Где Же Вы Теперь, Друзья-Однополчане | Gde zhe vy teper', druz'ya-odnopolchane (traducción al Inglés)

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Где Же Вы Теперь, Друзья-Однополчане | Gde zhe vy teper', druz'ya-odnopolchane

Майскими короткими ночами,
Отгремев, закончились бои.
Где же вы теперь, друзья-однополчане,
Боевые спутники мои?
 
Я хожу в хороший час заката
У сосновых новеньких ворот;
Может, к нам сюда знакомого солдата
Ветерок попутный занесёт.
Может, к нам сюда знакомого солдата
Ветерок попутный занесёт.
 
Мы бы с ним припомнили, как жили,
Как теряли трудным вёрстам счёт.
За победу мы б по полной осушили,
За друзей добавили б ещё.
 
Если ты случайно неженатый,
Ты, дружок, нисколько не тужи,
Здесь у нас в районе, песнями богатом,
Девушки уж больно хороши.
Здесь у нас в районе, песнями богатом,
Девушки уж больно хороши.
 
Мы тебе колхозом дом построим,
Чтобы было видно по всему:
Здесь живёт семья советского героя,
Грудью защитившего страну.
 
Майскими, короткими ночами,
Отгремев, закончились бои.
Где же вы теперь, друзья-однополчане,
Боевые спутники мои?
 
Где же вы теперь, друзья-однополчане,
Боевые спутники мои?
 
Publicado por ΔvΔv el Lun, 22/07/2019 - 23:01
Editado por última vez por Andrew ParfenAndrew Parfen el Jue, 01/08/2019 - 05:18
traducción al InglésInglés
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Where Are You Now, My Friends Fellow Soldiers

Versiones: #1#2
In the short nights of May,
The fightings rumbled for the last time and came to an end.
So where are you now, my friends fellow soldiers,
My comrades in arms?
 
At a pleasant hour of the sunset
I hang around my new gates made of pine,
Hoping that some soldier I know
Would be brought up over here by a fair wind.
Hoping that some soldier I know
Would be brought up over here by a fair wind.
 
We both might have things to remember:
The hardships of war,1 the miles we'd been losing count of...
We'd drink it down to the Victory,
We'd pour one more - to our fallen friends.
 
If by any chance you're still not married,
My friend, there's nothing to be worried about,
Our neighbourhood is rich in songs,2
And the girls here are really nice.
Our neighbourhood is rich in songs,2
And the girls here are really nice.
 
All our kolkhoz3 would help you to build your house,
A good one, so that everybody could see:
Here lives a family of a Soviet hero,
Who risked his life4 defending our country.
 
In the short nights of May,
The fightings rumbled for the last time and came to an end.
So where are you now, my friends fellow soldiers,
My comrades in arms?
 
So where are you now, my friends fellow soldiers,
My comrades in arms?
 
  • 1. Literally: the way we lived (being soldiers in the line).
  • 2. a. b. He means "Here in our neighbourhood people like going out and singing together in the evenings or at weekends - a great chance for a young man to meet his soul mate."
  • 3. Kolkhoz = collective farm in the Soviet Union
  • 4. Literally: Who defended his country by his chest.
Publicado por Andrew ParfenAndrew Parfen el Jue, 01/08/2019 - 05:09
Agregado en respuesta a un pedido hecho por ΔvΔv
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Comentarios
SchnurrbratSchnurrbrat    Jue, 01/08/2019 - 05:17

Seems to be an excellent literal translation, Andrew.
Minor suggestions if you don't mind:
comrades in arms > brothers in arms (you can keep comrades to preserve Soviet reference, but on the other hand, you're using miles there, so...)
I would use plural for gates.
PS. I'm envious of those 2a 2b footnotes. Must learn Regular smile

Andrew ParfenAndrew Parfen    Jue, 01/08/2019 - 05:41

Thank you, 42!
Not really too literal, left footnotes where I wasn't able to translate better.
Gates - OK
Brothers in arms, comrades on armes - really don't know which is better, let Finn decide, he's native, okey?
What's "2a 2b footnotes"?
Thanks! Regular smile

ΔvΔv    Mié, 21/08/2019 - 01:38

I really liked what you've done, you've done an excellent job. I've posted another version based on what you've done with some minor changes. I tried to keep it as literal as possible, let me know if I did something I should not have.

I am intrigued by your foot note about the neighborhoods. Is this a literal meaning, or an assumed meaning? Furthermore, was this kind of activity common place?

Andrew ParfenAndrew Parfen    Mié, 21/08/2019 - 15:36

Hi, Av! I'm glad you liked my translation, and I left a comment on your translation too. Regarding the foot note about the neighborhoods, it is an assumed meaning, the literal one is in the translation itself. I'm not that old to remember that times, and I never was a "kolkhoznik", but I watched a lot of soviet era movies about people who worked at "kolkhozes". They worked hard from early in the morning, but after work they would usually go out in the evening to get together, play their accordions and sing songs, young men and young women, walking along the village streets, singing and laughing and flirting each other...

ΔvΔv    Jue, 22/08/2019 - 00:11

Thank you very much, I'm positive there isn't anywhere else where i could gain this useful insight.