Un velero llamado libertad (İngilizce translation)

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İngilizce translation

A Sailboat Named Freedom

He left yesterday,
He took his things and began to sail (navigate),
a shirt, jeans,
and a song.
Where will he go.
Where will he go.
He said goodbye,
and he decided to duel with the sea,
and travel the world in his sailboat,
and sail (navigate), nai na na, sail.
And he left,
and his boat he named Freedom,
and in the sky he discovered gulls,
and painted, wakes in the sea.
And he left,
and his boat he named Freedom,
and in the sky he discovered gulls,
and painted, wakes in the sea.
His heart,
sought a different way of living,
but the waves shouted: go,
with the others, nai na na, with the others.
And he fell asleep,
And the Night yelled: where are you going?
and in his dreams he drew gulls,
and thought, I should return today.
And he returned,
and a voice asked: how are you?
and upon seeing her discovered,
eyes, nai na na, as blue as the sea.
And he left,
and his boat he called Freedom,
and in the sky he discovered gulls,
and painted, wakes in the sea.
And he left,
and his boat he called Freedom,
and in the sky he discovered gulls,
and painted, wakes in the sea.
 
lpenguin kullanıcısı tarafından Salı, 02/06/2015 - 04:55 tarihinde eklendi
lpenguin tarafından en son Perş, 21/07/2016 - 19:56 tarihinde düzenlendi
Yazarın yorumları:

'Wakes in the sea' refers to the waves left behind from a boat.
I need to divulge: Google translate provided 80% of the translation and I did the grammar and context corrections.

İspanyolca

Un velero llamado libertad

"Un velero llamado ..." şarkısına ait daha çok çeviri
İngilizcelpenguin
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Yorumlar
lpenguin    Perş, 21/07/2016 - 20:10

Hello. I checked over and over and I can't figure out which pronoun you are referring to. Can you provide the example?
Also, In the Spanish version, he says "le llamo Libertad" and not 'la llamo libertad'. I guess Spanish does not use the English standard of referring cars, boats and (formerly) hurricanes as women.
Thoughts?

roster 31    Perş, 21/07/2016 - 20:31

I may be wrong but, to me, "she left". I'm refering to the whole poem.

lpenguin    Cum, 22/07/2016 - 09:28

Interesting point. The author did leave the gender vague and it is possible to replace the 'He' with 'She' throughout the song.

My first impression was that the author (Jose Luis Perales) was writing about himself back in 1978-79.

The second impression was the only clue where he mentions "una camisa, un pantalón vaquero" versus a "blusa y mahones", for example. Check these definitions:
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/shirt
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/jeans

I thought about - to be gender neutral, I can change the "Where will he go. He said goodbye" to "Where will that person go, that person said goodbye" - but that would add extra syllables and not sound melodic. Maybe this is a limitation of English itself. Is there a single word gender-neutral replacement for 'he' and 'she' besides 'that','this', 'those'? Ie. "Where will that go. That said goodbye" sounds bad...perhaps for this song we/you need to create a new neutral pronoun as was done with the titles Miss and Mrs. - Ms.

Anyway, I think I'll stick with 'He' but if you like - feel free to cut and paste my version and post a new translation and search/replace 'He' with 'She'. Thank you for your observation and suggestion. Regular smile

Christa H.    Cmt, 23/07/2016 - 19:57

Well "le" is the indirect object pronoun, and is used for both masculine and feminine (note that it's "a su barco", "to his boat", so indirect object). What the direct object would be, I'm not sure, maybe the name "Libertad" itself? Unless there's some rule I'm forgetting, which is always possible. The direct object pronouns are "lo" and "la", and which one is used depends entirely on the grammatical gender of the noun. In this song we have "un velero" and "un barco", which are masculine. If it were "una barca" it would be feminine, but as far as I can tell, "una barca" is a small boat, like you'd pull with a boat trailer or paddle around the lake, not something you'd want to duel with the sea in. All the words for "car" that I know of are masculine, "carro", "coche", "auto". No clue about hurricanes.

Christa H.    Perş, 21/07/2016 - 19:43

Why is it "Liberty" in the title, but "Freedom" in the lyrics? I know they mean the same, but I like consistency :-P

roster 31    Cum, 22/07/2016 - 12:11

NIce of you to check all these things but, you don't have to change anything, it was just a hint on my part. As you said, the gender is vague (intentionally, perhaps), therefore, it can be left as is. (The title is fine: "freedom" is the word).
Thanks.