as the power of the 'woman' (women are life givers and are therefore tapu) weakened in ebbs and flows, the power of the tohunga. Finally when he realised that he had escaped death because of her, he praised her for making the sun shine again for him. Therefore I leave it to you to understand where the phrase 'this is the hairy man' comes from. The word for man is not included in the composition, but rather the word for body. Think about it and you'll understand. It is important before any haka is taught to anyone that the teacher give the whole background and story. Too much is lost otherwise.

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/ameria-phillipps" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1377089">Ameria Phillipps</a>
Joined: 29.03.2018

One of the problems of translations is that the Maori language is conceptual not literal. Ka Mate and Tika Tonu are both performed a lot and too many times the performers are not aware of the composition story nor the intent of the haka. Knowing these allows you to understand so much more than what is translated. Our language is not a written language, it is oral so it is simply not possible to translate these haka.
For instance Ka Mate, the story relates to the chieftains wife who was sitting on the kumara pit in which Te Rauparaha was hiding from his enemy. The enemy was using the power of a tohunga to find him with the intent to kill him. His life hung in the balance as the power of the 'woman' (women are life givers and are therefore tapu) weakened in ebbs and flows, the power of the tohunga. Finally when he realised that he had escaped death because of her, he praised her for making the sun shine again for him. Therefore I leave it to you to understand where the phrase 'this is the hairy man' comes from. The word for man is not included in the composition, but rather the word for body. Think about it and you'll understand. It is important before any haka is taught to anyone that the teacher give the whole background and story. Too much is lost otherwise.

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/mama-preston" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1384386">Mama Preston</a>
Joined: 01.06.2018

I watched the Haka In Memory of a Friend posted in Unilad and picked up by a radio staion. As I watched I was wracked by the grief I felt at the time and since on the discovery of the death of my older son coming up for four years this June. The anger the rage, the release of emotion in violent physical expression. its all there in the Haka.
Somethings transcend culture when experienced in context and in empathy with the emotions. Thank you New Zealand/Maori for sharing and allowing us elsewhere in the world to unite in the emotions. In Becoming One it is these transcultural expressions around the world which will eventually unite humanity. Than you.

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/ivy-tauranga" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1396031">Ivy Tauranga</a>
Joined: 14.09.2018

I would like to submit that this person is prophesying the coming of Jesus or what Jesus did (the hairy man, (a bearded man-how obvious can this be?) the man who brings peace). We thought we were all going to die...now we will live now we are safe because of the hairy man. Our people were very spiritual people and accepted the gospel when it was initially brought to our land. There is also a chief who prophesied of God sending His SON to set people free before the white man even came to this land. This is in our maori culture. I believe there were maori of the earlier generations who were open to God and heard His voice. If this haka is not prophesying and preaching the gospel of Christ then I don't know what is!!! Face it people, we're all going to die, and most people don't know what's going to happen when we die. In that sense the haka's opening statement is true, it is death it is death! But when Jesus came and died in our place and then rose again after 3 days, we thought we were going to die... we're going to live! Now we are safe! This speaks of, if we accept Jesus and the message of Love and Peace that He brings, then we will not taste of death. In the sense that we won't taste the ill-effects of death. Ie if we choose to deny Christ, we will also be denied entrance to life and peace in heaven with Him. Unfortunately, that's the facts. It's our decision, And so many people make a conscious decision everyday to deny God, or His Son, that He tried to reach out to us with.
Man this is so powerful.

Novice
<a href="/en/translator/ivy-tauranga" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1396031">Ivy Tauranga</a>
Joined: 14.09.2018

Lol they shouldn't exalt themselves, it'll probably lead to their downfall. It should never be about boosting their ego or exalting themselves. Bad move.
(in reply to Mariahh)