"Con tarjeta marcada"

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<a href="/fr/translator/cph1776" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1467452">cph1776</a>
Inscrit·e le : 21.08.2020
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Hello, I'm translating Ilan Chester's "Palabras del Alma" into English: https://lyricstranslate.com/en/palabras-del-alma-words-spirit.html

The song has the following lines:
"Dime que sí para vivir junto a ti / A tiempo entero y con tarjeta marcada"

I *think* "tarjeta marcada" means a greeting or calling card, most likely with a romantic message on it.
(The other meaning would be playing cards with hidden symbols on them, used for cheating. Doesn't seem appropriate)

Or it could be an idiom of some sort, not to be translated literally.

What are your thoughts? Thanks!

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<a href="/fr/translator/missatomiclau" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1472762">MissAtomicLau</a>
Inscrit·e le : 08.10.2020

Hi CPH,
I don't know about the meaning in Spain but in most countries of Latin America "marcar tarjeta" refers to a guy calling or visiting a girl. It's an action that lets her know they're dating exclusively. Therefore, "tarjeta marcada" means that he has already done all this frequently.

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<a href="/fr/translator/balkant%C3%BCrk" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1439077">Balkantürk</a>
Inscrit·e le : 21.11.2019

As far as I remember it could mean when you give an explanation to somebody about something (Rendir cuentas) also a "tarjeta marcada" is a romantic letter with colored flowers, heart, romantic sentences or birthday letters... https://www.etsy.com/es/market/tarjetas_marcadas you can see it here. Also, I found, but that's not the case, https://www.prucommercialre.com/que-significa-para-marcar-tarjeta/#:~:te.... Also in Spain we said it when you arrive at the office and you clock your work tarjet in the machine work (fichar en el trabajo) but this one I think it's not in that case

<a href="/fr/translator/drigor" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1465978">Dr_Igor</a>
Inscrit·e le : 08.08.2020

What an interesting forum. I mean talk about languages. Why didn't I know about it before? Hi Tosya, Hi Dora.
Off-topic: What does CPH stand for? I know CHP and it is not a good thing when you are speeding on a California highway as I often do.
Another Off-topic: You were not born in 1776, right? We are of about the same LT age - I also joined in August of last year.
Off-topic #3: How come you studied Arabic, Vietnamese, Japanese, but never Russian?
I'll spare you my other off-topics

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<a href="/fr/translator/cph1776" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1467452">cph1776</a>
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>"tarjeta marcada" is a romantic letter with colored flowers, heart, romantic sentences or birthday letters.
That's most likely what the singer meant, and could be translated as "fancy love letter."

>Also in Spain we said it when you arrive at the officeand you clock your work tarjet in the machine work
We have those here in the US, we call them "time clocks." (I don't know what they're called in the UK). Nowadays most are
computerized, you sign in with your employee #, or perhaps a fingerprint or even eye scan, no cards involved

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<a href="/fr/translator/cph1776" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1467452">cph1776</a>
Inscrit·e le : 21.08.2020

1,2 :cph1776 = my initials + 1776, year of the founding of the United States
3: Arabic: I mostly studied how the writing system works, but haven't got into the grammar that much yet. Perhaps in a year or so I'll be able to translate some simple lyrics into Arabic
Vietnamese: mostly due to high school and college classmates speaking the language.
Japanese: we did a unit on Japan in social studies class in high school, and I became interested in the language. Then the movie "Shogun" came on TV, and everyone was interested in Japan
Russian: while I know Cyrillic, I need to study the grammar a bit more.

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<a href="/fr/translator/balkant%C3%BCrk" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1439077">Balkantürk</a>
Inscrit·e le : 21.11.2019

Exactly, in that case it's a romantic letter for sure

<a href="/fr/translator/drigor" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1465978">Dr_Igor</a>
Inscrit·e le : 08.08.2020

Hey CPH, thanks for responding. I was a little worried that I would come across as too "provocative"
My off-topics were mostly tongue-in-cheek, except maybe the question about Russian. I think knowing it would be so rewarding culturally
for anybody. Just ask Tosya. She is doing pretty, pretty well. But to master it is a tall order, especially for an English speaker, partially because of all the gendered verbs and adjectives. The fact that English does not have it is one of the reasons that English speakers (immigrants from the US, the UK and Australia, like my former landlord) are doing so much worse in learning Hebrew in Israel than Russian speakers.
Anyway, if you ever need help with Russian... Tosya can confirm that I'm qualified.

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<a href="/fr/translator/blackryder" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1429942">BlackRyder</a>
Inscrit·e le : 07.08.2019

Hello everyone! Just saw this in the forum notifications. I actually think Dora's last suggestion about clocking in at work is the one meaning that fits for me in the case of the lines and context provided. As in Spain, "marcar tarjeta" is used in some parts of Mexico with that meaning, and in my interpretation of the lines, the narrator is telling his loved one that he wants to live with him/her full time, checking in on her all the time as well, dedicating himself to her as he would do with his job. Something like, 'clocking in at all times for you'.

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<a href="/fr/translator/cph1776" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1467452">cph1776</a>
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Interesting. I might put words to that effect in a foot note