El tren (अंग्रेज़ी में अनुवाद)

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अंग्रेज़ी में अनुवादअंग्रेज़ी
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The train

You remained a substitute,
you don't give a step forward,
today you won't play
days go by always,
nothing seems urgent
in this walking routine.
 
Maybe only if you fall, you'll think about going up
and you see you must take a chance and risk living.
 
There, the waves of the sea keep
dancing in their place,
carried away by the wind.
Laugh until you cry,
dare to fly looking for the sky,
because the train goes on,
and won't come back.
 
Because the train goes on, on, on.
 
The fire you missed,
the kiss you didn't give
that will chase you,
the quite tears,
will come back dressed up
let's let them talk.
 
You see, one way you have to choose,
maybe there are another thousand ways to live.
 
There, the waves of the sea keep
dancing in their place,
carried away by the wind.
Laugh until you cry,
dare to fly looking for the sky
because the train goes on,
and won't come back.
Because the train goes on, on, on.
 
Come, don't feel alone that I'm here
come, you'll travel with me whatever I go.
 
There, the waves of the sea keep
dancing in their place,
carried away by the wind.
Laugh until you cry,
dare to fly looking for the sky
because the train goes on,
and won't come back.
Because the train goes on, on, on.
 
Just learning.
Poni de CthulhuPoni de Cthulhu द्वारा रवि, 07/01/2018 - 22:59 को जमा किया गया
Zarina01Zarina01 के अनुरोध के जवाब में जोड़ा गया
स्पैनिशस्पैनिश

El tren

"El tren" के अन्य अनुवाद
अंग्रेज़ी Poni de Cthulhu
Luis Fonsi: टॉप 3
कमेन्ट
MercurioHirviendoMercurioHirviendo    मंगल, 02/10/2018 - 02:58

The line "Porque el tren se va, y no volverá" is one of the most important lines in the song in my opinion (and the source of the song title), but in this case I strongly suspect "irse" would refer to the train leaving, which is almost the opposite of the current translation, which is "the train goes on". I would probably translate it like this:

Because the train is leaving, and it won't come back

The song mentions some things (metaphors) that keep going and continue. Right in the first stanza: "Los días pasan siempre, nada parece urgente, en la rutina de andar." This mentions days, that always come and go on schedule, and "la rutina de andar", which is both a "routine" (which indicates continuousness) and the verb "andar" has strong connotations of continuing, as well as the literal translation of "to walk". "La mujer anda comiendo su comida" would indicate that the woman just kept on eating her food, she didn't stop. She either continued or she was in the process of eating at the time of something else being talked about.

In contrast, "el tren se va, y no volverá" sounds like something that happens once and now the train won't come back. Most of the things in this song are at best metaphors, so it may be impossible to really tease it apart.

"Irse" can even be a euphemism for dying, which is the ultimate lack of continuing. I would compare "mi abuelo se fue" (my grandfather died) to the English euphemism "to pass away", because they both can be intransitive verbs of movement, but there is a marked lack of a destination. My grandfather passed away, he did not pass "this way" or "me in the hall", he is "gone now" because he passed away. This is similar to "irse", which often doesn't have a destination (it's just not here), and which definitely has no destination when used as a euphemism for death. But of course, you can also "pass through a specific place" in English or "irse hacia un lugar" in Spanish, especially in the imperative: "Vámonos a la playa." Or course, "to pass" when used with a place is usually "ir por", rather than being "ir a" or "ir para", which would indicate a destination and not a waypoint. The different role of the places is denoted by prepositions in Spanish but verb choice in English.

I feel like this song is about some things that continue forever (the days), some things that are done and will never change (the kiss you didn't give), and some things that do change or should change ("el tren se va y no volverá" - a metaphor; and "no te sientas sola que aquí estoy" - this should change, because perhaps the singer only arrived recently). In fact, the reason given for the commands in imperative is "porque el tren se va". I think this song is about letting go and relaxing, so it is probably good advice at all times, but the train is a metaphor, and I think this metaphorical train is leaving, it will not keep going. In fact, it won't come back. The metaphorical train is leaving forever, so you'd better just laugh and be okay with life. (And have the courage to fly, and all the verbs given in the imperative.)

MercurioHirviendoMercurioHirviendo    मंगल, 02/10/2018 - 03:06

Tiny Typo:

The English translation says "the quite tears" (sic), it should be "the quiet tears", this is a classic spelling error for both native and non-native English speakers. "Quiet" just seems like too many vowels in a row, and "quite" won't get a red underline, so why not? Because English.

I might also translate it differently, because of the following instruction "hay que dejarlas hablar" with "dejar" clearly referring to the tears as the direct object. I might translate it as "the tears you kept silent". Both translations are clearly correct, but in light of the later instruction to let the tears speak, I think these specific tears had been "kept silent" or "shut up" depending on which shade of meaning you want for "callar". Either way, they aren't "quite" tears.