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Bras dessus bras dessous (Engels vertaling)

  • Artiest: Dalida (Iolanda Cristina Gigliotti‎)
  • Nummer: Bras dessus bras dessous
  • Vertalingen: Engels
Engels vertalingEngels (poëtisch)
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Arm in Arm

Happy as two sparrows on the same branch—
happy as lovers at a Sunday dance—
happy as two schoolboys on a day of vacation—
 
Every day that God makes, our joys begin anew
and when we are in love, our love smells good
like a sheet dried in winds of lavender—
tasty as fruit sampled in the winds of the harvest—
and as long as it lasts, that’s how long we will stroll
 
Your arm in my arm, on our bare arms—
your arm in my arm, cheek to cheek—
we could not ask for more.
 
Happy as two sparrows on the same branch—
happy as lovers at a Sunday dance—
happy as two schoolboys on a day of vacation—
 
Every day that God makes, our joys begin anew
and when we love each other, our love smells good
like a sheet dried in winds of lavender—
good as fruit crushed in the winds of the harvest.
When we reach one hundred years old, we will both feel like twenty
 
Your arm in my arm, aching all over—
your arm in my arm, cheek to cheek—
we could not ask for more.
 
Toegevoed door  Gast Gast op Do, 07/03/2019 - 01:29
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Bras dessus bras dessous

Meer vertalingen van Bras dessus bras ...
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Idioms from "Bras dessus bras ..."
Reacties
ingirumimusnocteingirumimusnocte    Do, 07/03/2019 - 02:35

Bras dessus bras dessous -> I suppose you kept it literal for the pun in the chorus? I wonder if that's explicit in English?

un fruit croqué -> more like "a bite off a fruit" ("croquer dans qq ch" is like "bite into smt."). "bon" would mean "tasty" or something like that.
The rest of the sentence hints at grapes, so it could be about eating a single grape.
I'm not quite sure what verb would fit best. "crunch" or "munch" sound pretty ungainly to me Regular smile

JLYJLY    Do, 07/03/2019 - 04:28

Well, I wondered if "brass dessus bras dessous" was an idiom or not--could not find any reference to it anywhere. I interpreted it as having to do with dancing entwined--arms on top being at a bit of a distance and arms underneath meaning in a clasped movement ("cheek to cheek"). But yes there are certainly puns and allusions going on in this song (many of Dalida's songs seem to have risque secondary meanings). I struggled with the fruit imagery--it does sound as if the intention was to suggest the smell of crushing grapes for wine. Will work on that ... merci bien!

ingirumimusnocteingirumimusnocte    Do, 07/03/2019 - 04:39

Well that's a rather common way of saying "arm in arm" or possibly "hand in hand", typically for two lovers walking side by side.
As a metaphor, it can evoke two people showing off their agreement, but that's not the case here.

The chorus is tricky to render anyway. Maybe using "hand" and "arm" once each could do the trick?
Or maybe "your arm... in my arm", if that makes sense in English?

JLYJLY    Do, 07/03/2019 - 04:47

So that really does complicate things throughout and it especially makes the chorus (or the pseudo-choruses since the repetition is not exact) very tricky. Tried to adjust it but don't know--but I did not think it was a good idea to get the hands involved (!!). (Wish I had left this one alone!)

ingirumimusnocteingirumimusnocte    Do, 07/03/2019 - 04:53

If you want to really get the gist of the French, it says "tant qu'on le promènera [...] sur nos bras nus". "le" refers to their love.
You rendered "promener" as "show off" but that's rather "take for a walk" here.

So that would be like having a cupid sit on/in their bare arms and enjoy the ride Teeth smile