La Malinche (अंग्रेज़ी में अनुवाद)

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अंग्रेज़ी में अनुवादअंग्रेज़ी
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La Malinche

Madam, I am jealous
of this wind who nimbly
caresses your cheek
 
of Andalusian and
Pan-American provinces.
This pleasant wind is so soft
 
Madam, I am jealous,
madam, I am jealous
of this wind who caresses your cheek !
In these Andalusian provinces
it just settles on your mahogany skin
 
When I stay in Paris ...
 
Oh yes
Oh yes
Oh yes !
 
At every letter, I would admit it,
I fear to cause you trouble.
And this expectation like a missile
gives pain to my raw head.
 
Let the day pass twice
and let the night come,
the day passes twice
and let the night come !
...
 
Yeah, let the night come,
let you return to me on the other bank !
Are you with someone else ?
 
The things run away from us,
why hold them
by the end of the scarf ?
So fast we become
strange, strangers to each other.
At the neck the memory strangles ...
 
And I stay in Paris
 
Oh yes
Oh yes
Oh yes !
 
You, native of the lands
where Cortés came
to find hatred and fortune,
you know by old memory
to watch out for the braves,
and for their inpatient thirst !
 
How many cowards came here
chasing chimeras with their rifles ?
Drunk with glory, they thought your heart
would be conquered, pierced with arrows and rancor,
like your Mexican Coasts !
 
Like Malinche, Malinche,
there will be no one.
 
Oh yes
Oh yes
Oh yes !
 
Valeriu RautValeriu Raut द्वारा रवि, 12/10/2014 - 20:06 को जमा किया गया
nykti-eoikuianykti-eoikuia के अनुरोध के जवाब में जोड़ा गया
आख़िरी बार बुध, 05/11/2014 - 08:03 को Valeriu RautValeriu Raut द्वारा संपादित
फ्रेंचफ्रेंच

La Malinche

"La Malinche" के अन्य अनुवाद
अंग्रेज़ी Valeriu Raut
कृपया "La Malinche" का अनुवाद करने में सहायता करें
Feu! Chatterton: टॉप 3
कमेन्ट
nykti-eoikuianykti-eoikuia    रवि, 12/10/2014 - 22:39

Now I see: Paname is a nickname of Paris from/of the beginning of 20th century, not Panama, thank you.
It could be that "grège" doesn't mean raw. Grège is "raw" for silk, right, à la "of raw silk", i think (although there might be some silk connotation) but it is also a colour that is called oatmeal in English (a light greyish brown colour, like that of oatmeal). Maybe that is meant.

There are some questions I need to ask to get a better understanding. I might want to retranslate it.
1) verses 1 and 2: "I envy the caressing wind; Andalusian and Panamerican provinces" is the meaning, right? (Could he directly be jealous of winds of these provinces?) Oh, that comes in the next verse. Could it come before that too?

2) "Que deux fois passe le jour
Et vienne la nuit
Passe le jour
Et vienne la nuit!" Seems a bit problematic, right? Could you translate it as "Let the day pass and night come"? Right now this English seems weird to me. Or can it be somehow linked with the previous verse like, "makes my head ache so that the day passes twice". Are there places in this song that can have really different readings and alternative interpretations?

3) "Native des contrées" could it be vocative, addressee of this sentence?

4) Maybe it's important to note that beside being a really hideous monster, chimère means "impossible dream" to French, I think. To me that link isn't obvious. "Courir après des chimères" can be conveniently translated as "chasing rainbows / castles in the air". Well, there is no "après" in this song, does it make anything different?

5) Insignificant ones:
Les choses nous échappent (We don't notice them? They run away from us? The second?)
Par le bout de l'écharpe (Is it a very significant scarf? Could it be a piece, shred of that scarf?)
Si vite devenir (the verb is about those two "lovers", right? What makes it to be infinitive there, not some finite form of the verb?)
de leur soif inopportune! ("de" there means "because" right? "to watch out because" or "brave because " or it doesn't matter?)
De Malinche, de Malinche; Of Malinche, Malinche (I don't get this part. [someone][such as] Malinche? [Someone] of M['s kind]?)

Anyway, big warm thank-yous!

PS. A chaque missive & At every letter; "in every (long/official) letter" or "beside each object that is my letter", "with/through every letter"?

Valeriu RautValeriu Raut    बुध, 15/10/2014 - 07:51

Hello Anni,
I remember it was late at night when I have done this translation.
Thank you for your in-depth analysis and for the appreciation you give me - it is mutual.
I understand that "grège" means here "row". For you - it means a colour.

1) Could he directly be jealous of winds of these provinces?
Yes, he considers that the wind is a person. (poetically)

2) Que deux fois passe le jour
Et vienne la nuit
Seems a bit problematic, right?
Of course, the night cannot come only after two days.
The poet is playing with us.
I have not an explanation of what does he mean with this metaphor.

3) "Native des contrées" could it be vocative, addressee of this sentence?
Yes, it is vocative. I have changed it with: You, native of the lands

4) About “chimère”.
You are right; the word could mean “impossible dream”. But not here.
The Spaniards came to The New Word as warriors, not as discoverers.
They thought they had to fight against enemies, to win battles and to conquer lands.
But the inhabitants were not warriors.
With their rifles, the Spaniards were chasing illusion monsters, chimeras.

5) I will consider your points, and I will correct my translation accordingly.
I have corrected : The things run away from us
And :
Like Malinche, Malinche,
there will be no one.

Generally speaking, an artist wants to be controversial, even provocative.
Every reader understands the poem in his own way.
Sometimes the artists want to be hermetic; the message should be a mystery, or something to be interpreted and cause debate, like this one of ours.
A teacher would have explained the following words : Malinche, Paname and Cortés.

Best regards.
Please receive my friendly salute from Stockholm.

And feel free to retranslate the song.

nykti-eoikuianykti-eoikuia    गुरु, 23/10/2014 - 20:14

Thank you a lot!
I would like to clarify some things.

"2) Que deux fois passe le jour
Et vienne la nuit
Seems a bit problematic, right?
Of course, the night cannot come only after two days.
The poet is playing with us.
I have not an explanation of what does he mean with this metaphor."

I didn't mean its metaphoric part, I was interested in its links to relations to lines, verses it's surrounded by (and that verbs around there seem to be readable both as indicative and conjunctive).
About what is meant, he wishes to live each/this day twice. More time to think things through? (I would personally change word order around there and add some words if you of course trust my understanding of English grammar.)

"4) About “chimère”.
You are right; the word could mean “impossible dream”. But not here.
The Spaniards came to The New Word as warriors, not as discoverers.
They thought they had to fight against enemies, to win battles and to conquer lands.
But the inhabitants were not warriors.
With their rifles, the Spaniards were chasing illusion monsters, chimeras."
I would disagree. Aztecs had the considerable military power in the area, tribute was paid to them, they are even called an empire which Cortés conquered (I'm reading Wiki) before Spaniards got the hegemony. According to my understanding, such ventures attract fortune hunters, getting rich or glory is also a kind of dream. Sometimes they have nothing better to do (at home). (And something about the word "rifle" sounds really unprofessional to me. Well, as far as I remember, there was no iron in America.)

What do you think?

Best of time to you in Stockholm!

Valeriu RautValeriu Raut    सोम, 03/11/2014 - 06:39

Hello Anni,

Let the day pass twice
and let come the night,
the day passes twice
and let come the night !

You would like to change the word order of these verses and I am ready to do it: please write how.

Columbus was my hero when I was a teenager, until I read his memoirs.
He was more of a conqueror than a discoverer.
I listen to you and I change the word RIFFLE with GUN.

You are from Estonia.
By the way, the ferry terminal in Tallinn was designed by our company SIAB. I was on the team.
A few years after, I have travelled to Tallinn (by boat), to visit the city.
The terminal is too big and not beautiful, only functional. It will serve well in the future, when the traffic will increase.

Best wishes.

nykti-eoikuianykti-eoikuia    सोम, 03/11/2014 - 12:31

Hello again!
I hope your job is interesting then. I hope that I misunderstood that you found the result of your work disappointing. I don't know... I haven't spent very much time there. What I remember that sucked was actually finding the right building. Our airport is quite pretty though.

and let come the night --> let the night come
When I said that "rifle" sounds unprofessional then I meant that about the ones who were holding them. I wanted to illustrate some point, didn't mean you to change it. "Rifle" could be historically correct. Don't trust me.
I think that it is quite usual to write your defeated enemy as more dreadful than it was. In addition, I found out that Aztecs used to bury their newborns' umbilical chord under a kitchen (girls) or a battlefield (boys). It might mean something.

All the best!
A

nykti-eoikuianykti-eoikuia    शुक्र, 21/11/2014 - 22:26

Yes, i introduced the subject of airport too quickly, without much introduction. Sorry.

nykti-eoikuianykti-eoikuia    शुक्र, 14/10/2016 - 18:52

Thank you for giving this close view to the lyrics and its meaning. Teeth smile It was very-very interesting to read.

When you mentioned that interrogation lost in translation it made me think that, as these are the official lyrics provided on Youtube by the band, maybe someone should point out the lost question mark. (And here too.) Right? Have I understood correctly.

nykti-eoikuianykti-eoikuia    मंगल, 25/10/2016 - 12:17

Regular smile
Thank you!

Yes, it would be interesting. I'd like to hear of it too.

TCt83067695 .TCt83067695 .    शनि, 06/01/2018 - 00:29

Love the interactions as much as the translation.
Thank you everyone for imparting knowledge ☺