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Los caminos de Serkeci (English translation)

English translationEnglish
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The Paths of Serkeci

The paths of Serkeci1
were filled with sand
I passed them to come back
to come back to see you, morena*.
 
You're morena*, I'm moreno*,
come, we'll get together
If it does not please you to meet,
come, we will marry.
 
When we begin to get together
with beers and soft drinks,
in the end, we took our leave
words cold as ice.2
 
Your father promised me,
fields and vineyards.
I don't want you, Lordette3
not even as a sink plug.
 
  • 1. Sirkeci/Serkeci: is an area in the Eminönü neighborhood of the Fatih district of the city of Istanbul, Turkey. (Source:) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirkeci.
  • 2. This part literally translates as "Words of ice", but I took more liberty with translating that.
  • 3. Pasha means "...was a higher rank in the Ottoman Empire political and military system, typically granted to governors, generals and dignitaries and others. As an honorary title, Pasha, in one of its various ranks, is equivalent to the British title of Lord...". Since the song is about a man wanting the fields and vineyards (the wealth) the woman's father has to offer, he wants her less and less. By "Pasha", he is perhaps calling her "Lordette", the daughter of a Lord. - Thanks Bárbaro for helping me figure this one out.
Thanks!
thanked 5 times
Submitted by líadanlíadan on Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:10
Last edited by líadanlíadan on Tue, 06/12/2016 - 16:54
Author's comments:

*= I didn't translate 'morena/moreno', because it can mean a dark skinned person, a dark haired person, brown/ebony or brunette (dark haired). You may interpret it however you like.

Ladino (Judeo-Spanish)Ladino (Judeo-Spanish)

Los caminos de Serkeci

Translations of "Los caminos de ..."
English líadan
Comments
BárbaroBárbaro    Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:19

"...is a Turkish word – it means a high-ranking official and represents a kind of machismo..."

Indeed, Pasha means an official of Ottoman Empire. The title ceased to be used in 1934. The song is from the 20th century, so I think the rank title was perhaps still used.

But seeing it as "machismo" seems to be playwright Jane Mushabac's pollitically correct vision of it.

líadanlíadan    Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:22

So is the man referring to the woman as "Pasha"? Or is he calling her father that? Unless the word is being used to describe someone with wealth/power/position and not necessarily meaning an official.

BárbaroBárbaro    Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:30

I really have a problem understanding whom it refers too. It could be the girl, obviously in another sense that is not of an official or could these two sentences alone be in the voice of the girl, to the man? In either case, it seems not to match.

But indeed it describes someone with wealth, power and position. In portuguese, for instance, it refers to an hedonistic rich man. Seems to match.

2 Derivação: sentido figurado. Uso: informal.
homem influente e desaforado
3 Derivação: sentido figurado. Uso: informal.
homem preguiçoso e que vive no fausto
4 Derivação: sentido figurado. Uso: informal.
homem que tem diversas amantes; sultão

líadanlíadan    Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:45
Bárbaro escribió:

I really have a problem understanding whom it refers too. It could be the girl, obviously in another sense that is not of an official or could these two sentences alone be in the voice of the girl, to the man? In either case, it seems not to match.

But indeed it describes someone with wealth, power and position. In portuguese, for instance, it refers to an hedonistic rich man. Seems to match.

2 Derivação: sentido figurado. Uso: informal.
homem influente e desaforado
3 Derivação: sentido figurado. Uso: informal.
homem preguiçoso e que vive no fausto
4 Derivação: sentido figurado. Uso: informal.
homem que tem diversas amantes; sultão

It might be the girl he's referring to, as it says in the A/N you left from the site: "The song tells the story of an enamoured man who -after visiting his beloved several times seems to be more interested in her father's vineyards and wine that in the lady herself."

There is no title for a women with Pasha, and then there's this: "As an honorary title, Pasha, in one of its various ranks, is equivalent to the British title of Lord...". But I'm certain it's a reference to someone rich/powerful. In the song, the man wants that, the father's vineyards and fields, and not the girl.

BárbaroBárbaro    Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:49

As if she was a Lord's daughter and he says "I don't want you, Lordette". That's make sense now.

líadanlíadan    Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:52

You're right, that makes more sense. I'll change the word, but leave a note about it.

BárbaroBárbaro    Wed, 13/11/2013 - 00:57

I think it's ok the way you left it, as Pasha and a note. But now we know better what it meant!

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