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L'âge d'or (English translation)

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French

L'âge d'or

Nous aurons du pain
Doré comme les filles
Sous les soleils d'or
Nous aurons du vin
De celui qui pétille
Même quand il dort
Nous aurons du sang
Dedans nos veines blanches
Et le plus souvent
Lundi sera dimanche
Mais notre âge alors
Sera l'âge d'or
 
Nous aurons des lits
Creusés comme des filles
Dans le sable fin
Nous aurons des fruits
Les mêmes qu'on grappille
Dans le champ voisin
Nous aurons bien sûr
Dedans nos maisons blêmes
Tous les becs d'azur
Qui là-haut se promènent
Mais notre âge alors
Sera l'âge d'or
 
Nous aurons la mer
À deux pas de l'étoile
Les jours de grand vent
Nous aurons l'hiver
Avec une cigale
Dans ses cheveux blancs
Nous aurons l'amour
Dedans tous nos problèmes
Et tous les discours
Finiront par « je t'aime »
Vienne, vienne alors
Vienne l'âge d'or
 
Submitted by Gavin on Thu, 26/05/2016 - 15:11
Last edited by Joutsenpoika on Fri, 21/10/2016 - 20:58
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English translation

The golden age

We will have bread
Golden like the girls
Under the golden suns
We will have wine
The one that sparkles
Even when asleep
We will have blood
Inside our white veins
And most often
Monday will be Sunday
But then our age
Will be the golden age
 
We will have beds
Dug like girls
In the fine sand
We will have fruit
The same ones we scrump
In the neighbouring field
We will have for sure
Inside our dull houses
All the pecks of blue
That promenade above
But then our age
Will be the golden age
 
We will have the sea
Two steps from the star
On windy days
We will have winter
With a cicada
In its white hair
We will have love
Within all our problems
And all conversations
Will finish with “I love you”
Come, so come
Come the golden age
 
Submitted by Gavin on Thu, 26/05/2016 - 15:11
Last edited by Gavin on Thu, 28/07/2016 - 16:24
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Comments
petit élève    Thu, 28/07/2016 - 16:11

The one that sparkles -> "pétiller" as "sparkle" would rather be used with eyes or stare. Here I'd rather say "fizz". But maybe that's my English.

qu'on grappille -> more like "snatch", "pilfer" here, I think ("le champ voisin" could also be "le champ du voisin" :))

maisons blêmes -> I think Ferré uses a rather literary register here, which would make "blême" closer to "dull" or "sombre"

becs d'azur -> He uses the same name in "Le chien" and frankly I don't know what he means. On the other hand I'm no Ferré savvy.
From the context it looks like birds, but Google remains deaf to my prayers on the subject.

tous les discours -> I see no arguments there. More like "paroles" (i.e. whatever a person will say, it will always end with love).

Gavin    Thu, 28/07/2016 - 16:22

Ah, "sparkles" is better for wine than "fizzes" in english. Fizzy drinks are usually water or soda but wine sparkles.

Grapille - Ah ok, more of a sense of theft. I could have used 'scrump' but that usually only refers to apples.

Maison blêmes - right, I wasn't quite sure what he meant by pale houses.

becs d'azur - seems to mean little bits, little patches. In English we some call that a 'peck' but it's rather old fashioned (a peck of pickled pepper)

discours - ah ok - more just general conversation here

thanks. :-)

petit élève    Thu, 28/07/2016 - 16:33

Hehe I like the idea behind these pecks, but I would risk one of my 9 lives to get the original meaning nevertheless. Meow!

Gavin    Thu, 28/07/2016 - 16:24

I thought this phrase was quite odd too:

Nous aurons des lits
Creusés comme des filles
Dans le sable fin

petit élève    Thu, 28/07/2016 - 16:27

That's rather poetic indeed. "creusé" evokes the curve of a woman's back, so it could be understood as "we will carve in the sand beds that are are curved like a woman's back"