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Unknown language

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015
Pending moderation

Hi, can anybody tell me what they are singing in this song?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4U3aE-vQkPA

At 1:25

It's two lines mixed with Italian:

Una torta di papavero per volare via.
??? ritorniamo a casa.
??? tutta la famiglia.

The first one sounds like German (späte späte ???).
The second one sounds like Arabic.
Anyway, I'm probably wrong.
The rest of the song features Slovenian and Croatian too, so it might also be some Slavic language.

Also, note that the lines are sung with a heavy Italian accent, whatever the original language was supposed to be.

Super Member
<a href="/hu/translator/karlus" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1282526">Karlus</a>
Csatlakozott: 13.03.2016

Maybe:
"Shpeit shpeite hayde, ritorniamo a casa
Uhda' embar, mirdita a tutta la famiglia"
But it's a mixture of different languages... can be everything!

Editor True-to-original translations.
<a href="/hu/translator/michaelna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1257575">MichaelNa</a>
Csatlakozott: 29.08.2015

Western Union, qui, chez Babylon,
got me money but really miss me home.
Western Union, qui, chez Babylon,
got me money but really miss me home.

Giorni che passano, I say dober dan.
Un sospiro rubato alla città.
Giorni che passano, I say dober dan.
Un sospiro lieve rubato alla città.

Positive thinking, nema problema.
Festa e pomeriggio sopra una panchina
si scaldano i racconti da un tè in compagnia.
Una torta di papavero per volare via
Shpejt të, shpejt të, eja të, ritorniamo a casa.
Uhda' e mbar, miredita a tutta la famiglia
Shpejt të, shpejt të, eja të, ritorniamo a casa.
Giorni che passano, qui, chez Babylon.

Western Union, come for me,
please take me home.
Mia suerte es nada
ma un giorno anch'io sarò regina.

Il sole sorge, I say dober dan.
La maison des fous is luna y soledad.
Il sole sorge, I say dober dan.
La maison des fous is luna y soledad.
L'odore di straniero ti resta sulla mano.
Occhi azzurri fuggono, sì... fuggono lontano.
I say dober dan.
Un sospiro rubato alla città.
Occhi azzurri fuggono, fuggono lontano.

Western Union, come for me,
please take me home.
Mia suerte es nada
ma un giorno anch'io sarò regina.

Western Union, come for me,
please take me home.
Mia suerte es nada
ma un giorno anch'io sarò regina.

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015
Karlus wrote:

Maybe:
"Shpeit shpeite hayde, ritorniamo a casa
Uhda' embar, mirdita a tutta la famiglia"
But it's a mixture of different languages... can be everything!

Do you have any idea about what it might mean?

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015

@michaelNa yes, those are the lyrics you can find on any site, but they're clearly wrong and nonsensical.

Super Member
<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

"Shpejt shpejte hajde" seems to mean something like "Quick, hurry up !" in Albanese. Couldn't find anything for "Uhda' embar" yet, probably misspelling.
P.S. Ah sorry, "Uhda' e mbar" seems to be "Stand up" or "Stay up".

Super Member
<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

And Mirditë is an Albanese district, but is it this meaning here, I have no idea.
And I found "dober dan" Regular smile Could have guessed it myself Angry smile
.
Kishë is probably a church (building).

Super Member
<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

Well no, I listened to the song again and they pronounce "kwishe", not "kishe". The "French" hypothesis ("qui chez Babylon") doesn't make any sense to me, and anyway it should be pronounced "kishe" too (but "la maison des fous" would sound approximatively right, whatever it means here). I'm afraid I'll have to give it up. Confused smile

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<a href="/hu/translator/annabellanna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1240490">annabellanna</a>
Csatlakozott: 27.03.2015

Dober dan is croatian "good morning", I guess...
and "mirdita" is the same in Albanian
and "udha e mbare" : "good travel"
(udhë të mbarë a dirla tutta...)

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<a href="/hu/translator/annabellanna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1240490">annabellanna</a>
Csatlakozott: 27.03.2015

Listening this song , I guess it could play with the assonance "qui(=ici),chez Babylon" e "kwishe Babylon!"(=Do destroy Babylon!) in xhosa laguage(South Africa).
The referring to rastafarian Babylon is stressed by the reggae rythm.
The text doesn't seem to be a nonsense.

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<a href="/hu/translator/annabellanna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1240490">annabellanna</a>
Csatlakozott: 27.03.2015

No, I'm wrong, I guess. Probably it's "kwisha Babylon", and(according GT)is Swahili and means "new Babylon"!  Regular smile

Super Member
<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

Mmmh. And "nema problema" is "No problem" in various Slavic languages. So we have : Italian + English + (Slovenian, Croatian, Bosnian and/or other former Yugoslavian languages) + Albanian + French + Spanish + probably Xhosa or Swahili. And I guess the text is about an Italian backpacker who had his money stolen in Yugoslavia or Albania and is expecting some through Western Union in order he could get back home... Mamma mia ! Regular smile
(Thanks to Anna, other opinions welcome...)

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<a href="/hu/translator/karlus" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1282526">Karlus</a>
Csatlakozott: 13.03.2016

Unfortunately not at all.
I think that it is deliberately a mixture of so many languages that you don't manage to find any kind of general meaning.

Super Member
<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

She insists much upon "Western Union" and "going back home", so I think that my theory might hold. The use of many Albanian and Yugoslavian words makes me think that she's travelling in that area, and the other languages (English, Spanish, French) would be quite normal for a backpacker to meet on his trip (when you're travelling, you often have to jump from one language to another). The African word, whatever it is, seems in accordance with "Babylon" and the reggae style, as Anna pointed it. The bets are on ! But I don't think neither that it is completely nonsensical, and anyway, the music is nice...

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015

Thanks a lot for your help, Jadis and Anna.
Albanian seems to make sense, though it's still uncertain.
Xhosa and Swahili: I don't know, it's just a single word, and the rest of the song is obscure, so I have no clear explanation to guide the interpretation of that line.

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015

The song could be about migrants, who use Western Union to send money back home.
For those who do not integrate in their new country - those who still "smell like strangers" - the western society is like Babylon, a city full both of riches and moral decay. They have more money here but long for their homelands, and wish they could go back some way. Meanwhile, they see their days "passing by", they have some moments of happiness - a tea with friends, maybe some opioid to "fly away" with their minds - and they still dream of some day getting a stroke of luck (to "become queen"), even though for the moment their fate (suerte) is not rosy.

Editor True-to-original translations.
<a href="/hu/translator/michaelna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1257575">MichaelNa</a>
Csatlakozott: 29.08.2015

I guess those words turned out to be not so "clearly wrong and nonsensical" after all. Regular smile

Here is how Italians in the same situation wrote about it. No Babylon mentioned. Regular smile
https://lyricstranslate.com/en/lacrime-napulitane-neapolitan-tears.html-1

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<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

It's possible, although I had understood she uses Western Union to get money from home, not to send some home ("Western Union come for me / Please take me home", etc.) In that case we might imagine Italian emigrants mixed up with Yugoslavian and Albanian (among others) in the States... I know that the Italian emigration to the US was strong, but I have no information about the Yugoslavian or Albanian one... True, the rest of your proposition makes sense.

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<a href="/hu/translator/annabellanna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1240490">annabellanna</a>
Csatlakozott: 27.03.2015

Maybe because I live in Italy, I agree with Stefano. It's quite probable, in my opinion, that this song is referred to immigrants in Europe. In French, Germany and Italy there are many immigrants from Yugoslavia, Albania, Africa and Latin America. The new Babylon allow them to live and send money home,but they suffer for homesickness and, when they gather to eat some typical food(like cakes with poppy-seeds), feel like they are at their own homes
.

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015

I think the singer is sort of calling out to Western Union because, sadly as it may be, it's the closest link she has to her native country (I mean the person in the song, not the singer as herself in real life).
Italian migration was strong, but I don't think it has to do with the song. Except that Italians who nowadays despise migrants (they steal our jobs etc. etc.) should remember that our ancestors were migrants too, and they were treated quite bad, so we should behave better towards today's migrants.
Of course, the Modena City Ramblers are ramblers, so they have many experiences to draw from, to talk about other cultures and people; however, they are travellers, not migrants, so I don't think the song is about Italian migrants.

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<a href="/hu/translator/annabellanna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1240490">annabellanna</a>
Csatlakozott: 27.03.2015

Did you notice that she says something like " maison des cous"? Or I am wrong?

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015

I clearly hear "fous" both in the album version and in this live version:
https://youtu.be/cJTcuu5Yc7c

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<a href="/hu/translator/ww-ww" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1294288">Ww Ww</a>
Csatlakozott: 03.06.2016

Shpejt të, shpejt të, eja të - Albanian

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<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

To me it's "La maison des fous" (House of Fools). There is a Russian movie called so (Konchalovksy : Дом дураков, although in French they decided it would be "La maison de fous", both being correct), and it's about war in Chechnya. This expression sounds very Russian : I believed I remembered it was the title of a Dostoievsky's book, but actually it was "The House of the Dead' ("Записки из Мёртвого дома"); The "Diary of a Madman" is a short story from Gogol. In the present song the word "fou" (a mad person) is associated with "moon" and "solitude", which soons quite... logical (and makes me think of King Crimson), and also probably with "Babylon" (chaos, etc.)

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<a href="/hu/translator/stefano8" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1259768">Stefano8</a>
Csatlakozott: 20.09.2015

Is it more correct than "shpejt shpejte hajde"?
The pronunciation is much more like "shpejt shpejte hajde", though of course it could be a mispronunciation.

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<a href="/hu/translator/ww-ww" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1294288">Ww Ww</a>
Csatlakozott: 03.06.2016

That is more (sort of) Croatian. It is possible.

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<a href="/hu/translator/jadis" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1387945">Jadis</a>
Csatlakozott: 01.07.2018

It's definitely Albanian, see here for example. Doesn't sound Slavic at all.

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<a href="/hu/translator/leloo" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1346641">leloo</a>
Csatlakozott: 25.07.2017

"dobar dan" means " good day" = hello in Croatia or Serbia
good morning = dobro jutro"

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