Reclame

What is "back it out the county line" supposed to mean?

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whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019
Pending moderation

After a long and fruitless research despite [@flopsi]'s kind help, I turn to benevolent native speakers to pierce the mystery of these powerful words of wisdom:

I appreciate the way you watch me, I can't lie
I drop it down, I pick it up, I back it out the county line
I fell from heaven, now I'm living like a devil
You can't get me off your mind
I appreciate the way you want me, I can't lie
I drop it low, I back it up, I know you wanna think you're mine

I repeatedly prayed to the Google God, browsed quite a few UD entries and went sightseeing through all the song meaning resources I could think of.
I collected a lot of weird sexual code words and a few peculiar meanings to "county line", but was left none the wiser about the intended message. Not even what the "it" might stand for, if it stands for anything.

What struck me as odd is, nobody on the Internet ever seemed to wonder about these lines. As if backing whatever-thing(s)-you-can-back-out-the-county-line out the county line was such an obvious thing to do.

I'm bracing for the blinding flash of the obvious. Thanks in advance.

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/uncommon" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1414669">Schnurrbrat</a>
Lid geworden op: 07.03.2019

I believe it is a typo: I back it off the county line

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

Good! Now I just need to figure out what backing whatever-thing(s)-you-can-back-off-the-county-line off the county line is supposed to mean. Teeth smile

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Lid geworden op: 16.12.2017

42, не грузите
Back out - is some kind of verb (phrasal or intransitive, я дальше не лезу)

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/uncommon" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1414669">Schnurrbrat</a>
Lid geworden op: 07.03.2019

I would understand if it was "Back it off!" (without county line),
but so far (praise to mighty search engines) I have found this (on truckers lingo site):
Back it down - used to tell another driver to get his foot off the accelerator and reduce speed. "You got a construction zone up here, back it down." Also "back it off."

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

Mmm... So truckers might be involved? The plot thickens...

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.07.2018

No slang expertise, but back out off the country lane - simply means to drive in reverse to make a uturn

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/uncommon" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1414669">Schnurrbrat</a>
Lid geworden op: 07.03.2019

That's what I thought, like she is driving somewhere, but at the county line she is making a U-turn.

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

You mean "county line" would be a phonetic rendition of "country lane"?
I want to believe the audience would have resented being fed phonetic English and eventually someone would have voiced an opinion about it. Or has the power girls' fanbase reached a point where meaning does not even matter?

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Lid geworden op: 16.12.2017

Are there “real” English natives on this site?
Or they just don’t care?

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.07.2018

We can send them back to my fair lady.. Line.. Lane.. Isn't it what I just said? Lol
We should ping Rose - she was super helpful in the past

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/uncommon" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1414669">Schnurrbrat</a>
Lid geworden op: 07.03.2019

County line > a "border" between two counties, it is sometimes marked with a road sign.

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

I got to the point where I understand the basic meaning of each word. Still the complete sentence sounds as meaninful as "eking out a toaster" or "tweet it past a banana"

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.07.2018

Goodness, I read countRy not counTy. You got it.

Ironic Iron ֍ The Black Sun
<a href="/nl/translator/st-sol" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1315904">St. Sol</a>
Lid geworden op: 20.11.2016

I can assure you that county lines are quite real: whereas state troopers can chase you around the whole state, local cops always stop and turn around at the county lines. Regular smile

Editor , Leader of the Balkan Squad
<a href="/nl/translator/crimsondyname" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1311076">crimsonDyname</a>
Lid geworden op: 14.10.2016

I think I may have an answer. "Back it off the county line" probably means to shake/stick out one's butt so far that, if it were on the border of two counties, it would go across the county line.

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Lid geworden op: 16.12.2017

And where is [@Phil Ambro] hiding nowadays?

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

If I got you right, "it" is her ass, that she shakes in every conceivable way?
I feel my soul open up to poetry all of a sudden...

Editor , Leader of the Balkan Squad
<a href="/nl/translator/crimsondyname" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1311076">crimsonDyname</a>
Lid geworden op: 14.10.2016

Yes, "it" refers to the posterior  Tongue smile

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

Oh, the humanity...
That sure fits the general vulgarity of the song.
Still I cling to the hope the girl might mean something slightly less trivial.
I hope you won't mind if I wait for a few more opinions?

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/brat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334845">Brat</a>
Lid geworden op: 13.04.2017

I remember there was a movie about fucking at the crossing of county lines, cops starring too...

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Lid geworden op: 16.12.2017

Is Bro a little excited today или мне кажется?

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.07.2018

Bro? Look at Pierre with the support of 42...

silenced wrote:

If "it" is her ass, that she shakes in every conceivable way?
I feel my soul open up to poetry all of a sudden...

M, was it really soul?

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

First truckers, now cops. Where it will all end, I shudder to think.

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Lid geworden op: 16.12.2017

Д, ну у Пети душа открылась. Ну и ладно. А вы ещё про медведя не слышали?

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.10.2018

I've been ill lately, sorry. This site is a good pastime for me, so while I'm recovering, I'll try to add my two cents of wisdom here.

People from "The South" in the USA (the states that fought against "The Union" in the civil war) are considered "The Country". They make "Country Music" which really isn't all that popular anymore, except in those states (and areas with a majority of people who have moved from those states). Anyways, whenever I hear such a statement as "the country line", it generally means "passing out of towns into a city".

HOWEVER, this is NOT "COUNTRY" it's "COUNTY". Still that doesn't matter. Within city limits, county lines rarely matter, because it's hard to tell when crossing counties in populated areas. ONLY IN THE SOUTH (and sparsely populated rural areas) does it matter when you cross "county lines". Some counties allow you to buy alcohol, others don't, etc. The South is like that. In The South "County Laws vary greatly, so that was is legal in one county is illegal in another, and you can cross county lines within a city. The South is fucked up like that. So what this poem specifically means when "crossing the county line" can be many things. But ALL of them are in The South.

It can mean:
1: He crossed out of his county, where the sheriff (police) know him, into anther county where the sheriff hates him.
2: He crossed into a county that allows alcohol, where his does not.
3: He's leaving his county to go to someplace that is not stuck in the past, and is going to a modern city.
4: Something else that only someone who lives in the South could imagine, and I would never know.

This really isn't all that deep a poem in English anyway. I have to say that poetry in English isn't as popular as it is in Russia. But, to really be popular in English it has to be something rather catchy, and not so mundane as this drivel. Sorry. I still remember one line from a poem that I heard when I was a child. It was beautiful, yet shocking. A (black) slave was talking about her life and death. The last line of the poem before she died was "...and into the room imposed a fly." It was such a strikingly horrific way to die. Such things as these are needed to make an American take note of poetry. Some asshole who lives in a state who still can't get over the fact that they lost a war that happened over 100 years ago, is NOT poetry, just some disgruntled (normally racist) asshole from some bumfuck* "County in The South".

So frankly, I don't care about this so-called "poem". It's shit anyway. IMHO.

* "bumfuck" = A Southern "Country" term for "stupid", but people from the city (like me) take it literally a "fucked up the ass" or "really fucked up", which is wrong by "Southern" slang, but that's exactly what they're saying, but Southerners are too stupid to know that. Just like when they say "Bless your heart!" and they mean "Damn! You're stupid!" Southern slang and their dialect is a world onto its own.

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

I'm sorry to hear that. Hope you'll be well soon.

Interesting symbolism for the "country line". Seems like 150 years were not enough to get over this civil war.

It's not a poem, just part of some pop lyrics.
I stumbled upon them and just got curious about this cryptic expression.

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/uncommon" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1414669">Schnurrbrat</a>
Lid geworden op: 07.03.2019

That reminds me of a real history when one owner found that his property [townhouse] is located in two counties. It is a nightmare in the tax season, since he had to pay taxes to both counties. It is also a constant source of jokes [including about laws to buy/smoke weed, etc, since laws do vary a lot. I'm not making this up, a real thing. [Phil, glad to see you btw].

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/blacksea4ever" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1390089">BlackSea4ever</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.07.2018

Phil, feel better! I'll give you a rain check on your native opinions. Unfortunately, I'm too weak to argue right now. But...give me some time!

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.10.2018

Thank you for your well wishes, however, please note the difference between "COUNT-R-Y" and "COUNTY".
In the USA "the Country" generally refers to "The South" as I have explained.
"County" is a subdivision of a State.
The USA is split up many ways:
STATE California
COUNTY San Diego
CITY / TOWN Poway
DISTRICT (For schools, water, electrical... etc. Depending which services you receive where you are.)

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.10.2018

Thanks for at least supporting me on the facts that in "The South" county lines are confusing as hell. I was in Texas, staying with a friend once. I was drinking a can of beer by the pool when a woman from the apartment complex came out to me, dressed in her panties and bra and said hysterically, "YOU CAN'T DRINK ALCOHOL OUT HERE! CHILDREN LIVE IN THESE APARTMENTS!!!"

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.10.2018

As horrible as it is, in the USA "The South" is still terribly racist. And, because so many people have moved from "The South" to other areas, their hatred has spread to states outside "The South" now. Still, we Americans are incredibly sensitive to this hatred, and racists are a MINORITY, even though they name themselves other things that make them seem as though they are not, such as: "The Moral Majority" which is neither "moral" nor a "majority"! Racists are often portrayed comically in our media. Yet, their hatred is nothing to be laughed at. Here is the most infamous comic sketch about racism that I have ever seen. By American standards it's shocking, funny, and horribly sad, yet I haven't found one person in the USA who didn't laugh when they saw it. If you decide to view it, you are forewarned that it is uncensored, and is banned in many countries for violating their "standards". So you may not be able to see it outside of the USA. Of course, we in the USA have hit rock-bottom on "standards", just look at our President.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7oXFmuUHLQ

Editor Soldier of Love
<a href="/nl/translator/flopsi" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1331196">Flopsi</a>
Lid geworden op: 12.03.2017

Now I've read all those comments and I'm sorry to say so, but I'm not enlightened. Besides some loathing about the south I read nothing I haven’t known before. (Reading Phil’s comment made me think about Delirious by Eddie Murphy talking about Texas:

“My motto is, life just be happy with the motherfuckers. I ain't into all that racism shit. Racism ain't as bad as it used to be anyway man…I mean its fucked up but, they don't call niggers, niggers no more and shit.

White people don't say it. Especially when there's niggas around. So I guess I wouldn't know it.
I went to Texas to look into racism, about two months ago. I had a show down in Texas, got off the plane and shit, walked up looking for racism.
My friends always told me: "You better not go to Texas! They'll fuck you up!"
And when a modern day brother here that shit

"What ! They ain't fucking nobody up!"

Brothers act like they couldn't have been slaves back 200 years ago. It's like motherfuckers liked that shit.

"I wish I was a slave; I would fuck somebody up!"
"Shit..tell me to bale some motherfucking cotton."
"I would have been on the street and shit..
"He would came up and say ey yo nigga bale this cotton?"
"I'd say suck my dick master."
"Suck my motherfucking dick."
"That's right I ain't baling a motherfucker."

The first dude that got off the boat said that shit.
"Bale that cotton."
"Fuck you, motherfucker!"
(Whip-sound)
Other motherfuckers say: "We bale the shit, just keep that shit away."
"Just keep that fuckin' shit away from me."

I got of the motherfucking plane, walked up, Got up, walked up, my bag. All my black shit on, black leather, big ass medallion and shit on like this.

Little white dude walk up and say: "This your bag?"
I said: "Yes, my fuckin' bag!" "Why, motherfucker? A black man can't have a suitcase?"
And the dude is like: "What the fuck's wrong with this guy?")

Anyway I really like to know what those lyrics are all about since everybody’s got them wrong as far as I've browsed through all of those translations.

I drop it down, I pick it up, I back it off the county line...
I drop it low, I back it up, I know you wanna think you're mine

Okay, "I drop it low, I back it up" is just some grind.
Still I don't get that "I drop it down, I pick it up, I back it ott the county line". What is it? This is my guesslation:
“I drop it low” – I give you what you need
“I pick it up” – I take it back
“I back it off the county line” – And you’ll never get it again

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

Yup Andrea, It looks like we're facing a real riddle here.

The ass shaking theory is the most likely so far, but this county line image sounds like a convoluted way of shaking one's bottom Teeth smile

Editor Soldier of Love
<a href="/nl/translator/flopsi" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1331196">Flopsi</a>
Lid geworden op: 12.03.2017

Damn, I really thought somebody would just step up and say: "Hey, that's easy ABC means XYZ.", but no, there's only some talking about butts and borders. But (in Germany) it's still only 8:45 and I should be more patient. Your question is still very fresh in the forum. Let's just wait. There's sure more coming up.

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/igeethecat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1365086">Igeethecat</a>
Lid geworden op: 16.12.2017

Phil, I hope you will feel better soon!

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/brat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334845">Brat</a>
Lid geworden op: 13.04.2017

Phil, I hope you'll recover soon.
At least your trying to move the ass southward is much promising. Regular smile
Well, the more people write here the greater grows my confidence about that some kind of 'state border line' situation is meant.
You see, such ridiculous situations are pretty common in States where you can get your ass kicked all off a sudden when you forget about having crossed a county line... As I have said before,there was even a film about a couple who wanted to have sex in four states at the same time (there's a place in the US where the borders of four states get in touch). I believe there's a huge lot of similar funny (and not so funny either) situations picked up by writers and thus made well-known among the public. We just have to guess about the exact fact the author is hinting to. I think the answer lies in the field of popular cinema or literature.

Editor
<a href="/nl/translator/sandring" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1263066">sandring</a>
Lid geworden op: 18.10.2015
Quote:

What is "back it out the county line" supposed to mean?

It means the line is mistranscribed. I've corrected that to my best knowledge. Now it goes like this

I drop it down, I pick it up, I pack in ice to candy line

This is what I make of this song.

The girl is playing little dirty games on that poor dude and she knows it. (Don't call me angel)
She sort of likes him (I appreciate the way you watch me, I can't lie) but he's far below her social standard ( I make my money, and I write the checks....All my girls successful, and you're just our guest) So she's reluctant to go out with him and keeps him exclusively "in her backyard" but on a short leash. (I drop it up=I stop our romance, I pick it up = start it again, I pack in ice in candy line = when he starts thinking high she cools him off).

She says he can't pay her price but on the other hand she doesn't let him go. ( I fell from heaven, now I'm living like a devil = she leads a double life playing her games on him)

At least that's what I think. Regular smile

PZ
<a href="/nl/translator/pinhas-zelenogorsky" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1410652">Pinchus Zelenogorsky</a>
Lid geworden op: 28.01.2019

Да, и в том фильме была целая очередь из таких пар.
Фил, поскорее поправляйтесь!

Editor
<a href="/nl/translator/sandring" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1263066">sandring</a>
Lid geworden op: 18.10.2015

Is it from a film? Had no idea.

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.10.2018

Well, yeah, I heard that Eddy Murphy thing too way back when he did it (in the late 80s or early 90s, I guess). I didn't think it was all that funny back then either. But, yeah. I did say it's not as bad as it used to be. Still, as for the translation, I did say IMHO, it could be many things. Whatever specifically the singer (or writer) meant by "back it out the county line" is really NOT clear. It's pretty much up to everyone's individual interpretation. That is certainly NOT an idiom, nor is it even a common Country saying. So, your translation is as good as any. I'm not saying that it's wrong. But, just from my (non-Southern) understanding, "back it off the county line" seems to mean something like "get it out of this county", which could be as simple as driving down the road within the same town somewhere in the South. But, hey! You're interpretation could well be more accurate than my "city" understanding, especially if you're from the South. I would go with a Southerner's interpretation, over a city person's interpretation any day when it comes to Southern sayings. Best of luck on your hunt to find a definitive meaning to that phrase, but I really don't think you'll find one. Like I've said, it's NOT a standard idiom that even Southerners routinely say. Confused smile

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/phil-ambro" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1399548">Phil Ambro</a>
Lid geworden op: 19.10.2018

Can't hear the original, but just speaking your new transcription, could it be:
"I drop it down, I pick it up. I'm packin' ice to the county line"?
That makes perfect sense!!! Meaning...
I drop it down - "I do whatever I'm here to do. (Sounds like a drug deal - possibly he's selling drugs.)"
"I pick it up - "I end my business and get the hell out of there."
"I'm packin' ice to the county line - "I have a loaded gun (for protection) until I get back to the county where I live, and I'm safe again." (Apparently this person went across county lines to do his illegal shit (sounds like selling drugs).

Novice
<a href="/nl/translator/justint" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1433365">JustinT</a>
Lid geworden op: 15.09.2019

Hi, I joined this site today because I recently heard the Don't Call Me Angel song, and saw both "I back it off the county line" and “I back it out the county line.” I heard “I back it ‘cross the county line” I read the comments, and may have something to add. Don't know if it hurts or helps, but thoughts:

1. The lyric could possibly be "I back it across/'cross the county line." The music swells through these lines and makes the delivery a bit ambigious. Perhaps across is changed to 'cross for melody? Lana Del Rey’s delivery is also rather dreamy and breathy, so maybe a reference to consent and/or boundaries of a sexual nature?

In Lana Del Rey's "13 Beaches" song, a section goes: "Can I let go / And let your memory dance / In the ballrom of my mind / Across the county line." Maybe an Easter egg insertion for her hardcore fans?

2. The theme of Lana Del Rey's verse seems to be about desire and consent to me:

"I appreciate the way you watch me, I can't lie.
I drop it down, I pick it up"
(Meaning, you noticed me and you’re not so bad either so I'm determining if I'm interested further?)

(If you use my interpretation of the lyric:)
"I back it 'cross the county line"
(Meaning, the desire is great enough to consent to crossing the boundary/border?)
OR
(If you use original lyric:)
"I back it off/out the county line"
(Meaning, I’m taking a more detailed look at the desire?)

(and this makes me feel:)
"I fell from heaven, now I'm living like a devil" (and)
"You can't get me off your mind."

(Perhaps "county line" refers to consent/boundaries? Song goes on to say:)

"I appreciate the way you want me, I can't lie,
I drop it low, I back it up,
I know you wanna think you're mine"
(Meaning, I’m still evaluating and will follow up with you. I’m considering your feelings too ?)

“Baby, I totally get it, you can't guess”
So you can't get me off your mind”
(Meaning, you’re interested because it’s my decision ?)

“We in it together but don't call me Angel"
(Meaning, I decided we’re together, but don’t refer to me by this particular name)

Now... seems logical that “it” could refer to:

-the evaluating/decision making process, and/or the actual decision yielded at the conclusion of that process.

-If one was dancing at a club, where lots of pop songs are played, or perhaps in a intimate/sexual context, “it” could refer to my consent to dance/to have you touch me/part of my body/etc.

So I thought I’d join because this was a crazy coincidence and I’m glad I shared these thoughts I’ve had for the past 12 hours with someone who was also wondering! Lol!

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/brat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334845">Brat</a>
Lid geworden op: 13.04.2017

Well, having listened to that murmur in my headphones I'd say she's singing ''I back a horse to count a line'' (?) (count all out? counter lying ? ) The end is not that clear at all... Sad smile

Novice
<a href="/nl/translator/justint" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1433365">JustinT</a>
Lid geworden op: 15.09.2019

On my most recent listen, I actually heard "I back it past the county line" as well. Ugh, the world may never know what this lyric is.

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

For now the only thing that seems certain is, the expression has no obvious meaning.
So much for the blinding flash...

Maybe explaining the meaning of "county line" in "13 Beaches" as kindly quoted by Justin could help?

Editor
<a href="/nl/translator/sandring" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1263066">sandring</a>
Lid geworden op: 18.10.2015

NATIVES!!!!! Where do you hear the word "county"?????? I don't hear anything close to it. It may be "pack" or "bag" or "beg" but there's no county there. Sorry.

Novice
<a href="/nl/translator/%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%A8%D9%83%D8%B1-%D9%8A%D9%88%D8%B3%D9%81" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1433425">بابكر يوسف</a>
Lid geworden op: 16.09.2019

سلام عليكم

whimsical chatterbox
<a href="/nl/translator/silenced" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1423036">silenced</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.05.2019

Whatever she might sing, these lyrics have been quoted in a few magazine articles, so at least a couple of critics or marketing guys seemed to consider them canon.
Apparently she used the same bloody cryptic "county line" in this other "13 beaches" song of hers. Maybe it's just one of her pet words? Or a private joke? The name of her cousin's pet gecko?
After all she named her last album "Norman Fucking Rockwell" because, well, because she did.

Super Member
<a href="/nl/translator/brat" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1334845">Brat</a>
Lid geworden op: 13.04.2017
sandring wrote:

NATIVES!!!!! Where do you hear the word "county"?????? I don't hear anything close to it.

And what's this in that case? A cunty loin or whatsoever?
At least I could swear it's neither Norman, nor fucking, nor Rockwell there.
Goddamn, AURORA was even better. Teeth smile

Editor True-to-original translations.
<a href="/nl/translator/michaelna" class="userpopupinfo username" rel="user1257575">MichaelNa</a>
Lid geworden op: 29.08.2015

When you asked for a specific meaning for a couple of sentences without providing the complete song (even though you included a link to the song) you basically invited absurd interpretations because those sentences, by themselves, are vague. Without the necessary context “it” could be anything.
The song starts with “Boy, don't call me angel, you ain't got me right. Don't call me angel, you can't pay my price”. With that in mind then “I drop it down, I pick it up, I back it off the county line” (as per the official looking lyric video provided in the comments section of the song not the lyrics provided in the transcription) can be interpreted as she is not ready to commit to anybody, a form of wham, bam, thank you, boy/ma’m. Regular smile

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