Tausend Mann und ein Befehl (English translation)

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English translation

A Thousand Men, And One Directive

Versions: #1#2
For a thousand days in a strange sector,
They marched forward, he and his battalion.
He swore his allegiance to the wrong men.
Still yet a child, and already its innocence was lost.
 
Do not think it over!
Get in formation!
You must follow orders!
Onward in lockstep!
March!
 
Open fire, Now!
Don't delay!
Do your duty!
Onward in lockstep!
March!
 
War! Never again!
Somewhere in a distant land,
They set the world ablaze.
A thousand men, and one directive.
One directive!
 
War! Never again!
A cruel fate strikes,
Today it's me, and tomorrow it will be you.
A thousand men, and one directive.
One directive!
 
Stand your ground,
Stand your ground,
Stand your ground!
 
For a thousand days he's been on the front,
With empty eyes he stares toward the horizon.
Every man wanted to go to the field with pride,
Later they cried while dying, for their mother!
 
We want you to be strong and tough!
Devour them or die, soldier!
Onward in lockstep!
March!
 
Fight for your fatherland!
Whoever refuses to, will be shot!
Onward in lockstep!
March!
 
War! Never again!
Somewhere in a distant land,
They set the world ablaze.
Thousand men and one directive.
One directive!
 
War! Never again!
A cruel fate strikes,
Today it's me, and tomorrow it will be you.
A thousand men, and one directive.
One directive!
 
War! Never again!
War! Never again!
War! Never again!
War! Never again!
War! Never again!
Never again...
War! Never again!
 
Somewhere in a distant land,
They set the world ablaze.
A thousand men, and one directive.
One directive!
 
War! Never again!
A cruel fate strikes,
Today it's me, and tomorrow it will be you.
A thousand men, and one directive.
One directive!
 
Stand your ground,
Stand your ground,
Stand your ground,
Stand your ground,
Stand your ground!
 
Submitted by Ww Ww on Sat, 05/01/2019 - 08:03
Last edited by Ww Ww on Tue, 08/01/2019 - 03:59
Author's comments:

1. sector = region (military equivalent)
2. Open fire, Now! literally, shoot already!
3. Lockstep is no longer used (only in garrison duties or as dictated by terrain and security). This was prevelent when combat formations were
in organized echelons against an enemy that was at close quarters on the field. It emphasized unity as well.
Lockstep is still used in riot formations when it provides a psychological advantage with rhythmic steps (sounding like thundering). It's called 'stomp and drag then because the left foot is brought up raised, the right foot is slid up creating a drag noise.
4. Devour or die is the literal translation, paraphrased to English it would be close to do or die, or Chew them up and spit them out, or die. Devouring is more of predation, the strong consuming the weak. In war sentiments toward the enemy are always made callused. It is a way of coping with its destruction.

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German

Tausend Mann und ein Befehl

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Comments
sandring    Sat, 05/01/2019 - 16:36
5

That's what I call a translation! Thank you! :)

Ww Ww    Sat, 05/01/2019 - 23:21

Thank you.

Hansi K_Lauer    Sun, 06/01/2019 - 00:23

>"Friss oder stirb, Soldat!" = "Devour them or die, soldier!"
I'd say that's a bit too literal translated.
"Friss oder stirb" is a general German phrase, meaning as much as "take it or leave it" (succeed or fail) or "do or die".
That they have connected here with "Soldat" is a little bit of an artistic play on a phrase, because "stirb, Soldat" offers a too tempting connection for an artist/lyricist not to take advantage of it.
"Devour them" is not the intended meaning in this case, although it might seem comprehensible.

Ww Ww    Sun, 06/01/2019 - 00:28

It's more "do or die". "Chew 'em up and spit 'em out" adage. But the artist made the choice of death and upped the severity.
Nothing written in stone. Always editing. Will contemplate other variants. 'Devour them' is more to transfer a hatred toward the enemy.