Letra de Aion

Greek (Ancient)
Greek (Ancient)
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Aion

Aion ouk est etumos
Kale ansemi
Oud ebas en neusin euselmois
Logos outos
Aion
Oud ikeo pergama troias
Atela atela kale ansemi
Aion
Ok es eutos logos autos
Atela tela tela
Kale ansemi
Ok es eutos logos outos
 
¡Gracias!
1 agradecimiento
Publicado por Alberto ScottiAlberto Scotti el Vie, 02/07/2021 - 12:36

 

Las traducciónes de "Aion"
Stefano Saletti e Piccola Banda Ikona: 3 más populares
Comentarios
MickGMickG    Dom, 01/08/2021 - 21:10

Current lyrics:

Aion ouk est etumos
Kale ansemi
Oud ebas en neusin euselmois
Logos outos
Aion
Oud ikeo pergama troias
Atela atela kale ansemi
Aion
Ok es eutos logos autos
Atela tela tela
Kale ansemi
Ok es eutos logos outos

What I hear:

Aion alkotatoi
Gale ansemi
Aion atela sikur
Use arkuse
Ouk est' e[o]utos
Logos outos

Aion alkotatoi
Gale ansemi
Aion atela sikur
Use arkuse
Ouk est' e[o]utos
Logos outos

Atela atela atela
Gale ansemi
Arkuse ansemi sukre
Tisi agala
Ouk est' e[o]utos
Logos outos

Aion alkotatoi
Gale ansemi
Aion atela sikur
Use arkuse
Ouk est' e[o]utos
Logos outos

Atela atela atela
Gale ansemi
Arkuse ansemi sukre
Tisi agala
Ouk est' e[o]utos
Logos outos

Allasbaaaaa(?)

[More random sounds]

It's not in Greek letters, but at least it matches the video.

The site http://www.stefanosaletti.it/schede/starimost.htm says "Freely inspired by Aristophanes' The Wasps", but then the influence of this Stesichorus quote found in Plato is more than evident:

“οὐκ ἔστ᾽ ἔτυμος λόγος οὗτος,
οὐδ᾽ ἔβας ἐν νηυσὶν εὐσέλμοις,

And of course «οὐδ᾽ ἵκεο Πέργαμα Τροίας:», found right after the above quote, is present in the site's fake text. So is it inspired by the Wasps or by the Phaedrus? And how the frick do you write it in Greek words? And why does this band shit out super-corrupted Greek mashups, give out fake lyrics, and make up translations for them?

MickGMickG    Lun, 02/08/2021 - 17:09

Apart from the final "Allasbaaaa", which I feel safe enough assuming to be scat, we have two sections:

----1----

Aion alkotatoi
Gale ansemi
Aion atela sikur
Use arkuse
Ouk est' e[o]utos
Logos outos

----2----

Atela atela atela
Gale ansemi
Arkuse ansemi sukre
Tisi agala
Ouk est' e[o]utos
Logos outos

These are repeated in the scheme 1 1 2 1 2. They may be partially Greek-ified as follows.

1:

Αἰών, ἀλκ[ιμ]ώτατοι,
Καλὴ ἄν σ' ἠμί, (not sure about this)
Αἰών, atela sikur
Use arkuse
Οὔκ ἐστ' ἐοῦτος (perhasp Οὔκ ἐστι οὗτος/οὕτως)
Λόγος οὗτος

2:

Atela atela atela
Καλὴ ἄν σ' ἠμί, (not sure about this)
Arkuse, ansemi sukre (ἄν σ' ἠμί, σ' οὐ χρὴ ?)
Tisi agala (Τίσι ἄκαλα ?)
Οὔκ ἐστ' ἐοῦτος (perhaps Οὔκ ἐστι οὗτος/οὕτως)
Λόγος οὗτος

Doesn't seem to make much sense, and I can't Greek-ify any further.

Perhaps Οὔκ ἐστε οὕτως· / Λόγος οὗτος! «You are not thus: this is a fable!».

The Italian translation seems vaguely inspired by a chorus of The Wasps.

MickGMickG    Mié, 22/09/2021 - 22:26

Further Greek-ification and partial translation.

1:

Αἰών, ἀλκ[ιμ]ώτατοί (ἐσμεν), | Time, (we are) the bravest,
Καλή, ἄν σ' ἠμί… | Oh beauty, if I tell you…
Αἰών, atela sikur | Time, ??
Οὔση ἀρχούση… | O thou who art leadress…
«Οὔκ ἐστε οὕτως· | «Ye are not thus:
Λόγος οὗτος!». | This is a fable!».

2:

Atela atela atela | ??
Καλή, ἄν σ' ἠμί, | Oh beauty, if I tell you,
Ἀρχούση, ἄν σ' ἠμί, σ' οὐ χρή | O leadress, if I tell you, you don't need
Τισι ἄκαλα (-ειν)… | (To ??) calm things with some people…
«Οὔκ ἐστε οὕτως· | «Ye are not thus:
Λόγος οὗτος!». | This is a fable!».

So we're left with a semi-nonsensical text with two mystery words. "Atela" could be either "purposeless" / "endless", from privative alpha + τέλος, or the name of this beautiful leadress. Sikur is a complete mystery. It's something in Albanian, but this is Ancient Greek. And we still have to choose a verb to imply in l. 4 of part 2. The lines in quotes are supposed to be spoken by the leadress to the "we" of part 1, and "logos" as "fable" is based on a translation that comes from Οὔκ ἐστ' ἔτυμος λόγος αὐτός "This account (logos) is no fable (etymos)", maybe we should take it to mean "This is the (true) account", and the account is clipped out of this, except both the "You are not thus" and this account would have to come before, so it would be confusing. Actually, "atela" could be ἄθελα, a fake-Ancient Greek word meaning "unintentional". But what is unintentional? And also, what is time doing in here? How does aiōn, the song title, tie into the song at all?

MickGMickG    Mié, 22/09/2021 - 22:30

After a long series of steps, I have come to the below.

1:

Αἰῶν’ ἀλκ[ιμ]ώτατοί (ἐσμεν)! | (We’re) the bravest for (this) time,
Καλή, ἄν σ' ἠμί (οὕτως ἀληθινόν ἐστι)! | Oh beauty, if I tell you (thus it is true)!
Αἰῶν’ ἀτελ’, ἆ! Σ’ ἰκοῦ | For endless time, ah (we’re the bravest)! Come thou
Ῥύσῃ, ἀρχούση! | To salvation, oh leadress!
«Οὔκ ἐστε οὕτως· | «Ye are not thus:
Λόγος οὗτος (ἀπατή)!». | This account (is deception)!».

2:

Ἀτελ’, ἆ, ἀτελ’ ἀτελ’, ἆ! | Forever, ah, forever forever, ah!
Καλή, ἄν σ' ἠμί, | Oh beauty, if I tell you,
Ἀρχούση, ἄν σ' ἠμί, σ' οὐ χρή | O leadress, if I tell you, you don't need
Τισι ἄκαλα (κλονεῖν)! | (To agitate) calm things with some people!
«Οὔκ ἐστε οὕτως· | «Ye are not thus:
Λόγος οὗτος (ἀπατή)!». | This account (is deception)!».

So in both stanzas these guys are boasting about their qualities and the lady is calling bullshit on them. So the title should be Αἰῶν', or unelided Αἰῶνα.

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