Du hast (English translation)

  • Artist: Rammstein
  • Song: Du hast 63 translations
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English translationEnglish
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Du hast

Versions: #1#2#3#4#5#6#7#8#9
You
You have
You have asked
 
You
You have
You have asked
 
You
You have
You have asked
 
You
You have
You have asked
 
You
You have
You have asked
You have asked
You have asked me
You have asked me
You have asked me and I have said nothing
 
Do you want to be faithful for eternity
Until death parts you?
 
No!
No!
 
Do you want to be faithful for eternity
Until death parts you?
 
No!
No!
 
You
You have
You have asked
 
You
You have
You have asked
 
You
You have
You have asked
 
You
You have
You have asked
You have asked
You have asked me
You have asked me
You have asked me and I have said nothing
 
Do you want to be faithful for eternity
Until death parts you?
 
No!
No!
 
Do you want to love her even in bad days
Unto the death of the vagina?
 
No!
No!
 
Thanks!
thanked 663 times
Submitted by TahiraTahira on Thu, 09/10/2008 - 21:00

Du hast

Comments
SteenaSteena    Wed, 01/07/2009 - 18:32

Feel free to add your translation via "Add another translation" button!

sabrinacat415sabrinacat415    Fri, 18/10/2013 - 02:42

Du hasst would be 'you hate', it is written DU Hast which is 'you have'

jlabesjlabes    Fri, 04/06/2010 - 03:17

guest 1 is sort of right.
* haben (to have) conjugated is hast but
* hassen (to hate) is hasst. the extra s obviously can't be heard in spoken/sung german, so it's an easy mistake to make. I know this, because I've made it Teeth smile

WydawMakahWydawMakah    Sat, 04/09/2010 - 02:59

The traduction of the marry vows is totally incorrect, "unto the death of the vagina"??? what the hell

PingpongpaddlePingpongpaddle    Sat, 30/03/2013 - 01:55

In the second last chorus, it is Tod der Scheide instead of Tod euch scheiden.

Tod der Scheide means death of the vagina. In the lyrics, until death of the vagina.
Tod euch scheiden means death separates you. In the lyrics, until death separates you.

Scheide is a vagina.
Scheiden is the action of divorce or to separate.

magicmuldermagicmulder    Sun, 04/09/2016 - 09:19

Yup, another intentional ambiguity between "'till death do us part" and "'till you no longer have an interest in sex".

Hansi K_LauerHansi K_Lauer    Sun, 04/09/2016 - 12:53

@magicmulder
... or a sexist reduction of the meaning of a woman (wife) to her genital part.

NagashiwaNagashiwa    Sun, 19/09/2010 - 15:18

No that's not true

Du hast = You got
Du hast mich = You got me

Willst du, bis der Tod euch scheidet, = Would you, until Death Do Us Apart
Treu ihr sein für alle Tage? = be trusting for all days

Willst du, bis zum Tod der Scheide, = Would you, till the Death break us apart
Sie lieben auch in schlechten Tagen? = Would you love too in bad days

Something like that.
I don't really know how to translate it, but it are the words who you get if you get married in the Church :3

Scheide = not Vagina but: separate

PingpongpaddlePingpongpaddle    Fri, 29/03/2013 - 23:03

Haben is to have. This become hast when conjugated with du.
Hassen is to hate. This becomes hasst when conjugated with du.

Rammstein's intention was to mean both with the context of the song. When saying either of the 2 words, there is really no difference in the pronunciation.

magicmuldermagicmulder    Sun, 04/09/2016 - 09:20

Exactly. It's actually pretty simple:

"Du hast mich" (which is an incomplete sentence) can also be understood as "Du hasst mich" ("you hate me"); the ambiguity is only partly resolved when the sentence is completed ("Du hast mich gefragt" = "you asked me") since the two meanings still can go together: "You hate me... You asked me and I didn't say a word".

For this reason (and see my comment about "Tod der Scheide" above) it's actually an untranslatable play on words.

Hansi K_LauerHansi K_Lauer    Sun, 04/09/2016 - 13:33

... which is quite typical in traditional German popular party songs for beer tents or private festivities, after the Schnapslevel has risen to a certain degree. They love to sing songs that start seemingly with dirty lines, but after several repeats, when the line is completed turn out being comletly inoffensive, putting the ones who had been frowning initially in the place of a person with a dirty mind.
Wink smile
e.g.:
Sie lässt sich bürsten,
Sie lässt sich bürsten,
Sie lässt sich Bürsten schicken nach Amerika

magicmuldermagicmulder    Mon, 05/09/2016 - 07:56

Not to forget those which expect a dirty rhyme ("Jetzt geht es los mit ganz großen Schritten // Und Erwin faßt der Heidi von hinten an die ... Schulter" or "Zehn nackte Frisösen // Mit richtig nassen ... Haaren"). Wink smile

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