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Could someone listen to this song and correct the Italian lyrics?

12 posts / 0 new
Moderator
Joined: 28.07.2012
Pending moderation

I posted this song:

https://lyricstranslate.com/en/waa-wei-睡蓮-lyrics.html

I listened to it and the Italian lyrics are incomplete and I doubt that some parts are even correct. However, my Italian is not good enough for transcribing it myself. Could someone please tell me what the correct version of the lyrics would be?

Editor in search of Anningan & Malina
Joined: 10.05.2012

Mhhh... I had the impression that the Chinese lyrics are also to be corrected. There's no way she sang three short stanzas in three minutes. The Italian lyrics, except for the last stanza, are not only incomplete, but even wrong. He doesn't sing that. Plus at one point he sings "l'isola di mandorla sei tu", but because it's in the middle of the Chinese part, I have no idea where to put that part.
I'm going to submit another comment with the transcription of the Italian part, but we need someone to check the Chinese as well.

Editor in search of Anningan & Malina
Joined: 10.05.2012

I struggled to understand some words in there, mainly because they blend their words together as they sing, but this is what I could do:

[Chinese]

L'isola di mandorla sei tu (at 1:56)

[Chinese]

Polvere e folgore,
Prodigio e sfera,
Gemma di luce
A cui piace l'amore,
Stesa sul mare.
L'angelo del sogno
Cuce il respiro mio
Nel respiro tuo,
Dolce "yo-yo" (not sure about this last word... I hear "yong yong" in which case wouldn't be Italian.)

Variegata aria d'incenso,
Emera(?) è un'isola pace,
Occhi di mandorla,
Gote di chicca,
Cuore di cocca,
Bocca di bacca,
Lingua di labbra
Di te, di me.
Gioia giuggiola,
Che amor,
Quando è davvero un sogno

C'è la terra che disseta l'aria
Il tuo respiro serve al mondo
Per restare serio
E serio è il mondo che ho per te.

Super Member
Joined: 13.03.2016

The Italian translation up above is quite perfect.
Nevertheless the meaning is hard to understand because of the text itself. But, you know, sometimes in poetry not all is clearly understandable.
They actually mention "yo-yo", which, as you surely have experienced, is a kind of wheel with a thread which is falling down from your hand and returns up more times.
And this is perhaps the meaning the author wanted to give: a sensation, a feeling, coming and going, close and then far and back again.

Moderator
Joined: 28.07.2012
DarkJoshua wrote:

Mhhh... I had the impression that the Chinese lyrics are also to be corrected. There's no way she sang three short stanzas in three minutes.

Given your suggestion, I pasted the Chinese part of the lyrics here: https://www.purpleculture.net/chinese-pinyin-converter/

The Chinese lyrics are alright. She says what's written and nothing more and nothing less (at least in pronunciation; can't say anything regarding the accuracy of the ideograms).

DarkJoshua wrote:

At one point he sings "l'isola di mandorla sei tu", but because it's in the middle of the Chinese part, I have no idea where to put that part.

The placing is easy with the transcription, so I put it before the last stanza where it's sung.

DarkJoshua wrote:

I'm going to submit another comment with the transcription of the Italian part, but we need someone to check the Chinese as well.

I looked for "emera" in the dictionary and it doesn't seem to mean anything? Do you have any alternatives that might have been said? I submitted the lyrics with your (?) because I don't speak Italian and couldn't do any better than you at attempting a transcription.

Thank you. If anyone thinks they can improve the transcription, I welcome any ears. I want to be able to request a translation. Regular smile

PS. @DarkJoshua, I gave you credit in the "Submitter's comments" section. You can modify the attribution if you wish (or translate it to Italian)

Editor in search of Anningan & Malina
Joined: 10.05.2012

I looked into "emera" as well, but I didn't found anything... but it's what I hear. Thought it might have been "è vera", but the M is really clear. That specific line is gramatically weird anyway... but a second set of ears would really be appreciated, because at this point I want to understand what the say there as well.

Thank you for crediting me. Wasn't necessary, but I really appreciate it. I just hope someone can help us more.

Super Member
Joined: 13.03.2016

"Emera" hasn't got any meaning in Italian.
The only thing I can think of is a personal name (but never heard before in Italy) or a name from the Greek mythology (Emera was the personification of the day/daylight).

Moderator
Joined: 20.09.2015

DarkJoshua's transcription seems perfect.

Just a couple of considerations:

"Gemma di luce / a cui piace l’amore"
should be "Gemma di luce / cui piace l’amore"
which is correct - though very formal/archaic - Italian.

Also, it could be "dolce Yong-Yong" indeed. Is that a common Chinese name?

I agree with "Eméra".
The whole song is far from colloquial Italian, so it's not strange that they chose a line like:
"Eméra è un’isola-pace"
And, maybe such a costruct is common in Chinese?

"Quando è davvero un sogno" is very unclear to me.
What I hear is [ˈkwanːdo dɛɱˈvɛːɾɛun sɔˈɲoːː] and that doesn't make sense like that.
I think that the stress is messed up because of metric needs, so we can guess that the last word is "sogno".
The one before might be Denver, though I don't see how it could fit the song’s meaning.
The only sensible thing that comes to mind is "Questo davvero è un sogno", though it's strange that this line is pronounced so badly, while the other lines are all very good Italian (except for the female voice’s /r/ and /l/).

Novice
Joined: 15.01.2019

I listened the song and the lyrics is correct!
Ciaoooo Regular smile

Novice
Joined: 15.01.2019

I listened the song and the lyrics is correct!
Ciaoooo Regular smile

Moderator
Joined: 28.07.2012
Stefano8 wrote:

DarkJoshua's transcription seems perfect.

Just a couple of considerations:

"Gemma di luce / a cui piace l’amore"
should be "Gemma di luce / cui piace l’amore"
which is correct - though very formal/archaic - Italian.

Also, it could be "dolce Yong-Yong" indeed. Is that a common Chinese name?

I agree with "Eméra".
The whole song is far from colloquial Italian, so it's not strange that they chose a line like:
"Eméra è un’isola-pace"
And, maybe such a costruct is common in Chinese?

"Quando è davvero un sogno" is very unclear to me.
What I hear is [ˈkwanːdo dɛɱˈvɛːɾɛun sɔˈɲoːː] and that doesn't make sense like that.
I think that the stress is messed up because of metric needs, so we can guess that the last word is "sogno".
The one before might be Denver, though I don't see how it could fit the song’s meaning.
The only sensible thing that comes to mind is "Questo davvero è un sogno", though it's strange that this line is pronounced so badly, while the other lines are all very good Italian (except for the female voice’s /r/ and /l/).

Should I just write "Quando Denver è un sogno?" I doubt that makes any sense. Davverò makes more sense but at the same time it's not what they say? I don't know what to do in these situations. I will apply your corrections.

edit: I corrected it all and relistened to it. I noticed that what I hear is [dɛɱˈvɛːɾun] instead of [dɛɱˈvɛːɾɛun]

Moderator
Joined: 20.09.2015

I don't know; that's what I can hear, though it makes vary little sense.
I'm not saying that "denver è" is better that "davvero"

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