La petite Rose (英語 訳)

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英語 訳英語
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The little Rose

For little Rose
I had these roses sculptured,
those roses by the hands
of a humble Michael-Angelo
who creates for the angels
roses without scent.
 
For little Rose
the virtuoso's chisel
made, one by one,
strange pale coloured
petals which were laid out
in a precious case.
 
On Rose's roses
bit by bit the dew
of sorrow settles.
Nature in exchange
mixes into the tears
the morning dew.
 
Poor little thing
picked when hardly opened
by the fingers of fate
have you gained from the change,
are you with the angels,
or are you nothing at all any more?
 
For little Rose
I had these roses sculptured,
those roses by the hands
of a humble Michael-Angelo
who creates for the angels
roses without scent.
 
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土, 18/05/2019 - 18:32にmichealtmichealtさんによって投稿されました。
Valeriu RautValeriu Rautさんによるリクエスト
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La petite Rose

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michealtmichealt    日, 19/05/2019 - 11:16

Thans Vale. But out of 56 citations in the Oxford English Dictionary (3rd Edition) only 4 (of which 2 are American and 1 is Irish) omit the space. So most occurrences of English writing have "any more" rather than "anymore". If one gets more specific, to the case where it is used as an adverb in a negative, interrogative, or hypothetical context (as in the line in question) there are 16 citations of that use of which only 2 (including 1 American) omit the space - still pretty solid evidence that keeping the space is the norm. So the evidence is that keeping the space is very much the norm and especially so in the English of England, Wales and Scotland.