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Δv
Member - Cultural Enthusiast
<a href="/ko/translator/%CE%B4v" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1424092">Δv</a>
등록: 08.06.2019
Pending moderation

I have discovered that one song has two different versions, each with mostly the same verses. However, one of them omits some of them and adds new ones.
How would I go about adding that?

Editor True-to-original translations.
<a href="/ko/translator/michaelna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1257575">MichaelNa</a>
등록: 29.08.2015

Is it being sung by the same artist?

Δv
Member - Cultural Enthusiast
<a href="/ko/translator/%CE%B4v" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1424092">Δv</a>
등록: 08.06.2019

Yes

Editor True-to-original translations.
<a href="/ko/translator/michaelna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1257575">MichaelNa</a>
등록: 29.08.2015

Add the one with the complete lyrics and disregard the one where some of the lyrics are omitted. If still undecided, add the one recorded in a studio rather than a live version.

Editor
<a href="/ko/translator/michealt" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1222532">michealt</a>
등록: 11.10.2014

I think this is a case in which the LT rules make it impossible to do anything remotely right - both versions by this singer are incomplete, so MichaelNa's suggestion won't work.

I've thought about always providing complete lyrics (or as complete as I can get them) and adding a submitter's comment about some of them being omitted in some performances (and providing a video reference and stating which parts the singer sings this time for each version of the lyrics, including in the comment a statement of which partsof the lyrics are sug and which omitted). But I imagine some moderators throwing up their hands in horror and inventing a rule to say you can't do that, so up to now I haven't done it.

It's actually a big problem for long (more than a dozen stanzas) lyrics where performers will probably pick between 4 and 6 stanzas to sing and drop the rest - but pick a different set the next time round, particularly where songs are mainly picked up from the oral tradition (because the words get changedsometimes, not just omitted). That's the way most singers handle Scots Gaelic folk song (called "folk song" because the singer often feel free to do what they like to the lyrics if they think it will please their audience, even when the lyrics were written by oustanding poets, were published by reputable publishers, and are essential reading for university students studying gaelic literature for a bachelor's degree or for a research degree).

Editor True-to-original translations.
<a href="/ko/translator/michaelna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1257575">MichaelNa</a>
등록: 29.08.2015
michealt wrote:

It's actually a big problem for long (more than a dozen stanzas) lyrics where performers will probably pick between 4 and 6 stanzas to sing and drop the rest - but pick a different set the next time round, particularly where songs are mainly picked up from the oral tradition (because the words get changedsometimes, not just omitted). That's the way most singers handle Scots Gaelic folk song (called "folk song" because the singer often feel free to do what they like to the lyrics if they think it will please their audience, even when the lyrics were written by oustanding poets, were published by reputable publishers, and are essential reading for university students studying gaelic literature for a bachelor's degree or for a research degree).

That’s the reason I suggested to opt for recorded versions: there’s definitely more commitment there.

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