Isabel Pantoja - En tu capote de seda (अंग्रेज़ी में अनुवाद)

प्रूफरीडिंग का अनुरोध किया
अंग्रेज़ी में अनुवाद

In your silk cloak

1.
In your silk cloak,
Hope, hope
Hope I want to be
- -
Hope I want to be
Always seeking your glory
Caught by my love
Always seeking your glory
Caught by my love
 
I discovered your affection
one happy early morning
in your arena of love
in your arena of love
and in my dressed up bullring
 
2.
In your pretty banderillas
My loves, my loves
You carry my loves.
- -
Carry my loves
So that the bullring knows it
And the blue sky understands it
So that the bullring knows it
And the blue sky understands it.
 
I discovered your affection
one happy early morning
in your arena of love
in your arena of love
and in my dressed up bullring
 
3.
In your matador's muleta1
My promises, My promises
My promises always go
- -
My promises always go
When the veritable bull
Sets out for the arena
When the veritable bull
Sets out for the arena
 
I discovered your affection
one happy early morning
in your arena of love
in your arena of love
and in my dressed up bullring
 
4.
On the point of your sword
My sorrows2, my sorrows
To wound my sorrows
- -
To wound my sorrows
and those bulls of jealousy
of pain and of suffering
and those bulls of jealousy
of pain and of suffering
 
I discovered your affection
one happy early morning
in your arena of love
in your arena of love
and in my dressed up bullring
 
  • 1. stick with red cloth attached
  • 2. duquelas is a word from flamenco jargon (caló) which isn't in any Spanish dictionary I have access to; but it means some sort of blend or combination of "concerns", "sorrows", "worries", "bits of mental fatigue", "preoccupations", and "stuff one can't get out of on's mind". The only definition I ever saw said that it was impossible to express in a single Spanish word; I can't think how to do it in English either
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michealt द्वारा शुक्र, 16/03/2018 - 09:24 को जमा किया गया
Valeriu Raut के अनुरोध के जवाब में जोड़ा गया
आख़िरी बार बुध, 21/03/2018 - 02:53 को michealt द्वारा संपादित
लेखक के कमेन्ट:

I suspect that the "bull" here is a metaphor for "duquelas" and matador is the one who soothes those pains/problems. So a girl has concerns about jealousy and pain and suffering (those concerns are the duquelas, called in the song "bulls of jealousy etc) courting a matador who will solve her problems with the whole thing tied in with bull-fighting. But that's just guesswork and may well be wrong.

The author of translation requested proofreading.
It means that he/she will be happy to receive corrections, suggestions etc about the translation.
If you are proficient in both languages of the language pair, you are welcome to leave your comments.
स्पैनिश

En tu capote de seda

See also
कमेन्ट
Valeriu Raut    शुक्र, 16/03/2018 - 14:04

Thank you Tom.

Wikipedia about Bullfighting, in English:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullfighting

capote > cape

Duquelas: preocupaciones. Son mis problemas, mis fatiguitas, mis dolores, esos eternos habitantes de mi mente que me impiden estar bien y nunca me dejan descansar. Duquelas es una expresión que tiene mucha riqueza, es sentimiento hondo muy difícil de encerrar en una sola palabra que lo resuma.

michealt    शनि, 17/03/2018 - 13:49

I think that was the definition I saw before. I don't know much about bull-fighting, as it is illegal in this part of Spain (the Canarias CA).

It's interesting that the Spanish Supreme court (perhaps influenced by the views of certain politicians on Catalonia) chose to rule that the Catalonia CA's ban on bull-fighting was invalid under the Spanish constitution although the Canarias CA and individual Ayuntamientos in the Galica CA and the Baleares CA can ban it without any complaint about breaching anything in the constitution. Also interesting that the parts of the Baleares CA that haven't banned it are the parts where it has never been practiced.

roster 31    रवि, 18/03/2018 - 19:05

Hi Tom!
Nice translation, in spite of the language difficulties.
Vale has already told you about the 'duquetas', but rhere are a couple more things that I want to mention:
1.A matter of grammar - The line "Tu cariño me encontré" you translated "Your affection met me". It makes sense, but, the original says "I found/met your affection". Have in mind that "me" is never subject in Spanish, but object, direct or indirect complement: me, to me.
2. Language - Do you call, in English "square" to the 'plaza de toros'? I thought it was 'the bullring' because, actually, ir isn't 'square' but 'round'.
3. Your notes - 'My promises always go" sounds perfectly fine to me : 'Wherever you may go, they go, attached to it'.
Typo in your note 3 - 'paló' --> 'caló'.

In regards to your interpretation, I don't know. It is your prerogative. I only know that she is addressing to a bullfighter.

Enjoy the day

michealt    रवि, 18/03/2018 - 20:28

Hi Rosa,
I don't think any single English word will work for "duquetas" without an explanatory footnote, except in cases where the context makes it obvious what sort of thing is intended. So I'm leaving that as it was, except that that "p" in the footnote has to be a "c".
I'm annoyed with myself for mistaking "me encontré" for something diferent (pehaps "se me encontó") or perhaps for forgetting the meaning of encontrarse. I don't know why I got that wrong. Thanks for pointing it out.
She sings of his "ruedo of love" and her "dressed up plaza" and it seemed odd to use the same word for both "ruedo" and "plaza"; but "square" is just plain wrong, and I don't think using "plaza" in English would work because it means one of "shopping centre" (centro comercial), market place (plaza del mercado), or "square". So I guess it has to be "bullring" for both as that's clearly what "ruedo" is.
My translator's comment interpretation may well be wrong, as I said it's guesswork; I've added a little more explanation to it to try to make it clearer.

roster 31    सोम, 19/03/2018 - 13:35

Don't be annoyed for one mistake. I, myself, still have problems with English prepositions. Just have in mind that the ending of the verbal form tells you who is doing the action.

What do you think if, to avoid repetition, in the refrain you say "ring" (ruedo) the first two times, and "bullring" the third one?

michealt    सोम, 19/03/2018 - 20:53

Actually, I've been trying to think of English words: one to cover the ring and bull-pens and stables (plus dressing rooms and offices and so on for matadors and assistants and staff) and the other to cover that the ring plus the area that holds the audience/spectators. I seem to recall knowing different words (or phrases perhaps) for space used by performers and staff and for space for the customers in several languages, but can't remember them in any language or even be sure which languages I knew them in (that's one of the problems with getting old).

Maybe I could use "ring" (for ruedo) and "bullring" (for plaza) as you suggest, but would "arena" (for "ruedo") and "bullring" work? I think that would sound better in English, and the difference is clearer in English - there would be no risk of someone thinking something like: "ring? what ring? oh, the bullring! why not say bullring?". "Arena" is used in the song, but I think in a way that would not clash with using it for "ruedo".

roster 31    मंगल, 20/03/2018 - 13:23

The 'Real Academia' translates "plaza (de toros)" as "bullring. "Ring" alone, is "el ruedo". It can be called "la arena" because the ground is 'sand' but, in this context, I think it will be more adequate to say "your ring of love" than "your sand of love".

You can always add a foot note.

Best to you

michealt    मंगल, 20/03/2018 - 13:43

But I wouldn't use the word "sand", but the word "arena" - which in English has come to mean "place for competition or conflict or spectacluar display to take place" and can no longer (since about 1400 AD) mean "sand" although it was clearly taken directly from Latin.